The below Conservation Management Plans and Garden Suburb Planning Principles highlight the values that have been used to create the draft updated Heritage Guidelines (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area).

Colonel Light Gardens Conservation Management Plans (1989 & 2005)

There are two Colonel Light Gardens Conservation Management Plans, which:

  • document the historical development of the suburb
  • analyse the significance of the garden suburb movement
  • identify the heritage values of the suburb
  • provide conservation policies of the public and private spaces through the suburb.

The plans are a key tool to understand and manage the heritage values of Colonel Light Gardens, prepared based on best-practice ‘Burra Charter’ principles – the guiding charter for Australian heritage management.

While the heritage values and conservation policies outlined in these plans are reflected in the Heritage Guidelines (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area), these plans are separate documents and do not have a statutory role in planning decisions.

Garden Suburb Planning Principles

The Colonel Light Gardens Historical Society Inc. has compiled the following Garden Suburb Planning Principles (principles) to capture the essence of Colonel Light Gardens. These are:

  • A park-like environment
  • A distinct community with its own identity
  • An abundance of well distributed open space
  • Strict land use zoning for housing and commercial areas
  • Roads designed according to their planned level of use
  • Street corners rounded for improved traffic visibility
  • Housing designed for private detached homes for single families with ample front side and rear yards

The Colonel Light Gardens Statement of Significance reflects these principles and is the legislative point of truth for the heritage values of the Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area.

The draft updated guidelines now include a list of the heritage features of the suburb, to explain how the buildings and parks illustrate the heritage significance of the suburb. These mirror the Garden Suburb Planning Principles, but provide more detail and reflect the context of the Planning and Design Code as follows:

Garden Suburb Planning Principles

Draft updated guidelines

A park-like environment

“(b) A planned mix of wide and narrow streets with a dominant, established park-like landscaped character, with extensive reserve planting based on the original design intent (street tree species and layout, lawn, footpath bitumen, vertical kerbing and simple pedestrian cross overs). Laneways without kerbs and paving also of note.”

“(e) The formality, planned purpose and abundance of open public reserves, formal street gardens and pocket parks – including shared parks to the rear of properties in the north of the suburb.”

A distinct community with its own identity

Not reflected in the draft guidelines as not a planning/ design matter.

An abundance of well distributed open space

“(e) The formality, planned purpose and abundance of open public reserves, formal street gardens and pocket parks – including shared parks to the rear of properties in the north of the suburb.”

Strict land use zoning for housing and commercial areas

“(d) Suburb zones initially planned by function and location, including residential, commercial and educational, religious and recreational precincts.”

Roads designed according to their planned level of use

“(a) Hierarchy of straight and curved symmetrical roadways of a variety of lengths, rounded street corners, and rear laneways - which discourage through traffic and designed to create unfolding sequences of attractive, green and varied spaces and terminal vistas.

(b) A planned mix of wide and narrow streets with a dominant, established park-like landscaped character, with extensive reserve planting based on the original design intent (street tree species and layout, lawn, footpath bitumen, vertical kerbing and simple pedestrian cross overs). Laneways without kerbs and paving also of note”

Street corners rounded for improved traffic visibility

“(a) Hierarchy of straight and curved symmetrical roadways of a variety of lengths, rounded street corners, and rear laneways - which discourage through traffic and designed to create unfolding sequences of attractive, green and varied spaces and terminal vistas.”

Housing designed for private detached homes for single families with ample front side and rear yards

“(f) Low density residential development with dwellings sited on generous allotments with ample front, side and rear yards. Single detached, dwellings of similar scale, design, and provenance, with consistent front and side setbacks – 1920-30s in period. Heritage features include:…”