How can we grow our food, wine and agribusiness sectors?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 2 September to 25 October 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

We have worked with peak industry bodies: Primary Producers SA, Food South Australia and the South Australian Wine Industry Association to develop a Food, Wine and Agribusiness Discussion Paper . This paper sets the scene on the sector as a whole and its contribution to the South Australian economy.

Read the discussion paper and let us know what does growth look like for your business by commenting below.

Comments closed

Jackie Harrop

22 Oct 2019

What Agriculture in this state needs is security – that includes water security, security that our “clean, green” industry will be protected, security against illegal trespass and security against the ever-increasing threat of mining on our limited amount of arable land.

Schools need more Agriculture teachers and we need to recognise that they need extra support. Why do Ag teachers have to spend weekends at school feeding animals etc. No other teaching job expects you to work 7 days a week and with the current system it is understandable that we can’t find enough Ag Teachers. Who would want to teach under those conditions? There is an overabundance of jobs in Agriculture. Let’s start getting kids interested in Agriculture at schools with good teachers, resources and funding.

Drought assistance to those who need it, when they need it. We have families struggling to put food on the table and to feed and water animals, but we can give drought money to District Councils (in non-drought affected areas) to put dog parks into towns and it’s called drought relief. I realise that this is funded by the federal government, but it is still wrong but doesn’t change the fact that we do not do enough to support farmers who are struggling.

Previous governments have cut funding to SARDI and PIRSA etc. How about increasing the funding? As Agriculture is the most significant contributor to the state’s economy and the largest export sector it would be interesting to compare the staff and resources put into the Dept. of Energy and Mining compared to PIRSA. Agriculture is taken for granted in this state.

The government is about to introduce farm trespassing laws. Great idea but hardly consistent. Under proposed laws if a lobby group or individual trespass onto my land and disrupt my business, they could receive a $5000 fine. If a lobby group or individual goes near a mine and disrupts their business, they could receive up to a $150,000 fine, an increase from $5000.
In Parliament recently, The Hon. R.I. Lucas, justified the fine increase by stating “A maximum penalty of $5,000 is so low that it is unlikely to be in the public interest to incur substantial legal costs in a criminal prosecution to recover such a penalty.”
That would make a mockery of any new trespass law.
Once again this shows what this government thinks of Agriculture in this state.

In Parliament over the last couple of months the government have indicated that they are not interested in Agriculture in this state and have put their full support behind the Mining and Resource industries. Where were the Minister and PIRSA throughout the debate?
This government had the opportunity to change an outdated Mining Bill to the betterment of both the Mining industry and Agriculture and they chose the Mining industry and ignored Agriculture. Both industries called for an independent review into the Bill and they were ignored. I watched the bill go through both houses of government and I was disgusted by the lack of support shown to Agriculture in this state by both mainstream political parties. There is not one change to the bill that will give the Agriculture Industry in this state any sort of security.
The only thing growing in South Australia will be the number of mines.
Growing food, wine and agribusiness – not in this state - not while this government chooses Mining over the interests of Agriculture!

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PIRSA > Jackie Harrop

25 Oct 2019

Hi Jackie,
Thank you for providing feedback. We will take this into consideration when developing our Sector Plan.

John Stafford

11 Oct 2019

I neglected to emphasise in my previous comment that Biological Nutrient Acquisition seems not to increase plant yield by increasing the uptake of soil nutrients, but rather by rearranging the proportion of nutrients. A vineyard’s 100% increase in fruit yield was achieved with an unexpected 13% reduction in nitrogen uptake by the vines.

If BNA contributes to plant health by controlling the allocation of nutrients, what beneficial effects might BNA grown cereals have on human and animal health?

John Stafford

04 Oct 2019

The simplest method of lifting the sustainable economic growth rate of primary food industries in South Australia by an average of 3 per cent per year would be to raise crop yields of that order. But South Australian farmers have long been punching well above their weight by cropping in rainfall regions and on soils that many of the world’s farmers would consider very marginal. Must our farmers now lift their game even further when they are already supplying very competitive world markets from a less than optimum environment?

Our history shows that when faced with seemingly insoluble problems (like not having sufficient labour to manually harvest their crops) South Australian farmers have resorted to innovation that ultimately benefited the world. Do we have any more rabbits that we can pull out of the hat? There may be one or even two.

Profitable cereal crops require a soil that is capable of holding adequate moisture. This soil must also retain soluble nutrients, or support micro organisms that can acquire those nutrients.

It is therefore necessary for our first rabbit to be a process that will firstly raise and thereafter maintain increased levels of carbon in our cropping soils. Two sequential prototype stationary burners have thus far indicated that it should be possible to develop a relatively simple mobile machine that can burn off the hydrocarbon gas fraction in standing stubble to leave biochar on the ground. The high temperature rapid pyrolysis involved should also produce carbon of sufficient quality to qualify for full carbon sequestration credits.

Rabbit number two appeared quite by accident when an inoculant came in contact with a native grass ground cover in a vineyard in 2010. Some form of symbiosis resulted in the vines receiving a biologically proportioned suite of nutrients that doubled their yield of fruit. Now nine years later, potted trials have indicated that this process of biological nutrient acquisition can be applied to cereals with similar increases in yield.

Can these conjured possibilities facilitate such an increase in productivity to achieve the economic growth rate planned for this state? Evaluation and further development by appropriate State research institutions could provide the answer.

Government Agency

PIRSA > John Stafford

04 Oct 2019

Hi John,
Thank you for your comment, which we will take into consideration when developing our Sector Plan.
If you would like to provide any further feedback, you are welcome to complete the online feedback form or attend one of our upcoming public meetings.

cliff Hignett

27 Sep 2019

A very significant part of the states current rural production depends on water supplies from the River Murray. Irrespective of how the current supply is rationed (science, politics, or just plain theft) , this supply is (probably) drying up as a result of climate change (rainfall in the basin has been decreasing for 60 years ). It could 'dry up' for political reasons at VERY SHORT NOTICE - a month? We need an alternative URGENTLY.
Seawater desalination schemes are the only alternative and they take years to build. We need at least 3 schemes . One for the Upper Spencer Gulf, one for the upper South East, and one for the Barossa / Claire areas. If we initiate this process soon then we may be able to 'sell' our Murray water rights and use the capital to fund some of the scheme. Even the NSW cotton farmers might contribute.
Israel used such schemes to turn desert into a horticultural food bowl that feeds millions - why cant we do the same?

Government Agency

PIRSA > cliff Hignett

27 Sep 2019

Hi Cliff,
Thanks for joining our discussion. We will take this and your comment below into consideration in developing the Food, Wine and Agribusiness Sector Plan.
If you would like to provide more information on these or any other issues, please feel free to complete the online feedback form or attend one of our public meetings.

cliff Hignett

27 Sep 2019

Food wine and agribusiness all depend on water supply. Never mind expansion, the continued existence of most regional agriculture industry depends on new water supplies. Winter / spring rainfall over the most productive areas has decreased by 30% since 1960. Groundwater supplies in many areas are overutilised.
Our 'wettest' zone - the South east - is also drying up, and the minister is actively preventing the NRM from doing their job to ration the available water via the Water Allocation Plan. Any irrigation business setting up in the SE, NEEDS to know what future prospects for water supply are. The minister is deliberately with-holding this information. Are we seeing the same sort of corruption that has happened around the Murray Darling? Any business considering irrigation in the SE would be VERY foolish to invest until he could be assured that the water allocation system is driven by science not political favours and cronyism.

Charmaine Fulton

27 Sep 2019

One of the fastest growing trends in the food industry is plant based diets. Hemp seed has a very high level of protein on comparison to other seed and nuts, regenerates soil and of course, the fibre from the plant itself has so many uses and huge opportunity there too. Hemp also you requires much less water.
People are becoming more aware and are making more ethical food choices. How Now Dairy in VIC ethical and kinder business model is creating enormous demand for their dairy product.
The artificial insemination of female only sperm sees only female calves which stay with their mothers until they start to ween and are then milked. It’s a kinder approach to dairy and something people are concerned with.

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PIRSA > Charmaine Fulton

27 Sep 2019

Hi Charmaine,
Thanks for your feedback. We will take this into consideration in developing the Food, Wine and Agribusiness Sector Plan.
If you would like to provide further information, please feel free to complete the online feedback form or attend one of our public meetings.

Robyn Verrall

17 Sep 2019

As an exporter not even able to export out of SA, there needs to be a lot more done, cost of freight is a small barrier for us but distance and opportunity to do this well is prohibitive in SA.
As a company we would employ SA people, and move our head office back here instead of QLD.
We are proud South Aussies and it stings (not only our pockets in freight) but our sense of state pride that we are doing great business out of SA

Government Agency

PIRSA > Robyn Verrall

17 Sep 2019

Hi Robyn,
Thanks for your comment. We will take this into consideration in developing the Food, Wine and Agribusiness Sector Plan.
If you would like to provide more information on this or any other issue, please feel free to complete the online feedback form or attend one of our public meetings.

Robyn Verrall > Robyn Verrall

17 Sep 2019

I will, I am looking at all the meetings and I am trying to get a date to suit me as I'm in QLD and likely China - where we export to and maybe Bhutan as I am mentoring farmers in this region.
Thanks for getting in touch. Will jump onto the feedback form and complete

jasminJ jasmin

12 Sep 2019

yes it can be very essential element for growth.

Ian Wright

04 Sep 2019

As an emerging exporter I am astounded at the cost of getting a Shipping Container from my factory onto a ship at Port Adelaide.
$650 cartage. That's how much it costs in sea freight to Malaysia. $140 to verify its weight. $660 to lift it from the wharf onto the ship.
No wonder we can't compete.

Government Agency

PIRSA > Ian Wright

04 Sep 2019

Hi Ian,
Thank you for your feedback. We will take this into consideration when developing the Food, Wine and Agribusiness Sector Plan.
If you would like to provide more information on this or any other issue, you are welcome to complete the online feedback form or attend one of our upcoming public meetings.