What are your thoughts on the revised policy on the management of wild dogs in South Australia?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 10 February to 17 April 2020. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

We want to hear your feedback on the revised policy on the management of wild dogs in South Australia.

Read the revised Declared Animal Policy (Wild dogs and dingoes), the proposed changes and the Frequently Asked Questions and provide your feedback by commenting below.

Your feedback will be considered by PIRSA, NRM boards, and the Minister for Environment and Water and will inform the development of the final version of the policy.

Comments closed

Andy Macintosh

18 Apr 2020

1080 is the most effective and clearly the most important tool in the toolbox for reducing the numbers of feral pests introduced into this country so long ago and has since made some 20 native species extinct.. Wild dogs and dingoes are a threat to workers in the remote areas and those in urban areas. They destroy livestock and do not discriminate - The dingo fence was built for a reason and it has been the best line of defence, but threats breaking through must be dealt with quickly before more breeding explodes these threats further..

Kamilla Borzeta

18 Apr 2020

Control, kill, restrict.
These are the policies. 1080 should be prohibited, there are other HUMAIN options

Shirley Birney

18 Apr 2020

Wild dogs are a result of cruel or irresponsible owners and local governments’ dismal failure to enforce and/or revise animal welfare laws. Australian governments, to appease complicit industries, have perpetrated many evils on non-humans, but none on such a scale as Australia’s wanton use of 1080 bait to slaughter sentient animals. It is disgraceful that the prime reason for such savagery is to protect alien, invasive sheep and cattle that are responsible for gorging on diminishing and precious resources and elevated greenhouse gases. Data demonstrates that many non-target species regularly visit and sample 1080 baits. In WA research by Murdoch University found that 99 per cent of monitored baits were taken by creatures other than the intended target of the hapless fox. Baiting wild dogs, dingoes and any other non-human species with 1080 bait, to inflict fear, terror and unimaginable suffering is the construct of morally inferior barbarians.

Susie Hearder

18 Apr 2020

Animal grazing causes immense animal suffering, death and environmental damage. Distributing toxic 1080 poison into the environment, a substance banned around the world for good reason not only kills dingoes and wild dogs, but many off target species including wildlife and pollutes the environment as well. Death by this toxic poison is particularly barbaric with a cruel, agonising and long suffering slow death. We need our iconic dingo as our apex predator. We need to farm crops, not sentient beings. We need to develop compassion for others. We need to ban cruel and toxic 1080.

Megan Arnold

17 Apr 2020

The fact that 1080 is banned in many other countries should tell the SA government something very critical - that this is a highly toxic and damaging chemical that shouldn't be in contact with our pristine environment. It is an incredibly cruel death for any animal that comes into contact with it. Not just a native species such as Dingo, but also anything that many come to ingest that animal, e.g. birds, lizards, insects etc. The year is 2020, not 1960. The issues that we need to grapple with are climate change, not how to protect imported species that do far more damage to the environment than the native ones that have existed here for hundreds of years. Regardless of my personal views on mass livestock production and how this contributes to climate change, there are many other far more humane ways of dealing with threats to livestock and investment should be on co-existence methods, not abhorrent poisoning of animals to a slow torturous death by poison and then leaching of such into the wider environment.

Sarah Rajkovic

17 Apr 2020

Humans are an abhorrent species, we are the ones that need 1080.

Matthew Booth

17 Apr 2020

I think blanket baiting of wild dogs should be banned, there should be a clear definition between wild dogs like dingoes and feral dogs

Padma Ciel

17 Apr 2020

The mismanagement of our environment and native species continues. Studies have confirmed that where dingoes roam there are no feral cats or foxes. Has not the from nature message sunk in with the coved 19 outbreak? We are all too fond of killing. Leave the dingoes alone. As for 1080; I have lost two dogs to this heinous poison thanks to an irresponsible neighbour. It allowed me to witness the horror of the death cycle that took 8 hour with both dogs but didn’t show symptoms of gravity until it is too late to get medical assistance. If you witnessed how this poison works on an animal, you would deem it a criminal offence to use it. 1080 should be outlawed. It is at all times unacceptable, cruel, murderous violence upon another living being. It is high time we began making noble decisions. The use of 1080 is odious, reprehensible and a shameful disgrace.

Michelle Fischer

17 Apr 2020

Scientists and environmentalists, as well as indigenous communities know that Dingoes (and calling them ‘wild dogs’ does not change the fact that they ARE Dingoes) are Australia's prime apex predator and must be protected.
Rather than eradicating them we should be exploring ways to coexist.
Dingoes can be protected alongside sheep and cows.
There are many non-lethal alternatives to protect livestock.

1080 baits are toxic to all living things and to our Australian environment.
They don't just cause excruciating deaths for dingoes. They also kill other native species.
Many other native species suffer agonizing deaths from secondary feeding and taking baits, e.g. goannas, quolls, and marsupial rats and also some of our native birds.
1080 poison must be banned.
It is already banned in many overseas countries.

Please ensure the dingo has a future. Australia's native animals deserve to be protected. This is the priority.
Funds can be implemented to conserve/ reimburse stock losses.
Non lethal means for protecting livestock must be implemented.
The funds currently funnelled to poisons companies, shooters and doggers can and should be redirected to graziers to maintain their stock fencing, and the use of guardian dogs etc.
Pastoralists and native species can co exist.
Save the Dingo. Ban 1080 nationwide.
It has no place in a civilised society.
Killing dingoes has no place in a civilised society.

Jenny Williams

17 Apr 2020

Unbelievable that 1080 is still allowed to be used to "control" animals when it is clear how cruel this poison is. What about other animals who will undoubtedly eat the baits? I assume 1080 is the cheapest and easiest option but barbaric cruelty to any animal is not acceptable and I absolutely oppose this. The welfare of all animals needs to be taken seriously for a change. They are just as able to feel pain and terror as any human and it is time government and other agencies recognised this and stopped participating in and condoning animal cruelty.

Moira Ferres

17 Apr 2020

The dingo is a native animal to Australia. I emphatically oppose the use of 1080 poison in any way shape or form. I strongly disagree with the propose method of management of our wild dogs in South Australia. Our wildlife has been devastated by the recent bush fires and we can not risk the death of any more of our wildlife being killed. The use of 1080 is a barbaric, archaic poison that should never be used on any occasion. Animals that ingest this poison die a slow and agonising death. It is incomprehensible that this would even be considered as a form of animal management of any kind.

Lynda Loades

17 Apr 2020

Dingo are valuable wildlife and this was their home long before we came and built on it, They should be protected, and if need be desexed to keep numbers down, Actual wilddogs again , blame the humans who dumped them not the dogs, bring in better laws for domestic animals, and desex and release, but until you actually make councels follow up on laws this problem will continue.Never poisen a animal.

Judi Viti

17 Apr 2020

Uncomprehensible that this barbaric practice is still in use or considered in our country

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Judi Viti

17 Apr 2020

Hi Judi

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Joanne Payne

17 Apr 2020

How do you know that these are wild dogs and not native dingos? As a native animal that has suffered from constant persecution for the better part of the last century. As a result, the dingo is listed as vulnerable. Any loss to this already vulnerable popdilation could be catastrophic. As the apex predator, a flow on effect will be felt with feral cats taking over, which cause more devastation and are classed as feral. Any baiting of dogs is barbaric and the secondary poisoning is a real concern. Dingos must be protected as all other native species.

Jen Breuker

17 Apr 2020

This a barbaric idea. Its 2020, why is Australia still practicing cruel "solutions" for this kind of thing? What about the animals that are going to be killed other than the target ones. This is NOT a solution

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Jen Breuker

17 Apr 2020

Hi Jen

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Please refer to previous replies re off target species.

Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Arti J'lani

17 Apr 2020

I under no circumstances give any one permission to spend my tax money on such an act. The following are the most important reasons 1) there is no such thinking as killing humanely. Killing is killing and leaves blood on ones hands. killing another living being is a criminal act. 2) Killing might seem a quick and easy fix but it is a fix and not a solution. Sterilising though slow is certainly more beneficial in the long run. At the very least you won't constantly be spending money on an ongoing "humanely killing" act. 3) Further, I request you consider the consequence of access to the 1080 poison. Today you give everyday citizens access to a poison to kill animals. Tomorrow there is a possibility they might use it to kill others or take their own lives.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Arti J'lani

17 Apr 2020

Hi Arti

Thanks for your comments and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Alicja Clisby

17 Apr 2020

I oppose the use of 1080 poison, as it results in an unimaginably painful death. Visible symptoms of ingesting the poison include vomiting, anxiety, disorientation and shaking. It takes many hours for the animal to die and therefore, it is a very inhumane method of population control. Additionally, it is not only inhumane, but also indiscriminate - the baits will be consumed by and kill a range of native animals as well as dingoes. As a highly developed nation, we should instead be considering more progressive non-lethal population control methods such as immunocontraceptives applied through either food pellets or darting to sterilise the dingoes, reducing their population size. This is a far more humane and viable long term solution to any ecological concerns. I strongly urge the government to not condemn dingoes and other Australian native animals to such cruel and painful deaths. Economic growth is important, but not at all costs.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Alicja Clisby

17 Apr 2020

Hi Alicja

Thank you for your considered thoughts on the sterilisation of wild dogs. Unfortunately not all wild dogs take baits, even if for sterilisation, so they will continue to kill until their lifespan expires which could decimate the sheep industry. I am also unaware of any successful broad scale sterilisation programs for wild dogs in the rangelands/arid lands of Australia.
Your thoughts and perspective will be considered during the consultation of the review of the wild dog policy.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Cailin OB

17 Apr 2020

Haven’t you environment and native animals been through enough?! Let’s protect you amazing native creatures and domestic stray dogs!

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Cailin OB

17 Apr 2020

Hello Cailin

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Carole Gibbons

17 Apr 2020

Use of 1080 bait results in extreme cruelty to any animal that eats it. Due to bushfires and other environmental events such as land clearing which result in food shortages, many native animals other than dingos will eat the 1080 bait and die lingering, painful and unnecessary deaths. This will only contribute even more to native animals becoming endangered and even extinct in areas.
If you have to control native dingo populations, at least use some other, more humane method which doesn’t also kill non-target Australian native animals.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Carole Gibbons

17 Apr 2020

Hi Carole

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Please refer to previous replies re 1080 and off target species.

Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Karen Lee

17 Apr 2020

Wild dogs include domestic dogs which have strayed. I believe there should be very strict controls of domestic dogs which have strayed, but not poisoning, which is essentially baiting. Australia’s native Dingo needs to be protected as a native species deserves. If a program of control is to be implemented, the approval of veterinary services needs to sought. What is of utmost concern is animals do not suffer. A humane answer must be sought, which does not involve baiting or reckless shooting etc

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Karen Lee

17 Apr 2020

Hi Karen

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Jane Mallyon

17 Apr 2020

1080 causes a violent and painful death. Culling has been shown, time and again to be an ineffective method of population control. A holistic view, using preventative measures such as immunocontraceptives, should be taken. Otherwise this debate will only be repeated whenever a future cull is proposed.
The cruelty of poisoning with 1080 is well documented. Please consider alternative options instead of the inefficient animal abuse that is culling.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Jane Mallyon

17 Apr 2020

Hi Jane

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Please refer to previous replies re 1080, off target species and immunocontraceptives.

Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Elizabeth Reichstein

17 Apr 2020

Why must the wild dogs and dingoes inside the fence be killed, and in such a hideous and unethical manner? Death by 1080 is one of the cruelest forms of killing that you could possibly think of! Why not seek a solution that doesn't involve the slaughter of innocent animals? After all, the wild dogs are there because of careless humans. Animals are not ours to abuse and slaughter when humans deem them a pest. The greatest pest on earth is the human species! Focus on using the dog fence as a preventative measure and leave murder off the agenda please!

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Elizabeth Reichstein

17 Apr 2020

Hi Elizabeth

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Please refer to previous replies re 1080, off target species.

Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Lynda Loades > Elizabeth Reichstein

17 Apr 2020

So agree, they use our wildlife to bring tourists in a reap money off them, them when they deem them a pest want to cull, Yes humans are the cruelist animal, and some make me feel ill.

Mat Thew

17 Apr 2020

The use of 1080 baiting is not only cruel, but just plain unintelligent and potentially counter-productive.

The pain and suffering that the poison causes is well documented and doesn't need to be repeated, many others have made this point before me. However I would like to focus on the other negative impacts it presents. To drop 1080 bait onto the ground allows the opportunity for dingos to consume it, but also for other animals to consume it as well. these may be native animals, or other invasive species. If they are other invasive species then they may be killed and eaten by native predators such as owls, who will then suffer the same fate as the dingos. This is a "scatter-gun" approach with seemingly no level of accuracy, so issues of animal cruelty aside, this has the potential to damage our native environment even more.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Mat Thew

17 Apr 2020

Hello Mat

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Please refer to previous replies re 1080 and off target species.

Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Jak Schenke

17 Apr 2020

This is animal abuse! 1080 poisoning include vomiting, anxiety, disorientation and shaking.

Frantic behaviour follows - running, screaming fits, drooling at the mouth, and uncontrolled paddling and seizures for up to 12 hours. Disgusting cruelty!

Government Agency

Wild Dog Planning Officer > Jak Schenke

17 Apr 2020

Hi Jak

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator

Kristina Bogatic

17 Apr 2020

The unethical killing of wildlife using slow acting poisons is barbaric and outdated. As a veterinary student, I can’t help but question the governments will to inflict a slow painful death on sentient beings. Not only is it cruel to the animals you are targeting, but to all the unintended victims that will also come into contact with the poison. We are a developed society. It’s about time we start acting like it.

Government Agency

Wild Dog Coordination Team > Kristina Bogatic

17 Apr 2020

Hi Kristina

Thanks for your comment and perspective. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for wild dogs.

Regards
Heather Miller
State Wild Dog Coordinator