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The objectives of the draft policy are to:

  • Reduce numbers of feral deer by removing at least 40 per cent of female feral deer from all subpopulations each year.
  • Ensure boundary fences of deer farms meet appropriate construction and maintenance standards.
  • Prevent the release of deer.

The main changes proposed are:

  • Require landowners to remove at least 40 percent of female feral deer from all subpopulations each year.
  • Prohibit movement, possession and sale of deer, except by permit.
  • Permits for keeping deer will be issued by NRM boards (with assistance from PIRSA Biosecurity SA) to all deer farmers, free of charge with minimal reporting. This will exempt deer farmers from control provisions in the same way that permits for deer farmers are currently issued on Kangaroo Island.
  • Farmed deer (over 10 months of age) must have ear tags.
  • Revised minimum fencing standards will be required for new deer farms.
  • Audits of deer fences will be conducted every two years by regional DEWNR staff, and farmers will be required to keep fence maintenance logbooks.

Download the Declared Animal Policy - Feral Deer (DOC 285KB)

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Daryl Panther Victorian Wildlife Management

17 Jan 2018

Lynda, in the perfect world your right ! but sorry to say its not perfect. I've been involved with desexing kangaroos in parks where they are surrounded by housing estates, it works well for them not to have any joey's for around 8 years but has a cost of around $250 per Roo. In small scale it works but with large populations the cost and time involved would not allow it to happen. But you are right again in saying its not the deer's fault its the human's, right back from when some of the first fleet time when they brought out the deer from England, since then we have dug more dams for them to drink, grown more crops for them to eat. Now its time to control them before they eat all the food our native animals require and we loose more of them. Poisoning any animal can be slow and painful so that would not be the way to go, controlled shooting in most situations is quick, painfree and cost effective. You may noticed I used the word "control" as I believe there is room for all our existing species both native and introduced in Australia but they have to be controlled and managed.

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Lynda Loades

15 Jan 2018

Why not just desex and release, Why are you kill hungry all the time? Its not the deers fault, its human,s that are at fault.

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Annelise Wiebkin > Lynda Loades

17 Jan 2018

Dear Lynda,
Thanks for your comment and perspective. I agree, the reason that feral deer are impacting our environment and agriculture, is because humans have introduced them. Deer have been in South Australia since the late 1800s but they are now at their highest levels since introduction, and their distributions have expanded across the state. The state government has a role to help protect the environment and agriculture. Unless deer numbers can be reduced, their impacts will continue to increase.
Fertility control programs rarely reduce the population size of pest or over-abundant animals. The state government is always seeking the most humane and effective ways to reduce impacts from pest animals. Your feedback will be considered in the review of the policy for feral deer.
Regards Annelise

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Michael Stead

08 Jan 2018

Dear Dr Wiebkin,

The Nature Conservation Society of South Australia welcomes the opportunity to provide feedback on the Declared Animal Policy - Feral deer. The Society views feral and farmed deer management as an important biosecurity and conservation management issue. We applaud and wholly support the Government’s objectives and proposed policy changes in relation to deer as outlined in the policy document. We are currently preparing a formal submission .

On an unrelated note, and taking into account the theme of public comments within this forum, NCSSA does not support recreational deer hunting on public land in South Australia. We do however support the appropriate use of volunteer shooters (e.g. Sporting Shooters Association of South Australia) in coordinated pest control projects.

Best wishes and kindest regards,
Michael Stead
President - NCSSA

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Annelise Wiebkin > Michael Stead

17 Jan 2018

Hi Michael,
Thank you for your feedback, which will be considered in the review of the feral deer policy. The draft policy highlights the importance of coordinated control programs to reduce numbers of feral deer. We look forward to receiving your formal submission from the NCSSA.
Thank you in advance,
Regards, Annelise

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Daryl Panther Victorian Wildlife Management

05 Jan 2018

By looking at both proposal and feedback comments one would think we are talking about ostriches ! With the deer community saying there is not a problem with increasing numbers of feral deer in the countryside and the government saying there "will" be a problem if a few new deer getting out of enclosures. Come on guys get your head out of the sand, There is deer problems already in most states, some states like NSW and Victoria are acting and have been for some years. Deer have increase in the last 20 years and this has not been in most cases been due to escaped animals, look at the amount of wild sambar living within Australia and sambar were not farmed in any numbers. I hope the government look at what the other states have been doing, forget all these time wasting hassles with deer farmers and concentrate on lowering wild deer numbers by giving access to hunters to public land. The hunters have knowledge and find the time, the government have no money and carnt find the time.

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Annelise Wiebkin > Daryl Panther Victorian Wildlife Management

17 Jan 2018

Hello Daryl
Thanks for your feedback. The draft policy recognises that feral deer have been breeding faster than they have been controlled. The first objective of the draft policy addresses this. The first objective is to reduce the numbers of feral deer in all subpopulations. The draft policy also addresses the risks of farmed deer escaping because there is community concern about this issue as well.
Staff from our Environment Department continue to work closely with hunting and shooting groups to control feral deer in several of the parts of South Australia, where deer are impacting farmers and communities.
Regards Annelise

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Josieanne Varcoe

05 Jan 2018

In response to Mr. Charman's recent comment: The point he makes is a good one! If someone sees a deer its a talking point, but if a person dodges 3 to 4 roos a trip at night, well that's how it is & is taken as the norm.
If road safety was an issue - kangaroos would be targeted first.

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laurence charman

02 Jan 2018

there has been nention fo a survay of 500 people about wild deer.well the report i read part of shows all people survayed were from the metorpolaten area on??? why was that i wander. as a hunter i survay people my self to locate the where abouts of deer one lady said she saw wild deerevery morning going to work armed with his info i as i set off to meet the land owner looking at the padock where the lady sad she always saw the wild deer i saw 7 shetland pones. next was the cab driver he sees more deer in the forest area than NICK HARVEY eddter of the sporting shooter magzine then he tells me he saw 250 odd in only one padock but mottly in colour no spots so off i go only to find yes 250 GOATS the last chap was more to the point he was seeing one very mob off antlerless deer so off i gothinking they could have had their antlers cut for the velvet when i get there i see a small mob of alpackers so back to your point how accrat do you think your survay of city peoply only was and do bear in mind they are still looking for black panthers and taismain tigers

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Annelise Wiebkin > laurence charman

03 Jan 2018

Hello Laurence,
The phone survey targeted residents in areas where feral deer are distributed. Towns with more than 3000 residents were excluded. Of those surveyed, 90.4 per cent were from rural properties. The metropolitan area of Adelaide was not included.
Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Mary Whitehead

23 Dec 2017

All properties in our area have a few feral deer coming through, they move around constantly from property to property, to national parks, bluegum plantations and pine plantations. We can see no deer for months then they come through. Has this issue been recognised? How are the beaurocrats going to establish ownership numbers and/ or responsibility for these animals? The deer wander as freely as birds in the sky. I find it a ridiculous concept to have to kill 40% of a population of animals when they can move without restriction around most of the state.

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Annelise Wiebkin > Mary Whitehead

03 Jan 2018

Hello Mary,
Thanks for your comments. The draft policy proposes a control target for feral deer, which is required to reduce the numbers of feral deer on an on-going basis. This target is not specific to a property, but to a subpopulation (across multiple properties). This is because feral deer move across neighbouring properties, as you have mentioned. The draft policy also highlights that coordinated culling programs (across multiple properties) will be beneficial in areas where feral deer are having the greatest impacts.
Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Josieanne Varcoe

22 Dec 2017

TO SAY" if tagged farmed deer escape ,they would be defined as feral deer( under draft policy ) after 48 hours" is to intentionaly misrepresent the truth As you should be aware the current also and draft policy not only encourages illeagle hunting but assists the spread of feral deer .In response to Annelise 20 dec

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Annelise Wiebkin

22 Dec 2017

Due to the considerable interest and feedback that has been posted on this discussion page, the public consultation period has been extended to Wednesday 31 January 2018.

Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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John DeLaine

20 Dec 2017

Thankyou Dr Wiebken for the copy of the survey report. I found it difficult to even digest the very first page. Can you advise why tagged farmed fallow deer are being used as images on a feral deer paper? Furthermore, I seek advise about the centre image of deer on the front page, ie: species identity, where is it and are they even feral in SA? Why would the third image, a "feral" fallow doe have a torn ear, more correctly, perhaps it's a farmed deer with a tag torn out? It is my belief not one of these images are representative of feral deer and serves only to discredit the authors, straight-up from the title page! With such inaccuracies I can understand why, on the second page, PIRSA has inserted a disclaimer for the survey paper, even though, from what I believe, was PIRSA commissioned! As it states: "PIRSA and its employees do not warrant or make any representation regarding the use, or results of the use, of the information contained herein as regards to its correctness, accuracy, reliability and currency or otherwise", then this paper is irrelevant and must therefore be disregarded in its entirety for the purposes of deer control policy making.
Thanking you, John DeLaine.

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Annelise Wiebkin > John DeLaine

21 Dec 2017

Hello John,
It is possible that we could have selected more appropriate images for this report, but the images do not detract from the substance of this report, which is representative of the views of the South Australians who were surveyed.
Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

John DeLaine > John DeLaine

22 Dec 2017

Unfortunately, a picture tells a thousand words. With all due respect Dr Wiebken, as responsible deer farmers and processors of venison since 1977,our family have contributed to the employment of South Australians for the past 40 years, I find it rather disappointing that PIRSA has allowed a Government commissioned report to go to print with images of farmed deer with the word PEST as the description, especially so when one of the photographs is of legitimately farmed deer on our family farm and used without our knowledge or approval.
Erroneous information continues to seep into this discussion page. Another example is the recent media release of illegal hunting of deer. This is clearly at odds with the Deer Survey Analysis and furthermore has nothing to do with deer management. Illegal hunting is a matter for SAPOL, not PIRSA. To restore credibility, PIRSA must immediately call a halt to "yourSAy", cancel the final submissions date and convene a stakeholder group to collectively discuss, debate, formulate and put forward constructive deer control policy. Thanking you, John DeLaine.

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Annelise Wiebkin > John DeLaine

22 Dec 2017

Hello John,
Thanks for your feedback. I note your request to extend the consultation. We have extended the public consultation period until Wednesday 31 January 2018.

With due respect, illegal hunting is related to the review of the feral deer policy. In some parts of the South Australia, our surveys indicate that the public is becoming increasingly concerned about illegal hunting (including trespass). This concern contributes to the community’s desire to reduce the number of feral deer. Many people are fearful about speaking up about illegal hunting activities on their property, because they are worried that this may attract more illegal hunters. Illegal hunting is a matter for SAPOL, but it is also a matter for authorised officers (from the Environment Department and PIRSA), who enforce section 68B under the National Parks and Wildlife Act relating to unlawful entry onto land.

If you encounter an illegal hunter on your property, I encourage you to follow these instructions, to make it easier for the Environment Department or SAPOL to fine them under the National Parks and Wildlife Act:
- Film your discussion with the illegal hunter on your mobile phone
- Record their number plate or the serial number on their rifle
- Ask them their name and address. If all of the illegal hunters do not tell you, they have committed an offence because they are obliged to tell you.
- Ask them for written permission to be on your land. Although you have not given it to them, you should ask them anyway because this is also an offence.
- Ask them to leave. If they do not leave immediately, this is a third offence.
- Report any illegal hunters to SAPOL or through your local Natural Resources staff.

In addition, the Firearms Act contains offences that relate to the use of firearms. This Act is enforced by SAPOL.

Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Lee Williams

19 Dec 2017

Deer policy. Natural Resource Management boards may. impose conditions
recover costs

what would this policy or the authors consider would be a fair and reasonable time that conditions would be imposed, and that costs would be recovered?
has this happened to date?

and the comment ... done nothing to prevent escapes, could this be challenged,

many deer farmers, have adequate fencing, that contains their well managed, and domesticated deer. These extra rules are not necessary for contained animals and complying farmers. The issue with the feral deer problem, is the continuous non-compliance of unconfineable animals, that have a learned behaviour to ignore any type of fence, are not well managed and not domesticated.

would the 2 year, fence audit, be effective for those animals, and a landholder who has breached 2 fence audits by the policy review in 2022, what happens then?

deer tagged... All deer in SA? does this then mean ALL deer untagged with a visible at least 6x5cm in South Australia will be classified as feral deer? and therefore come under removal of at least 40% of the female deer population per year, every year.

is this also a traceback mechanism for all deer tagged, with a visible tag, with a PIC number, that has not been advised of escaping, up to 48hours of the escape. then become classified as a feral deer. does this PIC landholder then, have more regular audits on their fence?? more regular than 2 years?

Who is actually responsible for implementing this policy? who actually enforces the compliance?

The review in 2022, should also evaluate.. effective compliance enforcement... as maybe this is where the problem is for the whole community to understand, how we got to this situation.

does the policy need to address the wild deer concept? or is that only a paddock to plate phenomena, that feral deer aren't as easy to digest?
maybe the next policy could consider the sale of illegal animal meat?

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Annelise Wiebkin > Lee Williams

20 Dec 2017

Dear Lee,
Thanks again for your feedback. Cost recovery for control of feral deer is a provision under the NRM Act. Compliance processes, including cost recovery, are overseen by the Environment Department. The mention of "done nothing to prevent escapes" is in relation to NRM boards being able to recover costs of recapturing or destroying escaped deer ONLY when the deer keeper has done nothing to prevent these escapes, and it can be demonstrated that the escape is the result of a deliberate or negligent act.

Fence audits are currently done each 2 years. The Authorised Officers who conduct them require that any maintenance is done as soon as possible. Authorised Officers have a process, by which they work with farmers to ensure fence breaches are mended.

The draft policy proposes that feral deer that those that are not tagged (if over 10 months of age) or confined by fences, or belong to a registered herd under the Livestock Regulations 2013. Landholders (public and private) would be required (under the draft policy) to control these, according to the target. The draft policy proposes that farmed deer (not feral deer) are those confined on land that is registered to keep deer and which have visible ear tag (if over 10 months).

If tagged farmed deer escape, they would be defined as feral (under the draft policy) after 48 hours.
Thanks again for your comments.
Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Annelise Wiebkin > Lee Williams

21 Dec 2017

Hi Lee,
Further to my comment above, compliance processes, including cost recovery, are implemented by the local NRM Board, and supported by the Environment Department.

Also you asked about when “conditions [of the final policy] would be imposed”. The proposed fencing standards would be applicable only to newly registered deer farms, not existing ones. Other proposals, such as the requirement for all farmed deer (over the age of 10 months) to be tagged with visible ear tags, would be applicable to existing and new deer farms.

Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

Lee Williams > Lee Williams

21 Dec 2017

Thanks Annelise,

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Josieanne Varcoe

19 Dec 2017

does the community survey of 500 people mention illegal hunting as a problem

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Annelise Wiebkin > Josieanne Varcoe

20 Dec 2017

Hi Josieanne,
The survey (from respondents in 4 Natural Resource Management regions) found:
"The main perceived impact of feral deer is as a minor traffic hazard (44.8% of responses). 28.8% of respondents also consider them a major traffic hazard. A low proportion of respondents consider feral deer to have a major negative impact on illegal hunting risk (12.8%)."
A separate survey was done in the South East NRM region, which found that illegal hunting was the second most important issue for survey respondents, and that there was a 25 to 42 per cent increase in the number of people who said illegal hunting was an issue (on private land, roadsides and public land)
I can email you a copy of the survey report if you provide me with your email address (via YourSAY, or via PIRSA.NRMBIOSECURITY@sa.gov.au).
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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John DeLaine

19 Dec 2017

To Dr Annelise Wiebki. Can you please release the "recent community survey of 500 people in areas where deer are distributed" for peer review?

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Annelise Wiebkin > John DeLaine

20 Dec 2017

Hello John,
I can email you a copy of the survey report if you provide me with your email address (via YourSAY, or via PIRSA.NRMBIOSECURITY@sa.gov.au).
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

John DeLaine > John DeLaine

20 Dec 2017

Good afternoon Dr Wiebken, Please forward the survey report to venison@optusnet.com.au Thanking you, John DeLaine

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Josieanne Varcoe

18 Dec 2017

Trying to leave a comment in the 'Leave a comment' section proved to be difficult and extremely time consuming!
Jeff & Josie Varcoe.

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Josieanne Varcoe

18 Dec 2017

After 60 years of being obsessed with deer, nearly 40 years involved with farming deer, and involved with the hunting scene for 30 years, and being a part of all committees and associations with I take a very strong interest with this report. Having spent considerable amount of time reading trying to submit a contribution and talking to fellow deer farmers it seems as if we all have something to be very worried about. The suggestion is that Appendix 2 is totally unworkable, will be ineffective and will cause considerable grief.
Having read and discussed the rest of the report, it is obvious that there is ONLY one sensible and workable solution!
This report must be put in abeyance and reconvene the S.E. National Resource Management Board Deer Advisory Committee, who has had extensive experience and knowledge in deer matters over a long period of time. This would make sure that land holders, who through no fault of their own, are not hunting hit with extremely expensive compliance orders and deer farmers who have caused absolutely no problems will not be hit with expensive debilitating renovations.
The real problems can only be addressed with the knowledge and expertise from local people and not by experts.
The date for comment, which coincides with peoples most busy and exhausting agricultural time, as well as the Christmas and New Year holiday period. Most people, who should be taking an active interest may not know of this report's existence.
It appears that the main avenue of consultation and input into this report is via this site online. Many people find this avenue not only extremely difficult to access and also totally out of their field of expertise. Thus those that should be having the greatest input are not able to have any.
Subsequently the deadline date of January the 9th 2018 is going to be well before interested groups can complete their meetings.
Compliance Orders that could be a result of ongoing legislation no doubt would be absolutely devastating to innocent farmers and landholders.
Once again, we all say, FIX THE PROBLEM! This can only happen with the resurrection of the D.A.C. who can advise on regulations that will fix the problem.
This will ultimately cost all farmers a great deal of time and money and not achieve its aim.
Jeff & Josie Varcoe.

laurence charman > Josieanne Varcoe

19 Dec 2017

yes josie i fully agree the draft police has not been present to the public very well only making statements with no facts or everdence (white tail deer)as usual govment soluctions are very coastly inaficent and inafectif one or two trips to the bush dose not make you a wild life expert or wild life manger these people (goverment experts) can and will make matters warrs than they are now.

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John DeLaine

14 Dec 2017

It appears the forum is heavily biased toward hunting rather than dealing with constructive deer control policy. Many of the statements are subjective, generalised and clearly lack science based evidence, as does the draft policy. Appendix 2 of the policy is unworkable and reveals deficiencies in knowledge. I suggest Biosecurity should demonstrate leadership by reinstating the Deer Advisory Group to assist working through the draft policy in an objective manner.

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Annelise Wiebkin > John DeLaine

20 Dec 2017

Hello John,
Thank you for your comments, which will be considered in finalising the declared animal policy on feral deer, and future management plans for control of feral deer. We would appreciate specific suggestions on the fence standards in Appendix 2. The target required to reduce deer numbers on an ongoing basis is from a peer reviewed study by Hone et al. 2010 (referenced in the draft policy). Other proposals in the draft policy are informed by a perceptions survey of more than 500 people in South Australia, in areas where deer are found. I can email you a copy of the survey report if you provide me with your email address (via YourSAY, or via PIRSA.NRMBIOSECURITY@sa.gov.au).
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Patrick Ross

14 Dec 2017

The proposed policy is only for guidance in regard to wild and farmed deer, it is not a legislative requirement. Is this a correct statement in regard to the proposed policy on deer?

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Annelise Wiebkin > Patrick Ross

14 Dec 2017

Hello Patrick,
Thanks for your feedback. Following the public consultation period, feedback on the draft policy will be addressed, and a final policy will be drafted. The final policy will outline the legislation (law) in relation to how feral deer must be managed. The policy will sit under the NRM Act, and all legislation that is specified in the policy (sections of the Act, regulations, determinations and permits) can be legally enacted or enforced. The policy will be a summary of the legislation relevant to feral deer.

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions.

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Graham Thomas

08 Dec 2017

As part of the local Friends group it should be noted that the damage caused to re-vegetation by feral deer in the Onkaparinga NP is conservatively calculated in the thousands of dollars. All deer in NPs should be humanely culled to facilitate the ongoing improvement to both remnant vegetation and new plantings.

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Annelise Wiebkin > Graham Thomas

08 Dec 2017

Hi Graham,
Thanks for your feedback and knowledge of impacts by feral deer in the Onkaparinga National Park. The draft policy aims to reduce these impacts. The draft highlights the required amount of control (at least 40 per cent of females each year) to achieve on going decline. Land managers (public and private) may chose to do more than this amount of control to reduce feral deer numbers more quickly.
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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laurence charman

07 Dec 2017

coment toBrian Boyed about w.t. deer the animals you are refuring to were the propity of the adialade and melborn zoo in s,a it was at penola at the propety of robert rimeld he was a director of the adialade zoo he had 3 deer i think they were there to recover from being foot soar arfter being on concret to long it was a zoo recover area i beleave the deer died there some 30 year ago. the area at gellong was run by the melborn zoo. just letting you know the facts so or goverment friends dont get it wrong again.

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Annelise Wiebkin > laurence charman

08 Dec 2017

Hello Laurence,
Thank you for your information and local knowledge.
Regards Annelise Wiebkin
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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laurence charman

05 Dec 2017

road safty has been throw in just to confuss the issu .the speed limet is to be reduced on the claywells rd. due to deer numbers i travel this road twice a week and in the passed 3 years have only sean signs of 4 deeer been hit but many many roos ,walibes and emews, on the cooronge rd. out of kingston the odd deer many roos ,walbies and many wonbats but no one ceares about the wombats on one trip i counted 42 aservay was done about 5 years ago and it went 19 to 1that was 19roos to one deer

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Annelise Wiebkin > laurence charman

08 Dec 2017

Hello Laurence,
A recent community survey of 500 people in areas where deer are distributed, sought feedback on people’s perceptions of impacts of feral deer. Almost three quarters of respondents thought that feral deer were a major or minor traffic hazard, or would be if populations increased. Records of traffic accidents involving animals indicate that the large majority are due to collisions with kangaroos, but many South Australians still have concerns that deer pose a traffic hazard. There is a low risk of hitting a deer in a vehicle, but a collision with a deer may result in human fatalities or serious injury.
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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laurence charman

05 Dec 2017

eradication can be atticeved that is why some deer are now extinked around the wourld also in the u.s.a.whitle tail were nealy wipped out through over hunting but getting back to the draft police you are putting wild deer and farmed deer in the same barsket where they are living in two totale diffrent situations (e.g)exarmpel this is like saying chickings lay eggs.fact crocadiles lay eggs fact lets cover them in the one policy yes its stupid to say but this is excatly what the goverment is doing with deer. and one more point there is no repeat no wild white tail deer in australia execpt in the zoos...this just goes to showth is policy has been put to geather by cutting and pasting from the internet with very little knolage of the ture facts

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Annelise Wiebkin > laurence charman

08 Dec 2017

Hello Laurence,
Thanks for your feedback. The draft policy aims to reduce the number of feral deer in the wild and their associated impacts. There is concern in the community that some farmed deer have escaped farms in the past and that these deer have contributed to the feral deer population. This draft policy only addresses the construction and maintenance of boundary fences to reduce the risks of deer escaping, and tagging of farmed deer to improve recovery of deer if they do escape, so they do not become feral . The draft policy does not address other aspects of deer farms. The main focus of the draft policy is increasing control of feral deer in the wild.
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Josieanne Varcoe

05 Dec 2017

can the authors please tell us were to find appendix 1 please

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Annelise Wiebkin > Josieanne Varcoe

08 Dec 2017

Hello Jeff.
Thank you. You have highlighted an editing error in the draft policy. In the section on “prevent farmed deer from escaping”, the draft policy refers to Appendix 1 instead of Appendix 2. These editing errors will be amended following the consultation period. The appendices are at the end of the draft policy document. Appendix 1 is a distribution map of feral deer in South Australia. Appendix 2 outlines proposed boundary fence construction and maintenance standards for deer enclosures on registered properties.
Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Josieanne Varcoe

05 Dec 2017

can the authors please tell us were to find appendage 1 please

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Josieanne Varcoe

04 Dec 2017

as was expected this in no way addressrs main problem but just finds asoft target will give them asound flogging others to suffer at no fault of thiers is land owners who at no fault of thiershave deer they dont want stupid govt regulations at the root of the problem are left un changed deer the deer farmers that have caused no problems are left stressed fighting dracomeing regulations that wont solve the problem you know what the problem is fix it you have knoen for at least ten years this is no better than a smoke screen to hide govt in ability to solve problem this is not just ahunting issue

Lee Williams > Josieanne Varcoe

04 Dec 2017

Thankyou Jeff,
your honest view of the matter is refreshing, landowners with the imposition of feral deer (who don't want feral deer, and who do not want to make a business out of feral deer, who want to protect the farm and native environment that they take responsibility of) have concerns about biosecurity problems of the future, have concerns of costs of dealing with the problem, and I think farmers would like to see real leadership as they are expected to continue to carry the load. this is not a quick fix problem, but making a good start on it should be sooner rather than later.

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Josieanne Varcoe

08 Dec 2017

Thank you Lee for your perspectives on the current and future impacts of feral deer for landowners (public and private). Leadership and collaboration is required in our combined efforts to reduce deer numbers.
Hello Jeff,
You highlight that this is not just an issue about access for recreational hunting. The draft policy is not about addressing access for recreational hunting. We hope to receive more feedback on the status of feral deer and the aims of the draft policy as well. The draft policy aims to reduce the environmental, economic and social impacts of feral deer. It stipulates the amount of control required to reduce the number of feral deer, and fencing required to stop farmed deer from escaping and contributing to the feral population.
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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laurence charman

29 Nov 2017

over the last 25 years or so the s.a. landscape has changed dramatlicle,farm propityes have been broute up and planted with blue gums accros the hole state farmers are removed. they are the land mangers of wild life and vermin when deer were only living on a historic proptie they would haved lived hiden away in the bush to the rear of the proptery now it is all forest. trees are planted from the back fence to the frount fence less the fire break the deer are now protected by the forest and can move freely in the cover of the forest,.also this puts the vermin roos deer etc on to the road side to feed as they do in the pine forist .and may i add the planting of blue gumms was subised by the govermen t with no checks or controls. now the blue gumms are beeing harvest in a big way alot of the problem will be quickly be redueced by a natural harvest by land owners and hunters

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > laurence charman

08 Dec 2017

Hi Laurence,
Thanks for your feedback. As you point out, the landscape has changed in some places. Some areas have become more wooded and others have become more open. One of the changes we have seen in recent decades is that feral deer have spread into areas where they were not found 10 or more years ago. This trend is likely to continue if deer numbers are not heavily controlled. We are seeking feedback on whether the community supports the aim of the draft policy: to reduce the number of feral deer in South Australia.
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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