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The objectives of the draft policy are to: 

  • Reduce numbers of feral pigs by removing at least 60 per cent of feral pigs from all established populations each year. 
  • Prevent domestic pigs from escaping into the wild. 
  • Prevent the release of domestic and feral pigs. 

The main elements of this new draft policy are: 

  • Remove at least 60 per cent of feral pigs from all established populations each year. 
  • Prohibit the movement, possession and sale of feral pigs (note that domestic pigs have a separate declaration prohibiting their release). 
  • Require the public to notify NRM authorities of feral pigs (except on Kangaroo Island). 
  • Escaped domestic pigs are immediately classified as feral if they escape, and they must be destroyed if they stray from the property that is registered to keep them. 

Download the Declared Animal Policy - Feral Pigs (DOC 570KB)

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Lynda Loades

15 Jan 2018

As humans are at fault here and not the pigs, i suggest you desex and release. Stop with the killings as your only disision all the time. Release where they cant do harm to enviorment, Same goes for most animals that are dumped ect.

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Annelise Wiebkin > Lynda Loades

17 Jan 2018

Hi Lynda,
Thanks for your comments. It is true, feral pigs were introduced to Australia by people. They have thrived in other states, and bred to very high numbers. They also have significant impacts on native plants, wetlands, grasslands, forests, culturally important bush foods, native animals and young lambs. They can spread plant and animal diseases, cause soil erosion and reduce water quality. The total numbers of feral pigs in South Australia are small (estimated to be 3000-6000) and we have an opportunity to stop the spread of feral pigs while populations are small, to protect the environment and agriculture.
Fertility control programs rarely stop the growth of pest animal populations. The state government is always seeking the most humane and effective ways to reduce or prevent impacts of pest animals.
Regards Annelise

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Michael Stead

08 Jan 2018

Dear Dr Wiebkin,

The Nature Conservation Society of South Australia welcomes the opportunity to provide feedback on the Declared Animal Policy - Feral pigs. The Society views feral pig management as an important biosecurity and conservation management issue. We applaud and wholly support the Government’s objectives and proposed policy changes in relation to feral pigs as outlined in the policy document. We are currently preparing a formal submission.

Best wishes and kindest regards,
Michael Stead
President - NCSSA

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Michael Stead

17 Jan 2018

Hi Michael,
Thanks for your feedback and we look forward to a submission from the NCSSA.
Regards Annelise

Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Barry Kelly

02 Jan 2018

I support the new legislation fully, feral pigs have become established in SA due to lack of legislation.
However as pigs will roam as far as they need to, how will you measure the pigs that belong to an individual property, when the same pigs can be travelling over several properties each night.
I was the project coordinator in the 2010 Riverland project and that approach was successful because we managed the project without boundaries, this approach has now been duplicated in NSW, currently we are doing a project on the Lower Lachlan River using exactly the same principle that pigs are different to rabbits, weeds etc as they don't have boundaries.
If forced most landholders will get in pig hunters or ground shoot themselves as a cheap option, pushing the pigs next door and this will allow the continuing expansion of feral pigs, landholders do not have the knowledge and skills in SA to effectively control feral pigs as it's new to them, landholders in NSW still can't. Look at the success they have had on Kangaroo Island after spending millions of dollars, and their still are pigs there.
Our biggest problem is the illegal deliberate release by pig hunters.
To prevent feral pigs becoming established throughout SA it must be coordinated by the NRM and control done by the NRM utilising the Levy and other funding, if funding given to landholders or community groups the pigs will win.
The Regional Implementation Chart, I don't understand why you can't eradicate the pigs from Kangaroo Island ? Northern and Yorke and the South East should be eradicate, Arid Lands should be the same as The SA Murray Darling Basin, "Destroy populations - Eradicate new incursions"
It's a great start, good that we can all have a say, everyone has different views and ideas and debate respectfully is a great idea, well done.

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Barry Kelly

03 Jan 2018

Hello Barry,
Thanks for your useful input, experience and ideas. The draft feral pig policy specifies control targets that are required to reduce numbers on an on-going basis. These are not targets at the property level, but across landscapes and populations. Where these areas are near State borders, control efforts will benefit from cross border collaboration. As you highlighted, coordinated control efforts are required across boundaries, and there are a range of ways to do this, depending on local communities, pig numbers, terrain and other environmental conditions.
Regarding your comment about landholder experience or skills, the draft policy seeks to improve awareness of the impacts of feral pigs and the methods of control. The draft policy also highlights the need for coordinated surveillance to ensure early responses to new incursions.
Thank you,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Anne McInnes

17 Dec 2017

Hope some lessons can be learnt from the deer culls and the camel culls before them. It's easy to look at impressive numbers of animals shot without looking at what happens to the ones that weren't shot. The hunters (including the helicopter hunters) cant and dont get all of the animals they encounter. They scatter them far and wide. It always seems to be at a time when the scattered animals have access to plenty of food and water in every direction. It makes no sense to persuade the remaining animals to establish themselves in places where they haven't been before. If pigs are following ephemeral waterways west from the Riverland then the time to get them is when most of the waterholes are dry. There's sound thinking behind the Aboriginal saying "if you want to catch a kangaroo wait by a dam." None of them can live without water. The time to use over excited hunters and heliciopters is when its hot and dry and the scattered animals are clustering around whatever feed and new water points they've found. Not in annual shooting sprees for a few days in springtime. By waiting until hot and dry and watching for tracks and continuously getting the animals returning to water.

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Anne McInnes

22 Dec 2017

Hello Anne,
Thanks for your feedback and ideas. Management plans will be important to outline where and when coordinated control efforts should be focused, to minimise risks of feral pig populations establishing elsewhere.
Regards,
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

Barry Kelly > Anne McInnes

02 Jan 2018

Anne, I totally agree with what you say about the timing and over use of helicopter shooting, it is one of the least effective ways to reduce pig numbers and how many shot does not matter at all, its the numbers left behind, and aerial shooting does scatter them and if they have access to water, even a trough they are staying out in those areas and adapting. No area should ever be aerial shot if it hasn't been baited to reduce numbers first. One thing I do disagree with is aerial shoot when its hot, pigs are not active during the day when hot, they are curled up under cover and go to water at night, helicopters can't shoot at night, our project has done a shoot last August when cool and had far better results as pigs were out and about during the day, and then we bait near the water points during summer when all other resources are scarce.

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Anne McInnes

03 Jan 2018

Hi Barry,
Thanks for your helpful comments on effective control techniques, to inform the draft policy and future management plans.
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Lee Williams

27 Nov 2017

Feral pigs....... I can only imagine how the environment would look with feral pigs in it. pigs/deer both these policy drafts do need to reflect the ability these animals have of adapting and changing our natural and agricultural environment. assistance from all stakeholders towards eradication, and serious effort to reduction to a level that will result in no loss, or minimal loss to farm productivity, and natural flora and fauna environments is a must. introduced species can change a landscape. Landholders again are given the full responsibility in this policy.

Government Agency

Annelise Wiebkin > Lee Williams

08 Dec 2017

Hi Lee,
Thanks for your feedback on the impacts of feral pigs to the natural and agricultural environment. The draft policy does require that landholders (both private and public land managers) are responsible for destroying feral pigs on their land. Coordinated surveillance and control across landscapes and stakeholders helps share the load and is the best approach for eradicating incursions of feral pigs.
Regards
Dr Annelise Wiebkin
Biosecurity Policy Officer
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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Matthew Godson

16 Nov 2017

Landholders experiencing feral pig impacts can utilise the free community pest control program 'SSAA Farmer Assist'. Services are provided by licensed, accredited and insured volunteers. More info can be found by visiting the website https://www.farmerassist.com.au

Kate Husband > Matthew Godson

16 Nov 2017

Hi Matthew
Thank you for your information on the SSAA Farmer Assist program. Staff from our Environment Department continue to work closely with hunting and shooting groups to control feral animals in several of the parts of South Australia, where they are impacting farmers and communities.
Hunting of feral animals in South Australia is confined mainly to private property where you have been given written permission to hunt by the landowner. This permission must have been given within the previous six months. Hunting permits are available from DEWNR (http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/managing-natural-resources/plants-and-animals/permits-and-licences/Native_animals_in_the_wild/Hunting_Permits).
With a basic Hunting Permit (and written permission of the land owner) you can hunt feral animals such as:
• deer
• rabbits
• foxes
• goats
• pigs.
A basic Hunting Permit does not allow you to take:
• protected animals (eg kangaroos)
• domestic stock.

Kate Husband
Communications Manager, Primary Industries
Primary Industries and Regions SA

Matthew Godson > Matthew Godson

17 Nov 2017

Hi Kate
Yes the SSAA Conservation and Wildlife Management Branch has been working with state agencies since the 1990s controlling feral animals on public land. Our Farmer Assist program now offers a service for individual landholders to find volunteers to undertake pest control on their behalf.

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Ruth Roberts

06 Nov 2017

Noticing an increase in feral pigs between Renmark and the border and they are moving closer to Renmark. We're happy to report sightings if required

Kate Husband > Ruth Roberts

07 Nov 2017

Hi Ruth
Many thanks for your feedback. Please report any feral pig sightings via FERAL PIG SCAN
https://www.feralscan.org.au/feralpigscan/map.aspx

Also if you would like more information on best practice feral pig management you can download our Pests Cost Us All project workshop module below.

http://pir.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/297971/Best_practice_feral_pig_management_module.pdf

Kate Husband
Communications Manager, Primary Industries
Primary Industries and Regions SA

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