Better outcomes

How can we use our current homes and housing system to deliver better outcomes?

Join the discussion below.

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Debra Simmons

30 Aug 2019

Instead of concentrating on building a bigger Adelaide, start utilising other towns that could be made into tiny cities. Choose areas that have adequate rainfall and soil. The South East, southern York peninsula and southern Eyre Peninsula could be expanded. Shifting people to Whyalla has failed because the climate is unsuitable. Make buying a house in those areas easier eg. by lowering the minimum HomeStart deposit to 5% like it is in Whyalla, Berri and Mount Gambier. If those people who are renting in Adelaide because they can't afford to buy, were given more chances to own, it would free up more rental properties.

Emma O'Halloran

30 Aug 2019

The selling of South Australian homes creates a unique opportunity for a new funding stream to be brought into the social and affordable housing sector, through an involvement with the Homes for Homes initiative.
How? Every South Australian homeowner that registers their property with Homes for Homes promises to make a small tax-deductable donation when they sell their property. Donation raised in South Australia are then invested into increasing the supply of housing for South Australians in need.
Once a home is registered it continues participating in Homes for Homes, encouraging all future homeowners to also consider donating when they sell in the future.
The idea of using the selling of houses to generate a new fundraising stream was based on a similar, successful initiative seen operating in the US. Lennnar, a single property developer from California, encouraged in excess of 20,000 property owners to make a small contribution at their time of sale. Our understanding is now, twenty years on, funds raised from this initiative is approaching $10m, supporting local homelessness initiatives.
The Homes for Homes initiative can be applied to the entire housing system, from existing dwellings, to new developments, including Government housing stock as the core premise is simple, encourage small donations on property sales, which accumulates millions into the future.

David Thackrah

28 Aug 2019

Rent cost as share of income is critical and more housing could be organised via sub committee working groups based with Councils. New tenants could be guided to use their new location wisely and contribute to the neighbourhood. There is a problem with putting down people in a new suburb away from everything they are familiar with. Possibly some people would find living in a country centre might suit their family needs. However as a population we must completely review all available vacant properties ensuring the management thereof is coordinated across the regions and suburbs. Local Councils could keep alerted to vacant properties where security issues arise as one reason. The properties within their boundaries could be observed and that occupants were settled and contributing to the neighbourhood.

Miriam Smith

21 Aug 2019

There has been a lot of changes in the commercial property market with changes in traditional industries across SA with modern Tech. As a result there are many commercial properties that remain empty for years. Make changes in Development Plans and Zoning to allow residential or mixed use so this floor space can be refitted for adaptable housing! You don’t have to pay for land, only floor space. Focus should not just be on old warehouses that are demolished etc but also smaller neighbourhood and suburban areas in business districts that are now all empty with “for lease” signs over them. A new way of structuring lease/rent agreements will need to be explored. Rossdale Homes at Fullarton have built a ‘home’ in their commercial building - it works and only a fraction of the cost. These can be versatile pop-up homes that can be stripped out at a later date if needed. Otherwise let’s have a inclusive look at how ALL available buildings can be used. Check out what is possible.

Christine Rivers

02 Aug 2019

Incentives for homeowners with large properties to subdivide. Encourage families to remain together, grandparents, younger members of the family in the subdivision. We need more room for families than the small handkerchief size of the current houses built on tiny tiny tiny lots.

Build better moderate density housing in all suburbs, that means up to 3-floor apartment blocks - again with green and recreational spaces.

develop business, health services and infrastructure in smaller towns to encourage people to live there.

Create opportunities for lower-income families for buy-to-rent homes.

Strategise across all forms of housing to find improvements. How can current solutions such as the rental market, caravan parks be optimised to create better and longer-term housing (?)

Seriously consider connections between (the much larger than the government will admit) underemployed labour market and unstable housing. Address the adequate wage and secure employment issue.

Consider taking advice from those who are successful at the solutions of housing:

https://www.housinginternational.coop/news/european-collaborative-housing-awards/
https://www.sverigesallmannytta.se/in-english/public-housing-in-sweden/
https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/scandinavian-sustainable-housing-29976097
https://www.ahuri.edu.au/policy/ahuri-briefs/what-is-the-right-level-of-social-housing

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Christine Rivers

05 Aug 2019

Good morning Christine,
We appreciate your feedback on this topic. Thank you.

Kim de bruis

02 Aug 2019

I was a broke welfare recipient, domestic violence, single parent caring for chronically ill child who moved into community housing.
I would identify 3 essential elements that have been the stepping stones to becoming a functional member of society.
I work and pay tax. I belong to a church community and volunteer. My employment is with disability.
My point being; lifting vulnerable people lifts all of society - 3 key steps up for me was 1. Dirt cheap rent; based on my means. It increased v slowly the same rate as my progress. Secure housing was a stabilising anchor on which many other stabilising elements were founded like..2. community. I found community in church. My mental and emotional health and social integration was developed in relationships made and sense of belonging found in community.
3. centrelink was my financial lifeline and only access to many assistance agencies. When centrelink has empathy and foresight and runs efficiently it lifts the burden of the most vulnerable-bottom of the heap citizens and the whole standard of living raises for all.
when it functions badly it creates barriers for the impoverished. Denying access to money and other services, punitive and demoralising, it exacerbates mental, emotional, social deterioration.
Its virtually pointless improving availability & affordability of housing without melding and locking in the issues of welfare and social inclusion/community.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Kim de bruis

05 Aug 2019

Hi Kim,
Appreciate your thoughtful comments and input on this topic - thank you.

Alice Clark

26 Jul 2019

Emergency accommodation – There is not enough emergency accommodation to meet demand, evidenced by the growth in the use and cost of motels. State Government should increase the number of crisis beds available in Adelaide, Greater Adelaide and the regions.

Rooming houses – State Government must better regulate rooming houses to ensure vulnerable residents have access to their legal rights and adequate support to participate in social and economic life.

Supported accommodation – There is not enough supported accommodation to meet demand and State Government should invest in at least one more purpose-built rooming house to replicate The Terraces, to be operated by a not for profit. Ideally, each region would have a similar accommodation option.

Social housing – There is not enough social housing to meet demand and State Government must invest in social housing over the next 30 years to address the gap between demand and supply so that we can reduce the number of people experiencing homelessness.

Private rental – The cost of private rental is out of reach of thousands of South Australian families who require social housing. State Government should strengthen renter protections, continue to provide bond guarantees to people living on low incomes and consider creating a scheme that incentivises landlords to rent to people living on low incomes.

Empty residential properties – State Government to explore how to incentivise landlords to rent empty investment properties to renters living on low incomes.

Empty commercial properties – State Government to explore how underutilised commercial spaces could be activated to provide shelter to people experiencing homelessness.

Home ownership – State Government to develop with Homestart, a new banking product for households in the bottom two income quintiles, to make home ownership a possibility and review the Affordable Homes Program to increase its uptake by people living on low incomes.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Alice Clark

26 Jul 2019

Thank you for your feedback Alice.

Lesley Flora

25 Jul 2019

I'm worried about sustainability, apartments going up for overseas students, like the highrise in Whitmore Square, all Chinese tenants, 22 stories and doesnt help us aussies, just the O/S students that have rich families, I'm sick to death of it. SLOW DOWN IMMIGRATION, we dont want to have 3 million people in Adelaide, where is all this water coming from? Hospital rampings are already commonplace, I'M SICK OF IT, we're going backwards in my books. The amount of homeless is increasing and it's appalling, should not be happening in this day and age, most need mental facilities, WHICH there is not nearly enough of. I support a call for a register of people that trash houses, they dont deserve public housing, they need to lift their game, I have no mercy for them. Highrise living is NOT acceptable, go live in the UK for a while and see what the tenants think of it, standards are slipping big time, the country is going down the toilet - STOP OVERDEVELOPMENT, bottom line, I dont want to live in a rat cage. Seems these days it's all about rights and no responsibility, that includes government, sucking the workers dry, to me tax is theft and inflation is too as it's wasted on consultants that we dont need, just common sense, wonder whose mates backs are getting scratched there, that's what politics shows me, doesnt get better, just mates get richer, what a sham, a bit like foreign aid, no accountability, makes rich people in poor countries richer, FACT.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Lesley Flora

26 Jul 2019

Hi Lesley,
Thanks for input.

David Thackrah > Lesley Flora

28 Aug 2019

I agree. Creating ghetto type accomodation for like speaking foreigners fractures our Australian Way. If a student from elsewhere enjoys our education, health and defence protection systems they should be working at integrating into Australian daily activities. I see too many young foreigners here to set up a landing base for extended family immigration . Even with cases of cash! Unfortunately our Immigration Dept. Has been minimised and the long gained skill base is much reduced compared to a decade ago.

Di DeLaine

24 Jul 2019

The waiting lists are way too long, there are houses unoccupied awaiting maintenance and all this is largely due to aging houses and lack of government funding. A previous scheme had government paying the owner to build a house and rent at affordable prices. The result was very poorly built houses (poor building finish, no insulation, on outskirts of the city). There needs to be standards for housing if such a scheme was introduced again. Minimum heating and cooling standards. Better quality control.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Di DeLaine

25 Jul 2019

Hello Di,
Thank you for your input on this matter today.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Di DeLaine

25 Jul 2019

Thanks for your response Di.

Gail Stead

24 Jul 2019

The biggest complaint I have is their is no thorough vetting system to put the right tenant in with the right area or other tenants and no support for either,its like living in hell and only the strongest will survive,they wipe their hands and say we have done what we can to find people homes,without consideration for the future prospects of all concerned,please bring back the people who had common sense and duty to responsibility for what they do

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Gail Stead

25 Jul 2019

Thank you for your constructive feedback and input Gail.

Gail Stead

24 Jul 2019

The saddest part also is that good tenants are being punished by living in sub standard homes that have never been repaired, they used to come and fix and paint outside every 6 years inside and every 7 years outside, now I've waited on this list for over 20 years to get cracks that I can put my finger in and see daylight, the excuse is that they have no money due to repairs for bad tenants abuse,if you ask them , if the bother to return your call the buck is passed to HSA Maintenance,why ,they make the excuse yes we know but you are on a list ,they think we are fools , we know that anything surrounding the cbd is prime location so they are trying to get tenants out not keep them in. As the land is worth more to them especially older homes that have big blocks.

Lesley Flora > Gail Stead

25 Jul 2019

Agreed, so they can overdevelop the land and have us all living in a rat's cage, appalling

Gail Stead

24 Jul 2019

Stop ripping down Hosing trust homes and selling them off to developers, I agree the HSA was brilliant for 30 years ,but sadly the decline in staff that are willing to actually take responsibility for extremely bad tenants is unbelievable, we all pay in some form or other for that lack. they hide behind numbers and answering machines and rarely return calls let alone come out and investigate. its left up to tenants and private owner to contact police and do their job,if this was done on a regular basis their would be less damages to clean up and less excuses,the rule also needs to change not 3 warnings and then take them to sacat, it should be three serious police reports and yr out. When you have 30 police reports from private , business and other tenants and some extremely serious and over 15 official complaints no excuses should be made and no chances given. Its not a given right to destroy homes or peoples lives. As for the excuse of pulling down and leaving vacant land for years and private developers to replace every second house that has not happened and until that does and stops being a cash cow for HSA and Renewal SA we will have the long list of people in desperate need of homes

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Gail Stead

25 Jul 2019

Hi Gail,
Thanks for your responses on this topic.

Mark Russ > Gail Stead

27 Jul 2019

Agreed. I live in public housing (which I'm extremely grateful for), two doors down from a meth head that believes that the entire block is his to terrorise the tenants with. The rear landing of the units is full of broken glass from his outbursts. He boots his front door from the inside at all hours of the day and night, when he feels like it. Yells barely coherent abuse. Etc.

Got to the point of being ready to become homeless to avoid being terrorised by him any more. Took recordings of the yelling, glass smashing, door kicking, had to call the cops twice in 24 hours at one stage. I took it all to my housing SA office, and with all the evidence, nothing's been done. I don't even believe that he's been spoken to about it. Definitely no chance of having this grubby, bitter, psychopath. He makes everyone's life hell. People are too afraid to put a formal complaint in. I've told them this. Nothing has been done about it. They just don't care. If they did, they don't have the staffing resources let aline the housing stock to play musical chairs woth tenants that dont deserve a roof over their heads. If they're going to act like the tenant described above, they should be evicted, let alone rehoused somewhere else, just to make whoever's life around them, hell there instead.

Mark Russ > Gail Stead

27 Jul 2019

And I live in a reputable suburb.

Lisa King

11 Jul 2019

Have a rental scheme that lowers costs like Nras, but pays the entire rent, then collects the rent from the tenant. Owners may be more likely to rent because it's GUARANTEED money every week, the government agencies don't skip out. With added bonuses of the housing standard being met, and monitored, but also monitored bond refunds, it also allows those not being given a chance a way to earn back a good rental history, and for that matter a better sense of self.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Lisa King

25 Jul 2019

Hi Lisa,
Thanks for your comment.

John Piovesan

10 Jul 2019

Having been in the Homelessness sector I have observed how a number of my clients were from interstate. They may have perceived that our services are better here, particularly if they have come from regional or remote areas ie Northern WA, NT, Northern Vic. This puts additional pressure on services in Adelaide. I suspect that we do not have as many going the other way. I know initiatives like Project Zero had been reducing rough sleeping but then it has spiked again. Interstate transfer may have been a factor and the question needs to be asked. The only exception ought to be with DV. If we don't do this we will be punished by having more people crossing the border to access services. If it is proven that there is an imbalance, those states that are picking up those extra people need to be rewarded financially. The answer would be better regional services in those states.

John Piovesan > John Piovesan

10 Jul 2019

Not just in Housing but Mental Health as well.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > John Piovesan

25 Jul 2019

Hi John,
Thank you for providing your feedback on this issue.

Joel Dignam

08 Jul 2019

Making rental laws fairer for people who rent would go a long way towards improving housing for private tenants. It could give people greater security of tenure and make it easier for them to have well-maintained, safe, properties.

Mark Russ > Joel Dignam

27 Jul 2019

This. With the cost of living getting worse and worse, a single person is finding it harder and harder to be able to afford to rent their own unit/home. More share houses are available then ever before, which is not anywhere near as safe or as functional as would be if the renter had their own abode.

More rights for tenants that rent, is extremely important. There needs to be legislation brought in as soon as possible, to make all tenancies in share houses, have to comply with the same rights as a tenant who rents their own abode privately. This means making a framework for all tenants to be given a lease for their rented room. A decent door lock for each room as well. These things are in urgent need of being done.

Alayna de Graaf

07 Jul 2019

Bring back the SA Housing Trust how it used to be. This is something our taxes should be paying for - and all Australians should be able to register for a SA Housing Trust House and not have to wait for a decade to get one.
Leaving that important job to private suppliers is not showing responsibility - I have seen boarding houses that are poorly maintained, well below any public healthy standards, filthy kitchens, not disability friendly and charging $165 per room, for tiny rooms. Housing security shouldn't be about people making money off of those who need a home to live in. There is too much exploitation going on.

Lesley Flora > Alayna de Graaf

25 Jul 2019

Well, their policy changed years ago now, you only get a place if you have a mental disorder, are a so-called refugee or if you have come out of prison, they're not interested in hard working fair dinkim low income struggling workers anymore, look into the policy yourself, it was discussed at our local library with someone from Housing SA well over 5 years ago now

Liz Hearingwell

06 Jul 2019

As someone who has experienced various periods of homeless and at risk of, and been on a housing association wait list as a Catergory 1 for 7 years with not one offer of a house.. It suggests the current data base system is not effective.. I suggest that every Catergory 1 applicant needs to be paired with a caseworker, who is in contact with that participant regularly and who is actively advocating on their behalf... Currently the system is too passive and applicants are lost in the system for years, because Noone is keeping an eye out for them or advocating on their behalf.

John Piovesan > Liz Hearingwell

10 Jul 2019

Hi Liz, there also is not the supply to meet Catagory 1 demand. The most urgent cases, ie single parents with young kids get priority in order to provide safety and ensure these kids get a chance and don't grow up traumatized. There needs to be a massive policy overhaul to turn this around. I agree there needs to be more state responsibility. Allowing more to be done with existing community housing/SA Hosing land will help to some extent.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Liz Hearingwell

25 Jul 2019

Thanks for your input Liz.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Liz Hearingwell

25 Jul 2019

Thanks for your response Liz.