Home and community

What does your home and your community/neighbourhood mean to you?

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Donna Merrett

31 Aug 2019

I recently purchased a house off Housing SA through the Affordable Homes scheme. I am happy and very grateful as I won't ever be homeless. Since I have owned my own home I have been feeling a sense of pride. Life is good. I am living in a Housing SA street. What has struck me as unusual is that I am surrounded by single women living in three bedroom homes that occupy 425square meters of land. One moved in three years ago after selling her house, having been on a Housing SA wait list for 28 years and another moved in 7 years ago as her mother died and she was in her mothers Housing SA property. Another just moved in with one child, so there's one extra empty room in her place.

These women quite often have people staying with them that Housing SA aren't informed off. These women do it easy. They get $450 a week from the government, pay $100 in rent to Housing SA, yes that's right $100!!! to live in a three bedroom home, charging rent when they can, on a large block and have over $350 a week left to live on. I own my own home (a two bedroomer), pay a mortgage and get $281 a week to live on under Newstart... Well, Newstart is actually one reason why people are homeless.

I think Housing SA needs to look at housing women together or giving them less square meterage or rooms to live in. They do not need a large amount of space, just somewhere warm, dry and safe. That way the 3 bedroom properties can be utilised or reworked better. I believe the same should happen for single men, (they are in my street as well), particularly as the government are encouraging people to live at home for longer and not go into retirement living.

Surely there has to be a better housing solution, which is to offer single people one bedroom smaller spaces to live in. Some child is sleeping in a car tonight, while there are all of these rooms empty in my Housing SA street, it makes my blood boil. Build a transportable cabin park or do whatever you have to do but you need to stop your tenants wroughting the system Housing SA. Take control, and if your tenants don't like it they can go live outside, as someone in a tent would be most grateful for a simple roof over their head or basic accommodation such as a 'tiny home'.

Kathleen Smart

28 Aug 2019

Given that hundreds of homeless people live outdoors, I think the State government and councils should open and maintain public toilets 24/7. I myself have been caught short when riding home on the bike path and to my horror, discovered the public toilets are locked at 6pm. We are all human beings who need the facilities 24/7. They are not just for fortunate people who have homes to go to at night.

Andrea Gould

28 Aug 2019

Hi I have seen in some states they are doing tiny houses and putting them on the council land and putting homeless people in them. I think this is a great idea plus help with getting them back into housing in the long run.

Marilyn Galbraith

01 Aug 2019

You know what, it does not really matter what comments are made and voiced, nothing will change.
At 64, renting, no prospect of having permanent housing (wait list SA housing 15-20yrs). A son with severe mental problems,
(all be it a very intelligent human) has SA Housing residence but lives around drug dealers and has been severely bashed, hospitalized and stalked to sell drugs, and is still required to look for employment. THE SYSTEM IS TRULY BROKEN.
I have no faith or hope for MY future. Where will you put me SA Housing, when I can no longer work. I must keep my son in the so called "SYSTEM" as I will not be on this planet forever. I live in fear of how he will fend for himself with his issues. YET AGAIN, UNLESS I PAY PRIVATE, THERE IS NO GOVERNMENT HELP. I guess when you read the reports of all the cuts the Government is making to cover their normal pay rises, something has to give. MENTAL HEALTH. My son was rejected from a government facility as they are over their quota and are now deemed as ACUTE ONLY. There is NO COMMUNITY, NO VILLAGE. All live such private secluded lives, no person wants to know about the downs and outs of another. COMMUNITY DOES NOT EXIST, HAS NOT FOR A VERY LONG TIME. Life is so very desperate, we are mostly just surviving. HOW VERY VERY VERY BLOODY SAD

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Marilyn Galbraith

05 Aug 2019

Good morning Marilyn,
Thank you very much for your contribution and thoughtful comments.

Dino Gallina

01 Aug 2019

Alice Clark has stole my thunder! and good on her. What she has stated is essential and a "no-brainer". The fact all humans in SA should have the ability to have a roof over their heads. It's a sad sight seeing homelessness in SA, and for a state as wealthy as ours, no one seems to have a clue how to go about it. I look at housing in many facets. It's not just a roof over their heads, it's a healing process. Generally many homeless people are driven to their situations by various factors in their lives. Protection for these souls is a start. Then is the healing process. When their is a broken spirit or soul, there is no prosthetic to fix it immediately. Part of the healing is to support the homeless by giving them the support they require to transcend back into the community, give them self worth and the courage in time to go out to the world and feel appreciated and find employment.
Housing is the basis of the Australian way of life. It provides all the security a human requires, it gives them the strength and courage to wake up every morning and feel like a contributor to society, it allows them the opportunity to live what most of us call a "normal" life without scrutiny and prosper. Communities encourage each other to speak freely, discuss the world issues, make assessments and judgements and even though it may differ from person to person, the have the ability to voice their thoughts without prejudice. Housing is the corner stone of society, were family and friends can meet and enjoy each others company in a free and open way..

Marilyn Galbraith > Dino Gallina

01 Aug 2019

Good one Dino. Totally agree

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Dino Gallina

05 Aug 2019

Hi Dino,
thanks for your feedback on this important topic.

Alice Clark

26 Jul 2019

A home is more than physical shelter, it is where people feel safe and secure, store their belongings, look after themselves and their families and have a base upon which they can participate socially and economically. Home can be a place of refuge from the world. Having a home means that people can access education, employment and civil society. Meanings of home are subjective – they are different for different people. Home can be symbolised by bricks and mortar, being with friends and family or tied to a certain place. With the number of people experiencing homelessness on the rise, a South Australian housing strategy should not merely address the basic human right to shelter, but the right for all citizens to have a home, and every aspect of the housing system.

People feel a sense of belonging to their street, suburb or neighbourhood when they have friends and family around them. People who have resided in one location for longer periods are more likely to feel a sense of belonging to where they live than people who are newly arrived. Communities need not be bound by geography but may be made up of interest groups, sports clubs, on-line forums or peers and these relationships should not be confused with physical locations or neighbourhoods. Governments cannot make communities.

Government Agency

Housing Strategy > Alice Clark

26 Jul 2019

Thanks for your great comments Alice.

Marilyn Galbraith > Alice Clark

01 Aug 2019

Alice, you are switched on. Shame the government is NOT

Alice Clark > Alice Clark

02 Aug 2019

Hi Marilyn, it is good to see people participating in this process. There is a lot of consultation going on right now and we are optimistic that we will have a good strategy for housing in South Australia as an outcome, so we must press on!

Selina Simmons

13 Jul 2019

Therefore what was a lovely country town has now lost any “community feel” to it!

Selina Simmons

13 Jul 2019

I, after a great deal of problems with my old house, returned to my new home in the country to find unfriendly neighbours who have made my life hell! I have a right to live in peace and instead of being supported in my rights; council having approved my new home 3x boight into the ****! It has cost me a ridiculous amount of $ to finally be declared in the right! Still council takes no stand as they "aren't interested” and these people continue building rubbish on the fenceline that is from scrap rubbish! I will never be able to sell with that being seen from my windows; and they won’t desist! Wrong