Discussion Paper on the Mining Act 1971 and Regulations

*UPDATE: Grain producers now have until the end March to make submissions to the review of the Mining Act.

The State Government granted the extension due to the late finishing harvest. All other submissions to the review are due Friday 24 February.

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Discussion Paper on the Mining Act 1971 and Regulations (PDF 9.2 MB) has now been released for public consultation. This is the second in a series of three discussion papers to be released as part of the Leading Practice Mining Acts Review. The Mining Act 1971 is the central piece of legislation that regulates exploration, mining and quarrying in South Australia.  The Act has not been holistically reviewed since 1971.  Since that time, rapid technological advances have meant that the industry practices have become far more modern, safe, sustainable and efficient – and community expectations around mining and quarrying (such as expectations around open community engagement) have vastly changed.  The attached Discussion Paper initiates a discussion about the objectives and processes of the Mining Act and Regulations so that we can identify ways of updating and improving regulatory processes, without compromising on their effectiveness and efficiency. We welcome your views on these options.

Submissions on the paper are open until 24 February 2017. You can lodge your submissions via email DSD.miningactreview@sa.gov.au or by posting to: Department of State Development, Mineral Resources, GPO Box 320 Adelaide, 5001. 

In the interests of transparency, submissions may be published online as part of the Review process. Please advise if you wish for your submission to remain confidential

Comments closed

Can Yin

22 Feb 2017

Native Title issue seems to be the most time consuming problem for many exploration project. There are so many companies that have struggled or are struggling to solve this problem. The time could be saved if the cultural clearance could be done before any exploration lease should be given to a holder. Why don't the DSD (by cooperating with other relevant departments) start a statewide investigation about heritage /culture issue over ALL land that has the possibility of being explored/mined? This operation wouldn't use any resources other than the Native Title holders/claimants, who will benefit as a whole by clarifying their heritages. Democracy should be introduced into any debate if different claimants have different opinions over any myth that is not unanimously recognised by all.

Government Agency

yourSAy Engagement Team > Can Yin

06 Mar 2017

Hi Can. Thank you for your comments.

Adam Ainsworth

22 Feb 2017

Hi, We would like to lodge a series of comments towards the discussions but due to logistical issues we were only fully made aware of our ability to do so on the 21st February. Given the submissions on the paper are only open until the 24th February is there a place where we can request an extension to make submissions please. Adam Ainsworth

Government Agency

yourSAy Engagement Team > Adam Ainsworth

06 Mar 2017

Hi Adam. Apologies for the delay in responding to you. The Review Team would be happy to provide you an extension until 31 March 2017.

Government Agency

yourSAy Engagement Team

17 Feb 2017

Thank you for your comment Adrian.

Adrian Shackley

17 Feb 2017

Private mines continue to be a problem. There are quite a few on the Adelaide Plains and no doubt elsewhere that have been inactive for years that need to be de-listed. The ones that do operate need to be brought into a contemporary environmental regulation. Current ability to reduce a sand dune with significant native vegetation to a bare flat paddock is 19th century practice. Sand mining of old sand dunes seems too often to result in damage to remnant vegetation and poor restoration (where this is required).

Government Agency

yourSAy Engagement Team > Adrian Shackley

17 Feb 2017

Thank you for your comment Adrian.