How should natural resources be managed in South Australia?

Check out the Discussion Paper, the Executive Summary and the Frequently Asked Questions and have your say on how you believe natural resources should be managed to help us shape the new Landscape South Australia Bill.

Leave a comment

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team

17 Aug 2018

It's encouraging to see how much interest the proposed reforms have been generating over the last month. Thanks everyone for joining the conversation and providing your feedback.

Just a reminder that there are still spots available at the upcoming regional community forum sessions and some of the metropolitan sessions including Grange and Marion. If you are able to make it to a session please book your place as soon as you can and if further sessions can be arranged, they will be announced on this site. Don't forget that submissions are welcome via this discussion forum, email or letter. Thanks again everyone.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Julia Peacock

16 Aug 2018

The Nature Conservation Society of SA would like to provide the feedback that the planned number of community workshops in the Adelaide region is insufficient. We're encouraging our members and supporters to be engaged in this reform but it is difficult if sessions are booked out.

The geographic spread of the sessions also seems uneven, with western and south/south eastern locations only at present, so we would suggest additional sessions be scheduled for central Adelaide as well as northern and eastern locations. The timing of these sessions could be following the release of the separate discussion paper on "Green Adelaide" which is foreshadowed on page 17 of the Discussion Paper, so that community members can respond more specifically to the proposed priorities for that body, as well as to the reform proposal in general.

Yours sincerely,
Julia Peacock
Nature Advocate
The Nature Conservation Society of South Australia

Robyn Wood > Julia Peacock

16 Aug 2018

I agree, I have tried to register with the Mawson Lakes and Mt Barker sessions and they are both full. I am on the wait list but don't expect anything to come of it, I would expect people who have booked and then can't go to just not turn up and not bother to formally cancel.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Stephen Fuller

15 Aug 2018

I have an interest in sustainability and believe that our human presence on the earth can only be sustainable if we are educated about how to live sustainably. Education for Sustainability (or Education for Sustainable Development) is the developed method for educating our people in this respect. SA is something of a national leader in the support of EfS in the pre-tertiary education systems through the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative. The support provided by NRM Education and Kesab is vital to the continuation of this facet of education in SA.
To in any way degrade these services will compromise what is already an incomplete educational aspiration.
In my opinion, NRM Education must be expanded and the Dept of Education directed to realign its curriculum delivery so that all students are equipped to understand and be prepared to live sustainable lives at home work and play.
The succession of mistakes that humanity has made over the past 200 years must be corrected and key to this is equipping our young people to participate fully in the transition to a sustainable society and economy and the repair of past mistakes.
Without a knowledgeable and engaged population we are doomed to repeat past mistakes and be incapable of developing the innovative solutions required for our current problems.
If Nature Education as your reform paper calls it omits the full range of topics, processes of engagement and skills development through applied critical thinking that is involved in EfS then you will be selling our students short and will be repeating the mistakes of the past.
Our care for nature comes from within following the development of an emotional and intellectual appreciation of our place in nature and our dependency on its health.
Our people must be fully equipped to critique and reform our approach to resource consumption and our impact on our "Landscapes" so that we can wisely and sustainably manage our natural resources. To do otherwise is to condemn our children to live in a degraded dying Landscape.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Stephen Fuller

16 Aug 2018

Thanks for your comments Stephen. We have been receiving lots of valuable input in relation to NRM Education and will definitely be taking all of the feedback into consideration. Your interest in this matter is much appreciated

Robyn Wood > Stephen Fuller

16 Aug 2018

Totally agree Steve, I am concerned that the environment and education about the environment will be left in a worse state after this review

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Jenni McGlennon

15 Aug 2018

Can you tell us when the Green Adelaide Discussion Paper will be released? And will this be out for consultation?

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Jenni McGlennon

16 Aug 2018

Hi Jenni. Thanks for your interest in Green Adelaide. A Green Adelaide discussion paper and a series of FAQs are currently being developed and will be published here on YourSAy for consultation in the near future. In the meantime, if you can, we encourage you to attend one of the community forum sessions to further have your say.

Kym McKay > Jenni McGlennon

17 Aug 2018

yep no response from response team, establishes that your really not about wide and full consultation with all stakeholders, Reform Team probably all the same NRM spin Drs of past.

Kym McKay > Jenni McGlennon

17 Aug 2018

seems i posted in wrong box, should have been below in mine

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Kym McKay

15 Aug 2018

There needs to be another community session in the Western Council area one at Grange is to far removed from other Council areas that have the Torrens running through them, Given the millions of dollars pillaged out of those Council areas with the NRM Levy you are diluting the opportunity for wider feedback. Are you really seeking extensive feedback or just doing a snow job to tick the box "we consulted" ?

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Kym McKay

17 Aug 2018

Hi Kym, we are doing our best to hold as many forums across the state as we can given that there is such a wide range of people involved and interested in natural resources. All of your posts have been noted and if any additional sessions are able to be arranged then further advice will be provided on this site. We understand not everyone will be able to attend a local forum so we are also asking people to provide written feedback about the proposed reforms. Comments received through this online discussion forum will be taken into consideration and input is also welcomed through email or letter. Thank you for your interest.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Kym McKay

15 Aug 2018

Thank goodness this bureaucratic Greens Zealots Led Dept is being disbanded, The NRM boarded on a dictatorship, bullied land owners, its board meetings were a junket for attendance fees. The Board squandered NRM Levies on personal airy fairy whims. The River Torrens is a disgrace even though the Board trots out old chestnuts like "Oh we did breakout Creek" and Have Trash Racks, from the millions plundered in levies from the Councils along the Torrens hardly anything over the last 16 years has been done except in the Post Card Picture zone of the CBD. The NRM has been a major impediment to this States progress, I only hope this inst just a re branding of a dictatorship and hope it is purged from the Top Public Servants and its appointed cronies. Bring on the Changes ASAP

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Deb Downes

14 Aug 2018

To Everyone,
Given the comments about a “Tough Budget”, with the Department responsible for the Environment clearly singled out as having to “provide” a significant amount of savings, I think we can say goodbye to responsible management of National Parks and Resources in this state, for the foreseeable future.

To not adequately consider Climate Change is ridiculous.

What we have is a bunch of “Motherhood Statements” designed to take us back into ancient history as far as natural resource management is concerned.

Very disappointing. But, even worse, given the said Climate Change, it will be extremely difficult to salvage anything once these idiots have moved on. I feel very sad for our younger generations.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Patricia Rogers

11 Aug 2018

To the reform team,
I am extremely concerned regarding the plan to open our valuable reservoirs to the public for recreational water activities. The Reservoirs that provides Adelaide with it’s drinking water.
What will be the impact upon the water levels in our reservoirs which are at present still below 50% and the enormous cost if accidental or deliberate contamination occurs.
It is extremely simplistic to declare that water may be extracted from the Murray River to “top up” the reservoirs. That will lead to lower environmental flows.
Our wonderful beaches are the places where we can enjoy many varied and pleasurable water activities, not our valuable reservoirs that provides the state with it’s drinking water.
The impact upon our Australian fauna and flora in the reserves surrounding the reservoirs ie Happy Valley Reservoir Reserve, which is at present protected from the public, is to easily dismissed.
Society has had a very detrimental impact upon our Australian fauna and flora and we don’t have to totally extinguish their habitat in these very unique safe areas, just to provide “ a domain for pleasurable activities “ .
Patricia Rogers.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Patricia Rogers

13 Aug 2018

Hi Patricia and thanks for your comments. The issue of opening the reservoirs actually falls under another government election commitment which is the creation of Glenthorne National Park. Your feedback has been forwarded to the team that is working on this commitment. Feel free to head to https://www.environment.sa.gov.au/topics/reservoirs where you can further have your say on this matter. Your input is valuable and will help to inform the way our reservoirs will be opened and managed in to the future. Thanks again, we appreciate the time you have taken to share your concerns.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Betty Sue Smith

10 Aug 2018

Mr David Speirs
Minister for Environment and Water
GPO Box 1047
Adelaide, SA 5001

I have read the Executive Summary, the Discussion Paper and the Frequently Asked Questions. Thank you for the opportunity to make comments.

I am a biologist with 4 decades of experience in ecology and working with landholders. I have with a long-term interest in biodiversity and land management of the State.

Rebadge and reform the program if you must but please do not drag us back to the 1950s.

Back to Basics? Really? Sounds similar to a Local Council’s return to the 3Rs – roads, rates, and rubbish, with the new environmental equivalents of these 3Rs under the moniker of Landscapes SA being: soil quality, water management, weeds and pest animal control, and tree planting.

The basics listed are not enough anymore in the 21st Century. Here are a few looming issues with no, or just a passing, mention:
• Climate Change
• Climate Change
• Climate Change
• Drought proofing farm practices; taking drought as the norm, not the exception
• Land-based biodiversity and / or its management.
• The marine environment and its biodiversity.
• Reduced resilience to change in the natural systems
• Reduced resistance to change in our natural systems
• The fundamental issue of overabundant native animals
• Tree planting is not a substitute for ‘vibrant biodiversity’.
• The funding and expertise gap between current management of ecosystems and the passing mention of Rewilding.

Much of the documentation is about process (some might say busy work), not outcomes. Here are some process issues with which you will need to deal:
• Better boundaries for regions which encompass similar rainfalls, landscapes, agricultural industries, and issues.
• Loss of professional expertise and essential programs by recent defunding
• Gutting of the Environment portfolio
• The burnout of communities from previous iterations of like proposals
• The disillusionment of communities seeing busy-ness rather than progress in this proposal

I reserve the right to expand of the dot points above with specifics at a later date.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

David Leach

09 Aug 2018

The info session in Mt Barker is booked out, are you going to move to a larger venue or run another session in Mount Barker???

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > David Leach

09 Aug 2018

Hi David, thanks for your message. Numbers for each forum are restricted to enable robust conversations as part of a structured facilitated session. Apologies that your preferred forum is full. However, you may like to consider signing up to the waitlist so that you can be contacted if any spots become available, alternatively if you can travel to Murray Bridge, Marion or Grange perhaps you can consider registering for one of these sessions. Please don't hesitate to email us at landscapereform@sa.gov.au if you have any further queries about the sessions.

Lee Williams > David Leach

09 Aug 2018

Reform Team, if community engagement is requested, and forums are a part of that, it seems disappointing that people may be discouraged, and asked to go to another area. Locals are the best to identify local issues, as this reform is seen as necessary, and travelling may not be an option for participants. can I ask what numbers are restricted to in each venue. this number of responses is surely a positive, as many times communities are less engaging,

David Leach > David Leach

09 Aug 2018

I have facilitated many community discussions and agree with others that directing me to another session 30kms away is less than optimal.
We pay a couple of hundred dollars a year in NRM levies, for many years, are you all that busy that you can not run a second session in areas where there are interested.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > David Leach

09 Aug 2018

It is definitely encouraging to see that there is a lot of interest in the proposed reforms and the community forums. We are doing our best to hold as many forums as we can across the state given the wide range of people involved in natural resources. While not everyone will be able to attend a community forum due to the scheduled times, or due to some of them reaching capacity (60 people per session) the forums are only one of the ways we are seeking feedback about the reforms. We welcome everyone’s input through this online discussion or through an email or letter. We have taken note of your concerns though and if additional sessions can be arranged then further advice will be posted on this site.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Sue Oldfield

08 Aug 2018

I am not sure if this is the correct place to go with this having previously sent an email to NRM with a phone call response which I appreciate but feel the issue needs to be addressed some other way.
I can only speak for the township of Pt Vincent & Stansbury but ask how & who can change a protected species to non protected. The people do not understand why the Cormorant (Shag) is classed as a protected species when there are such large numbers in these 2 towns & have been for many years, I understand there has not been a count of numbers also for many years!
These 2 towns alone are being bombarded of a night time with Cormorant excrement. The stench is appalling & unhygienic.
They sit on the oyster bed posts where the excrement has made the water that bad that oysters cannot be farmed for some days. In Stansbury they roost in the trees where market days are held so then other resources are wasted as the CFS sometimes has to come in & hose the pavement off. The pontoons where people swim are covered in it. Cars get bombarded & if its not washed off quickly, effects the paint. The local Hotel windows, decking & roof get splattered with it. God forbid if they wanted to use rainwater of have solar panels. It would be a waste of money. The stench is off putting for customers especially summertime when windows are open. The Norfolk Pine trees are dying at the top.
Currently a permit is issued for local Progress to shoot which is aimed at scaring them away, with a small number able to be shot. Whilst some don't agree with the shooting, such a small number have no impact & the scaring is only short lived. The cost of bullets having to be purchased is not ideal.
With such large numbers the amount of fish consumed is surely having an impact on fish stocks, its not just the fishermen depleting them!
Surely they should not be protected species & there should be another way to bring them back to an acceptable level!

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Sue Oldfield

16 Aug 2018

Hi Sue thanks for raising this issue. One of our teams is looking into this matter further. We'll get back to you very shortly.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Paul Gibbs

07 Aug 2018

To Whom It May Concern.

I would like to have my say in relation to the changes being proposed to the Natural Resources Management Act.

Whilst it is clearly reasonable to review and modify any existing government outlay it is also important to base any action on the real evidence on what has and will be managed. We need to base our decisions on the objective truth of the environmental reality that is presented to us.

Equally important, is an assessment of those in our communities who actually have the qualifications, expertise and experience to advise these decisions. It is acknowledged in the rationale for changing the NRM Act that good work has been done and that some have a perception of being too close to government.
By its very nature any organisation that is funded by government will have to work closely with government to be accountable for the limited funds it is charged to distribute.

I understand there is evidence presented by the University of Adelaide School of Biological Sciences/Ecological and Environmental Science that has made it clear that the loss of native plant habitat has been the single most destructive process to the long term sustainability of ecology and biological diversity of the wider Adelaide Hills catchment.

It is this that underpins the management of the preservation of our environmental inheritance.

The acceptance of this principle would then enable the progressive rehabilitation of our environment over the next fifty to one hundred years, which potentially would lead to the effective control of pest plants and animals as well as providing a basis for planning and implementing sustainable agriculture and major water management priorities.

The outstanding work of Professor David Paton AM and his Adelaide University team needs to be one of the authentic experts we call on in developing the Landscape South Australia Act . There are also many other qualified people who have a clear grasp of the situation and they need to be invited to present evidence that will inform government process and policy. Some of these people are currently engaged with the NRM and in addition to having qualifications, have significant experience in private enterprise and influencing local communities. Let’s not lose this expertise.

Whatever final decision is made by our government let it recognise what is really happening to our natural resources. To have a situation where, in 2018, the Adelaide Hills has less than 7% of its original flora and falling numbers of bird and mammals species is an indictment on ourselves as an informed society, and the new Act must recognise and address this.

Sincerely
Paul Gibbs
Dip T; B Ed

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team

07 Aug 2018

Due to high demand, those wanting to hear more about the government's proposed reforms to our natural resource management system can now register to attend two new Community Forums:

• Marion – 30 August (6-9pm) – Marion Cultural Centre
• Grange – 6 September (6-9pm) – Grange Golf Club

You can register on this site through the Community Forums and Workshops page (select Metropolitan Adelaide Community Forums). Please note that numbers for each forum are restricted to enable robust conversations as part of a structured facilitated session. If your preferred forum is full, please register your interest by signing up to the waitlist. We will seek to organise additional sessions as demand allows.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Lee Williams

06 Aug 2018

How should natural resources be managed in South Australia? Perhaps realistically, from many of the previous comments. Education is a focus, and it is a big part of consideration when making plans and implementing them. Goal setting of desired outcomes, and reaching those targets needs commitment. not just a financial commitment. The "natural" landscape is changing, and as a landholder of a farming property, would like to be able to hand over a farm, and a property that is full of native animals and vegetation, and agricultural practices that compliments the land, water and soil in our care. the regions in the state are all unique in their own way, and differ as much as the adjoining landholders in any region, with individual and contrasting views and ideas of land management, and natural resource management. The natural resource management in South Australia needs to compliment and work with border states as well. Not much point having rules and regulations that cannot meet desired outcomes, or meet the intended/desired outcome because of an imaginery boundary/border on a map. This is evident with feral deer in SA, and the different view of unconfined deer in Victoria. A pest vs a game resource. The impact of other commitments with interstate things like the MDB, having drains in the SE of South Australia funded for millions of $$, moving water around through many landholdings, with unknown longterm and potentially irreversible impact on soils, water, and biodiversity outcomes. The drains, implementation and ongoing effects may or may not secure desired outcomes for natural resources of South Australia. I look forward to the managing our landscapes event in our local area in September, and hope that when the reform is realised, landholders are encouraged and supported as they manage their properties into the future.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Lee Williams

08 Aug 2018

Thanks for your useful feedback Lee which will be taken into account. It’s good to hear you have booked in to attend a community forum session next month to further share your views. We look forward to seeing you there.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Barbara Randell

06 Aug 2018

I am a botanist with a long-term interest in the vegetation of South Australia, both within Adelaide and throughout arid areas. I have also been an active member of Friends of Parks for 25 years.

Over the years I have become very cynical about the efforts of governments to manage environments. Usually they are elected for 3-year terms, and hope to 'fix' problems within that time scale, and impress electors with their great results. Those of us in the field are well aware that the problems will barely be impacted by new approaches within any 3-year period.

That being said, I have read through the discussion paper. Like Peter Croft, I am dumbfounded to find that there is NO consideration being given to the major problem we are currently facing ie. Climate change. For there is no doubt that our climate is changing, whether or not we believe that human activity is contributing to that change. Climates have changed many times within geological eras, why should our time be any different? Surely one of the highest priorities of any new legislation dealing with the environment should be to assist soils, vegetation, water, primary producers, managers etc etc etc to be sustainable through the climate changes we are already encountering.

Another omission would appear to be any consideration of air quality. Maybe that will be left to Greening Adelaide to manage. But it's effect is not restricted to Adelaide alone.

Also I see nothing about marine ecosystems. There are many parts of the state where management of this environment is a major concern.

One final note, at a practical level. I see that the Grassroots Grants will be managed co-operatively between the landscape boards. I am sure that virtually every Board could find grant applications that would take up all the $2million dollars available. There will need to be an independent decision maker to make sure that the Boards don't have major disagreements about which applications get funded.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Jo Gebhardt

03 Aug 2018

As part of the reform process I would like the current Operation staff sharing agreement between the Northern and Yorke NRM and Murray Darling Basin NRM boards for the Rangelands Group area reassessed. It is regarded by staff and group members as complex and difficult to work under. The Rangelands area should operate under one board, the MDB.
I also think the merger of DEWNR and NRM has not been a successful initiative. NRM is now perceived in the community as yet another government department which places it at arms length from the people it needs to be relating to.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Cheryl Zampin

03 Aug 2018

Landscape reform is a very important topic not only for the people but for the native fauna which reside in these areas. In QLD, landclearing is having a devastating impact on the wildlife with many species under threat of extinction.

In SA we are already encroaching on our wildlife however community education is wavering. Most are unaware species like koalas etc do live in suburbia like Elizabeth, Salisbury, Henley Beach, Flagstaff Hill etc.

The trees which they live in form part of the delicate ecosystem we have in SA. The trees needs these native animals, the water needs the trees, the trees need the soil and water. We are already seeing native animals die because the balance is being affected and we need to act NOW to change this.
If just one of these systems comes under threat, the whole ecosystem is affected.

We desperately need to focus on soil, our native flora and fauna and waterways to ensure they are healthy again or we will lose our lovely ecosystem.

To put it into perspective.....imagine Australia’s iconic koala being extinct. Doesn’t sit well does it!
It’s all connected...water, flora and fauna. We MUST do something and FAST.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Kate Washington

03 Aug 2018

Kate Washington
Kitchen Garden and Environmental Educator

The current hands-on services and resources provided by the NRM Education Program is of high quality and incredibly effective at promoting environmental and sustainability education to primary schools. I am concerned that with the proposed changes and focus of Green Adelaide, we will lose this invaluable and unique resource.

I work across two different primary schools in the outer Adelaide area, and as a result have engaged with a number of different officers from the NRM Education program. I find all the individuals to have extensive expertise and experience in managing strong and impactful projects at this crucial level of our children's development. Their unceasing support is delivered through onsite visits, working directly with students and assisting teachers and SSOs to deliver high quality programming that has lasting educational and environmental benefits to our youngest generation.

The fact that schools are not even mentioned in your discussion paper or executive summary was a very strong indicator that this unique service has not been considered extensively enough. This is a landmark service that South Australia should be recognised for and strengthening, rather than throwing the baby out with the bathwater in an attempt to re-badge it as 'nature education' and forcing a re-creation of something that already works incredibly well.

I am concerned that in this restructure, us educators and our students will lose our lifeline to this incredibly important resource and it will take many years to even come close to replacing it, let alone improve on. Please do not underestimate its value and disregard the good work of this Program in the changes to come.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment and I will watch the development of this new legislation and affiliated changes closely.
Kind regards
Kate Washington

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team

03 Aug 2018

Thanks everyone for your contributions so far and for getting involved in this discussion - there is some great feedback being provided. Next week marks the start of our community forums. Don't forget to register if you haven't already. The forums are another great way for everyone to have their say on the proposed reforms.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Melissa Priest

03 Aug 2018

Melissa Priest
Youth and Recreation Officer
City of Holdfast Bay

We currently have a great working partnership between NRM Education and the Cities of Marion, West Torrens and Holdfast Bay, to deliver three school garden professional development workshops across our three Council areas annually. This has been a really successful partnership for a number of reasons, including:
• Enabling the opportunity to offer free PD to teachers by utilising the expertise of NRM Ed staff and contacts, and within a very modest support budget provided by the three Councils.
• Showcasing what schools and early learning centres are achieving around our regions whether it is big or small scale projects and give educators the opportunity to make connections to provide each other with information on learning and successes and to support each other.
• Providing an avenue to promote opportunities available to schools and earning centre centres through each of our three Councils.
• Providing an avenue to promote opportunities available for schools through NRM Ed staff and resources.
We would really like to be able to continue with this great partnership into the future.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Peter Croft

03 Aug 2018

As with kate's comments below, I could not get the email address to work

Peter Croft

Government Agency

YourSAy Administrator > Peter Croft

03 Aug 2018

Thanks for letting us know Peter, we've reconfigured the email links so we hope that has resolved the issue you experienced. Cheers

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Peter Croft

03 Aug 2018

Mr David Speirs
Minister for Environment and Water
GPO Box 1047
Adelaide
SA 5001

I am responding to your invitation to comment on the Discussion paper “Managing our Landscapes: Conversations for Change”. Thank you for the invitation to do so.

I was surprised that the document did not start with the key issue for any land manager right now: the impact of climate change on landscapes in the future. The recent severe weather in the northern hemisphere (Sweden forest fires, Greece fires, Japan heatwaves and typhoons to name a few) has highlighted the changes taking place right now. We can reasonably expect that South Australia will experience more severe weather (bushfires, drought conditions and storms) to an increasing extent from now on across its landscapes. This coming summer is likely to be a testing time for South Australia. The future will be much more so.

With this in mind, I found the document read as a paper mainly concerned with process not outcome. As an example: the page (page 11) entitled “Benefits“ outlines 12 benefits of the proposed changes and highlights process benefits (e.g. governance, agility, administration costs, system changes etc). While “Vibrant biodiversity” was mentioned on page 8 of the document, the document has scarcely any mention of biodiversity in the description of the proposed changes in the pages that follow. The need for well-funded monitoring of landscapes to check how they are responding to climate change does not rate a mention either.

My overall impression of the document is that it reads as a return to the system of pest control, soil conservation and water boards which existed in the 1990s and previously, albeit on a lower funding base.

I urge you to rethink the changes that you are making. In particular, I suggest that you:

• start from climate change adaptation as the key future driver of change to landscapes
• ensure that the arrangements for NRM functions reflect what is required to adapt to climate change with some success. That includes adequate monitoring and adaptation to climate change.
• upgrade the role of biodiversity management in your planning: it’s not just managing the pest plants and animals to achieve viable landscapes; it’s important that the ecosystems in the landscapes work.
• ensure that these functions are resourced appropriately. No one will thank the government in ten years time for chopping a few million dollars each year off the cost of NRM and Environment Departments only to find that the South Australian landscapes are not adapting to climate change and that farming businesses aren’t viable and the natural parts of our landscapes are declining.

I am happy to discuss these suggestions in more detail at your convenience.

Yours sincerely

Peter Croft

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Kate Hubmayer

02 Aug 2018

Btw your email address to use for emailed comments does not work.

Government Agency

YourSAy Administrator > Kate Hubmayer

02 Aug 2018

Hi Kate - thanks for letting us know, we'll check the links. Do you recall which page it was that you tried? Cheers.

Kate Hubmayer > Kate Hubmayer

02 Aug 2018

The main page under contact details. "The following message to was undeliverable.
The reason for the problem:
5.1.0 - Unknown address error 550"

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Kate Hubmayer

02 Aug 2018

The services that NRM Education has offered to schools and community groups over the past decade has been excellent.
I have been involved with a number of school gardens, community gardens, community centres and native revegetation projects, and the support given by NRM Education has been broad and useful. This support has included hands-on help building a frog pond, excellent teaching resources, professional development and networking opportunities, small grants, a great website, weekly email newsletters and more. NRM Education has been the only government department which has offered such meaningful and useful support. Hugh Kneebone and his team have been fabulous. I hope their work will be able to continue under the new structure.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.

Allan Sumner sumner

01 Aug 2018

Natural resources should be managed in South Australia in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples of interest. We need to decolonize the oppressive systems that continue the process of colonization in South Australia and to restructure the system to be more inclusive of Aboriginal people. 50,000 years of traditional knowledge and practices yet today, Aboriginal voices and participation are not being valued.

The "Managing our Landscapes Conversations for Change" publication talks of South Australian's as being blessed with diverse, productive and stunning resources. I don't see any Aboriginal people being blessed nor enjoying these resources. Most Aboriginal people have not experienced the privileges associated with economic viability nor have they had an opportunity in managing their own land. Once upon a time, Aboriginal people had complete control over their lands and waters. 50,000 years of traditional knowledge, but unfortunately, promises in forging strong, enduring and productive partnerships with Aboriginal nations are often seen as token gestures and the commitments to maintain these relationships often fade away due to inadequate funding allocations. It's great to support landowners, growers, and pastoralists but what support is given to Aboriginal people whose lands and waters were taken away. Where is their economic base and how can Aboriginal people move forward autonomously in managing their own affairs equally if they don't have the infrastructure to work from?

My recommendations for Minister Spears

1. To provide adequate resources to assist in the establishment of an Aboriginal Natural Resource Center in South Australia.
1. 1 Build an Aboriginal Natural Resource Center that has the autonomy to speak on behalf of natural resources in South Australia, providing direction, offering projects and educational programs to Schools, Stakeholders, Land Owners, Growers, and Pastoralists.

2. Provide adequate resources to support the establishment of an Aboriginal Natural Resource Center to that will foster collaborative and close relationships directly with NRM boards/staff, Schools, Stakeholders, Land Owners, Growers, and Pastoralists.

My questions for Minister Spears

1. Will the minister offer a strategy in ensuring long-term employment for Aboriginal People in Natural Resources South Australia?

2. Will the minister consider the above recommendations in relation to NRM?

Thank you
Allan Sumner
Ngarrindjeri Kaurna Yankunytjatjara Representative
South Australia

Government Agency

Landscape Reform Team > Allan Sumner sumner

03 Aug 2018

Thanks for your insightful feedback Allan, which will be used to help shape the reforms. Your comments and suggestions will most definitely be given further consideration. Thanks again for joining the conversation.

Log in to reply

Log in now to comment

Don't have an account? Register here.