What are the best approaches government could take to address the issue of single-use plastics?

Hello and welcome to the discussion forum on single-use plastic products.

Read the Turning the tide on single-use plastic products Discussion Paper or the Summary Paper.

What are the best approaches government could take to address the issue of single-use plastics (eg. legislation, education, incentives).

Provide your feedback in the discussion below.

Comments closed

Enca Crosbie

22 Feb 2019

It is also important to include single-use coffee pods/ capsules within the scope of this review for better recycling management and public education.

According to Solo, coffee pods are usually made from a combination of plastics and aluminium with organic matter contained inside. It can take 150 to 500 years for these pods to break down in landfill, which is not good news for those wishing to reduce their carbon footprint on the planet. Reference: https://www.solo.com.au/latest-news/the-truth-about-coffee-pods/

I understand that there are limited recycling programs for aluminum coffee pods but not for plastic coffee pods that just go to landfill.

For example, retail outlets such as Aldi sell plastic coffee pods. When I approached Aldi (Golden Grove) about recycling their coffee pods, their response was "many people have been asking that but we don't have a recycle program". I think retailers need to put in place better sustainability programs for their products.

According to another article, it's said Australians are consuming about three million pods a day. More than 1.5 million households in Australia own a pod machine, a number forecast to double by 2018 with reports the capsule coffee market is on track to overtake the grocery bean market. Reference: https://m.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/problem-brews-with-3-million-pods-a-day/2708621/

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Green Industries SA > Enca Crosbie

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your thoughts and feedback, Enca, and identifying plastic coffee pods as an issue.

Ian Grosser

22 Feb 2019

Congratulations to the state government on furthering this conversation and believe that improving practices in relation to plastic products consumption and recycling should be prioritised.
I support both legislative changes and increased public education to improve recycling and reduce consumption of plastic products, especially single use plastics. Education is necessary to both increase the willingness to reduce consumption of products which are wasteful of resources and damaging to the environment, and to inform the community on how to recycle without contaminating recycling streams.
Banning of light weight single use plastic bags and other products which are problematic like disposable coffee cups and transforming to using more compostable products is also advantageous.
By building on our existing leadership in this area we can develop further expertise and branding with economic development potential and mitigate damage to the environment.

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Green Industries SA > Ian Grosser

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your support and feedback Ian. Yes, in addition to the environmental benefits, there could be economic advantages to leading on an issue that is currently on the policy agenda in many parts of the world.

Jane Paterson

22 Feb 2019

I have been closely following this issue of the proposed banning of some single-use plastics and the expansion of the container deposit scheme and have been heartened by the over whelming support and interest. The best solution of course is to ban single-use plastics and then focus on education. Changes need to be supported by educating the Public and Businesses. We all need to first think of our consumption I like to think of the three R's 1. Reduce/Avoid first 2. Re-use as much as possible and 3. Re-cycle correctly. Compostables are a good alternative but not if we are not educated and taught to dispose of them correctly. Compostables need to be clearly labelled and disposed in the correct bins - there needs to be more access to "Green" bins. There also needs to be more access to soft plastic re-cycling bins and re-cycling bins in Public spaces. I really hope that South Australia can lead the way and by doing so inspire other states and countries to follow our lead.

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Green Industries SA > Jane Paterson

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your thoughts, Jane. Recycling systems in public places, including systems that help people differentiate and properly manage both soft plastics and compostables need careful design and appropriate information, signage and education to work effectively and avoid contamination. Making systems accessible and convenient is critical in ensuring they are used properly.

Michelle Etheridge

22 Feb 2019

I began recycling soft plastic about 18 months ago at supermarkets and since then have drastically reduced my waste to landfill to a small bread-sized bag about once every cpuple of months. However many people are put off recycling things that cannot go in kerbside recycle bins. It takes an extra effort to save up things to drop off at various places, ie plastic wrapping from food, produce bag, electronic waste etc. I believe we need to invest in better technology and/or man hours at recycling centres to sort through a range of recyclable waste. If people did not have to make special trips to the supermarket or e-waste drop off points, a lot more would be recycled. I also think more needs to be done to reduce packaging in the first place. Perhaps some kind of incentive to companies which cut back on plastic packaging? Councils should not be giving out plastic bags for people to collect dog poo. They should be biodegradable.

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Green Industries SA > Michelle Etheridge

22 Feb 2019

Thanks Michelle. Congrats on your efforts at managing your soft plastics and getting that waste to landfill component to such a small size. People are used to kerbside systems, and they are much more convenient, but of course the nature of soft plastics is that they can easily tangle sorting machinery and cause costly breakdowns, so they need to be kept completely separated. Any approach to collect soft plastics at kerbside needs to be carefully designed. Compostable doggie bags could be considered, assuming that they are properly stored in public places to avoid exposure to the elements. The economics of compostable bags may become more favourable if demand for them increases.

Ben Ryan

21 Feb 2019

I believe that the plastic bag ban on lightweight plastics should be extended to the thicker plastic bags sold for 15 cents at supermarkets and some other stores. I believe this because there is a trend of many people not reusing them and ending up throwing them away. However if supermarkets only sold reusable cloth bags it would help to solve the problem as many people would be in the habit of reusing them as they cost a bit more money and are durable. I also believe that all fruit and veg bags in supermarkets should be compostable bags which have been certified and tested to decompose with compost.

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Green Industries SA > Ben Ryan

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments Ben. We agree it’s critical to get the terminology and criteria around what is compostable correct. Check out the Appendix in the discussion paper for definitions: http://tinyurl.com/singleuseplasticsdiscussion

Mark Parnell

21 Feb 2019

I have been heartened by the depth of feeling for the environment and the quality of comments on this web page since this process started. Whilst the issues aren't new, they have been given a huge boost by recent international moves to ban single-use plastics and also by the ABC's War on Waste television series. The idea that the amount of plastic in our oceans could overtake the amount of fish by 2050 is a horrifying thought. I will email in a more detailed submission, but I think a good starting point would be for the government to get behind my "Single Use and Other Plastics (Waste Avoidance) Bill 2018 which I tabled in Parliament last July. I based this Bill on recent European Union initiatives and also the recent Senate report on waste. My Bill (available on the Government's SA Legislation web site) covers the same products identified in the government's discussion paper. There is room for amendment though. The Senate proposed a 5 year phase-out, which is probably too long, so I'd be happy if the Government wanted to amend my Bill to make it happen faster. This issue should attract multi-party consensus. Mark Parnell MLC, Greens SA, Parliament House, Adelaide.

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Green Industries SA > Mark Parnell

22 Feb 2019

Thanks Mark for your attention to and interest in this engagement, and for your early efforts in pushing this issue as a policy concern.

Ann Phelps

20 Feb 2019

Our shopping bags for which we pay 15cents are bio degradable which is still harmful & only break down to micro plastic which is no different. Why can’t they not be made from bio compostable product which will completely break down. Let’s payfor something that is really helping the environment. Kmart is on board with brown paper bags come on supermarkets get on board

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Green Industries SA > Ann Phelps

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for the feedback Ann – we agree it’s critical to get the terminology and criteria about what is compostable correct. Check out the Appendix in the discussion paper for definitions: http://tinyurl.com/singleuseplasticsdiscussion

Fred Leaney

20 Feb 2019

Like many South Australians, our family has tried to minimise our use of single use plastic bags. Recently I finally realised that our use of biodegradable dog poo bags used when picking up the droppings from our dogs while on walks swamped all our other uses put together. We now purchase compostable bags from our local council and use one bag for each walk collecting several dog craps each time. The compostable bag goes in the green waste bin. We have been informed that the treatment of green waste for our council and many others means this is not a health hazard. Changing the ways of a community requires education and commitment from everyone. One step at a time. Replacing biodegradable dog poo bags with compostable bags is an easy first step... and really not that inconvenient.

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Green Industries SA > Fred Leaney

22 Feb 2019

Thanks Fred, and well done on identifying a simple way to address this issue. For now, the price difference between compostable and regular bags may be a barrier for some, but the economics may change to help more people make that choice, as demand for compostable bags increases.

Chelsea McLean

20 Feb 2019

Shops need a compelling reason to replace plastic produce bags with compostable and to stop selling fruits and vegetables packaged in plastic... banning plastic would make this positive change happen... we can't wait for all retailers to volunteer.

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Green Industries SA > Chelsea McLean

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for the feedback Chelsea. While some single use plastics are targeted by this initiative, at the moment, packaging efforts are auspiced by a national industry-led body, the Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation (APCO) www.packagingcovenant.org.au. Plastic packaging in supermarkets is clearly an issue of major concern to respondents.

Sally Geschmay

20 Feb 2019

stop using plastics... they're going to run out eventually anyway when the rest of the fossil stuff goes. Invest in sustainable renewables and recycling plants - employment outcomes. Get some design boffins involved. Get kids involved. Build something funky get the hipsters involved. Looked to the Nords - not only good drama but great ideas (well except for IKEA and may that fish that they wee on). Educate the community. Offer incentives where possible. Invest in and promote sustainable reusable cable ties - insidious things - so easy to use so destructive to environment. I won't be here but it would be nice to think we could keep the planet blue for a bit longer not choking on it's own bottom wind.

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Green Industries SA > Sally Geschmay

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments Sally, and yes plastics are derived from a non-renewable resource, so we will have to make the change at some point anyway. Design is critical – of recycling systems, of how we shop, and of the materials themselves.

Lisa Whitehead

20 Feb 2019

I really hope SA, once again, can lead the way in a sustainable future for Australia. I am looking forward to hearing positive news about the outcome of this discussion.

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Green Industries SA > Lisa Whitehead

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your interest and support, Lisa.

Bec Francis

19 Feb 2019

Supermarkets should provide / sell biodegradable / plant based plastic bags at the check out. Or reintroduce the use of a free box service to repurpose boxes.
Single use plastic bags that supermarkets can now profit on should absolutely be banned!
In addition, plastic pre-wrapped fruit and vegetables should be banned.

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Green Industries SA > Bec Francis

22 Feb 2019

Thanks Bec. It’s important to understand the difference between ‘biodegradable’ and ‘compostable’ - check out the Appendix in the discussion paper for definitions: http://tinyurl.com/singleuseplasticsdiscussion While some single use plastics are targeted by this initiative, at the moment, packaging efforts are auspiced by a national industry-led body, the Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation (APCO) www.packagingcovenant.org.au. Plastic packaging in supermarkets is clearly an issue of major concern to respondents.

Tiffany Sharp

19 Feb 2019

1. I do consider single use plastics to be harming the environment and becoming part of the food chain having a wide impact on individual and public health.
2. Living on the beach in the City of Holdfast Bay I see single use plastics in the water, on the sea bed, in the rocks, around wildlife, on the beach, in the sand dunes, along with huge numbers of cigarette butts and fishing line. I've seen marine life and birds trying to eat plastics from the ocean and on the shoreline, I've seen dead marine birds from undetermined death (possibly plastics) and from fishing wire.
3. With all change comes fear and the laggards, the community will adjust to single use plastic bans especially if you promote the impact on health and cause and effect (regularly) Target leaders in community such as sporting clubs to champion the way. All surf clubs on the beach should be a part of protecting the ocean and sea communities, their policies need to reflect leadership in this area.
4. Yes, all checkout bags and produce bags (i.e.for grocery items) be made from compostable (Australian Standard 4736-2006) material
5. Biodegradable,degradable or compostable bags would be used multiple times for multiple purposes if readily available, from shopping, to wrapping foods to picking up dog poo, simply a part of daily life.
6. Cotton buds, bread bags with plastic ring, plastic cutlery utensils, plastic bottles
The rest of the dot points- re labeling I think a key incentive behind recycling in SA (in the past) has been the money they will receive from recycling, as such increase the % and make it very bold in labeling. The 'feel good' collective wellness and environmental warriors will also make an impact as it becomes the 'trendy' thing to do (hopefully), until then money talks. Make the deposit plastic vending machines available along the beaches to encourage sporting clubs and those that frequent the areas to recycle, the vending machine will give them an immediate pavlonian kick with a monetary incentive. Have them available not far from cafe's, restaurants and supermarkets, where plastics are consumed.
Can we petition to have a plastic deposit vending machine locally? I've made inquiries to the council, however they do not know when they are to be installed nor where. Do you have information that could assist in successfully bidding for a recycling vending machine? Thank you

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Green Industries SA > Tiffany Sharp

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your observations and suggestions Tiffany. Deposit vending machines for soft plastics is an interesting idea, although the issue of soft plastics ‘away from home’ requires careful design of a whole system, including collection of the material.

Christopher Sellwood

19 Feb 2019

Bring back the lightweight bags. They're cheaper and more compact going into landfill. What am I going to have to do every time I forget to bring my bags to the shops, buy more cotton ones? Great solution, let's use all our water to grow more cotton!

Chris Rossi > Christopher Sellwood

19 Feb 2019

Seriously?? Those light weight bags kill so many turtles, marine life and native wildlife. If you can't remember a reusable bag to go shopping how could you possibly remember what you need to buy. It is not ok to put our laziness and ahead of native animals lifes and also destroy our environment in the process. There are plenty of reusable bags already in this country, many are made out of recycled plastic and will last a lifetime so your statement on growing cotton isn't very valid. I highly recommend watching some documentaries like 'A Plastic Ocean' or ABC's 'War on Waste'.

Christopher Sellwood > Christopher Sellwood

19 Feb 2019

Put the fcking bag in the bin instead of the ocean then.

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Green Industries SA > Christopher Sellwood

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments Christopher and Chris – single use plastics are a concern because they have serious impacts on wildlife, and also because of consumption of a non-renewable resource. It’s not always easy to create new habits, and remember bags, however single use items represent an ongoing flow of resources and embodied energy and water that reusable ones do not. Where people do forget bags, would it be possible to have a system of reusable bags that works like we all use and reuse shopping trolleys?

Christopher Sellwood > Christopher Sellwood

22 Feb 2019

Good luck with that, can't even get people to walk their trolley back 10 metres after unloading it.

Lynton Vonow

19 Feb 2019

I would like to see legislation that:
1. requires all of the following (and any other single use plastics) to be made only from compostable materials, when selling in South Australia - disposable nappies, all plastic bags (including bread bags, pasta packets, cereal packets etc), takaway coffee cups, cutlery from takeaway outlets and food vans, crisp packets, sandwich bags, cling wrap, plastic sleeves (office supplies), drinking straws, and wrappings around fruit and vegetables (if necessary to do so) etc.
2. About takeaway coffee cups, in order to be compostable they must not be allowed to be made with non-compostable plastic lining, as some are at present.
3. All fast food outlets must only be allowed to sell compostable containers, so that any rubbish can all be put directly into the green bin, or composted oneself.

Such legislation would send the strongest signal to companies to invest in the manufacture of compostable products. And ultimately such technology and expertise flow on to other places.

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Green Industries SA > Lynton Vonow

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your suggestions Lynton. Compostable items used in takeaway situations need to be accompanied by systems that are carefully designed, with appropriate information, signage and education to work effectively and avoid contamination.

Julia Miller

19 Feb 2019

I agree we should ban single use and thicker plastic bags, and use paper bags when buying and selling fruit and vegetables. However, many people reuse plastic shopping bags as rubbish bags later. If we ban them, we need to provide a greener alternative for domestic rubbish disposal.

Samantha Good > Julia Miller

19 Feb 2019

I absolutely agree with Julia, it really bothers me to see that these very thick plastic bags are being used as rubbish containing bags and so the use of them ends up being counter intuitive and evermore destructive to the environment. Bin liners need to be greener and more environmentally friendly, and the use of thick plastic 're-usable' bags should be banned.

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Green Industries SA > Julia Miller

22 Feb 2019

Thanks for your feedback, Julia and Samantha. The issue of bag reuse as bin liners (or purchasing plastic bags specifically to line bins) is a recurring theme. The economics of compostable bags may become more favourable as overall demand increases, and people are indicating with their behaviour that they wish to line their domestic bins with something.

david webb

17 Feb 2019

Let South Australia lead the way and introduce world best practice. It is a no brainer single use plastics needs to be eliminated. Legislate no single use plastics can be used / sold in SA from 2025 and offer incentives for business's that drive that agenda in the form of tax relief or lobbying on their behalf federally for R&D support and / or tax relief.
SA can be a world leader in these fields.

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Green Industries SA > david webb

18 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments and ideas David. All of the ideas submitted will be assessed and considered as part of the policy response.

Jess Ljevakovic

17 Feb 2019

Thank you for the opportunity to have a say and have my thought heard.

Plastic is a huge concern for me. We try to reduce our waste as much as possible but it isn't always easy. I would love to see single use plastics banned from produce sections (and phased out throughout stores). It's highly unnecessary. If they can't do it because of how time consuming it is to weigh produce at the checkout then perhaps they should simply leave selling produce to our local produce stores. I'm realistic though and aware of the backlash it would bring from some people that are used to the convenience of plastic. That's where education comes into play. Let's get education starting at shopping centres. Having people in stores to show us options outside the usual is more likely to encourage people to reach for a box or paper bag. We simply place produce in our trolley - we wash it at home anyway.

We collect our soft plastics for recycling to try and do our best to help the problem but here's the thing. The soft plastic recycling programs simply turn soft plastics into hard plastics. We're not solving the issue. It's just shifting it :(

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Green Industries SA > Jess Ljevakovic

18 Feb 2019

Thanks for your thoughts Jess. Successfully addressing this issue is as much about how we shop and our expectations as consumers as it is the materials we use to get our items from the shop to home. The products manufactured from soft plastics at least make use of resources we’ve already produced, and hard plastic products can be recycled again at the end of their useful life, as well as offsetting the use of other resources. But ideally, we would not be perpetuating a stream of single use items which are derived from a non-renewable resource.

Steve McClure

17 Feb 2019

Australia contributes less the two one hundredths of one percent of the total ocean plastic waste of which only a portion is single use plastic. Let's stop using this as a driver. Let's ask the question instead of " how can we improve South Australia's natural environment?". Big ticket items include getting more water in the Murray, creating more natural space through decreasing urban sprawl and increasing the size of our national parks, reversing the urban heat island effect through more trees green walls green roofs and less bitumen, improving air quality through reducing the number of cars on our roads, improving fish stocks through limiting foreign factory trawlers, decreasing poorly designed energy hungry buildings, and stop the development of private resorts within our national parks. Each and every one of those items has a far greater effect on the environment than South Australia's contribution to oceanic plastic. While generally admirable, it seems like this is a warm fuzzy feel good issue that will detract attention and resources away from environmental issues that would have a greater impact.

Steve McClure > Steve McClure

17 Feb 2019

We are focussing on the sliver, and ignoring the log.

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Green Industries SA > Steve McClure

18 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments Steve. Single use plastics are one of many issues the community want addressed. Regardless of the size of Australia’s total contribution to ocean plastic waste, it is still creating a significant impact, including comprising 75% of beach rubbish (www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2018/apr/18/the-great-australian-garbage-map-75-of-beach-rubbish-made-of-plastic).

Steve McClure > Steve McClure

18 Feb 2019

Thank you for the reply. This proposed ban still seems like a solution looking for a problem. If this gains momentum, the tried and true path will be followed: people jump on the bandwagon, look for small ways to improve, become self righteous about what they've done, and then get "environment fatigue" stop doing more things , but leave with a warm fuzzy glow.
I advocate a three step process: 1) identify the big environmental problems we have in the state, 2) identify what we can do about it, 3) determine which solution gets the most bang for our buck.
To follow that:1) There are many more pressing environmental issues in SA than beach litter 2) 99.998 of ocean borne plastic does not originate in South Australia, and of that rubbish that ends up here, we don't know where it originates 3) perhaps a few more rubbish bins, heftier fines for littering, deposits on cigarette butts, and litter traps on the Torrens would be more effective and cheaper?
Or: 1)the Urban Heat island effect is huge since we keep cutting down trees and laying more asphalt, and is a direct cause of increased hospital admissions 2) we can plant more trees, paint roads grey and stop building unnecessary traffic lanes, 3) lots of canopy trees on verges and median strips coupled with green walls and gardens. This is not only plausible, but easily done, and will have a huuuuuuuge impact on the problem. Plus aid in mental and physical health, reduce Airconditioning costs and reduce hospital emissions.
I oppose the single use plastics ban because is is an ineffective, inefficient feel good measure that detracts attention from actions that are cheaper, more effective, and have wider benefits.

Joanne Fiedler

16 Feb 2019

BioBag is the best option. Now that BioBag is manufacturing in Adelaide what a better way to support jobs in Adelaide and be a leader in environmental products and saving our planet. (By the way I do not have any connection to BioBag, I just use and love there products).
If we have to use packaging it should be biodegradable or at the very least make from recycled materials. I have gone plastic free this month and it’s not that hard.

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Green Industries SA > Joanne Fiedler

18 Feb 2019

Thanks Joanne, and well done on your plastic free efforts. It’s important that anything going in the green bin is compostable. Check out the Appendix in the discussion paper for definitions: http://tinyurl.com/singleuseplasticsdiscussion

Belinda H

15 Feb 2019

It is important to consider users when bringing in a ban. What alternatives are there? Are they of similar cost? Can they perform the same function (to the same level)?
The furor around the bans for plastic straws saw the general public demonising disabled people who utilise the utensils. 'Just use a metal/bamboo/paper/silicone one' is a common retort. But none of them perform the same function, offer the same cost benefits or the same levels of hygiene etc.
And the cost should not be borne by those most vulnerable in the community. They should not feel judged for asking for a straw. Nor should they all suddenly be too far removed from sight or reach so they cannot be seen over the counter.
If such a ban comes in place, any and all replacements must be considered to ensure 100% inclusivity of all our community.

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Green Industries SA > Belinda H

18 Feb 2019

Thanks for your comments Belinda. This issue has been raised by previous respondents, but will reiterate here: we really appreciate you making this particular point. It’s exactly this kind of nuance that these consultations seek to discover, so that any policy decisions take into account all kinds of circumstances. We recognise that many people with disabilities rely on straws to eat and drink, and while there are alternative straws on the market, cost and availability are an important consideration. The needs of people with disabilities who depend on straws will be taken into account when determining the best approach.

Ellen Wundersitz

12 Feb 2019

Supply mushroom style paper bags for fruit and veg instead of plastic. They are compostable.

Ellen Wundersitz

12 Feb 2019

Encourage supermarkets to supply the old brown paper style of grocery bag (instead of the plastic ones), if people MUST have something to cart their groceries away in. These bags would fit well into the modern style of rectangular bin and would eliminate the need to purchase plastic kitchen bin liners. They would also be compostable and/or biodegradable, plus could be made from recycled paper. One less stream of plastic.

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Green Industries SA > Ellen Wundersitz

13 Feb 2019

Thanks for your feedback Ellen. We need to think about how to balance the convenience people seem to want with how we can minimise single use items. One question is, if single use plastic packaging has become problematic, then what happens when we shift that demand by using another material?

Jess Ljevakovic > Ellen Wundersitz

17 Feb 2019

Green Industries SA - that's an incredibly close minded question to ask. We are surrounded by options in our great state!

How about stepping up and taking responsibility for our large amounts of clothing and other fabrics to turn those into reusable bags?

Having council's step up their education of residents would be equally important. I wonder how many realise how to properly utilise their bin system as it Is!

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Green Industries SA > Ellen Wundersitz

18 Feb 2019

Hi Jess, thank you for your perspective. We think its important to remain open to all kinds of questions, and if we are to avoid unintended consequences, it’s worth considering what impact any replacement material for single use plastics would have. We agree that we all need to take responsibility for our choices in how and what we purchase. Our initial focus for this discussion is around single use plastics. It may be that alternate materials can be used, for packaging, and we are certainly aware that fabric in particular is very hard to recover and recycle at its end of life. Our agency is currently working very closely with councils and local government to roll out much more education to householders in the coming months on how best to use their household recycling systems.

Emmy Bedford

11 Feb 2019

Hi Team Environmentalist, Thanks For Your Forum I Love The Subject .
I Personally Believe Environmental Can Be Done With Discipline ,Uniforms ,Rewarded.
Discipline I Mean EFFORTS from Those Who Are Campaigning The Subject .
Uniforms I Mean Label To Your Objects Or Tools , sample : Wouldn't That Be Great If Take Away Coffe Not Serve Their Cappuccinos in COMMERCIAL CUP , Give Customer Courages To Buy The Solid Cup And Next time order cappuccinos Bring Your Own Cup And Reward The Customer With healthy Cookies Or Snacks .
Do The Same To Many Other More Products Or Things . DO THE SOLID .

Hopefully We All Feel Good About The GOOD OUTCOMES .

Thank You For This Opportunity For What I Want Or Have To Say .

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Green Industries SA > Emmy Bedford

13 Feb 2019

Thank you Emmy for your comments and passion about this issue.

Darrell O'Brien

11 Feb 2019

Zeoform is derived from lignocellulosic biomass, such as hemp, cotton, bamboo, sisal, jute, palm, coconut and other cellulose feedstock.[5][6] It is made without any glues, binders, chemicals or synthetics. The fundamental chemistry (and patented formula) causes a fibrillation (feathering) of cellulose micro-fibres (in water), then physical ‘entanglement’ and hydroxyl bonding through evaporation.[7] The result is a super-strong, highly durable, consistent material that emulates wood & wood composites, resin composites, fibreglass and many hard plastics. Zeoform can be produced with various qualities – from light styrofoam to dense ebony. The material is sustainable, compostable and sequesters carbon.[8]

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Green Industries SA > Darrell O'Brien

13 Feb 2019

Thanks Darrell, there are lots of interesting traditional and new materials to consider.