What are your thoughts on the revised draft Planning and Design Code?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 9 November to 18 December 2020. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

We want your feedback on the revised Planning and Design Code for South Australia.

Read the New planning system summaryPost-Consultation Amendments and FAQs

For more information including brochures and factsheets, please visit the PlanSA portal. Useful information is also available in the Resources tab.

Share your thoughts by joining the discussion below. 

Your submission will be published on the PlanSA portal. Personal addresses, email and phone numbers are not published; however, company details are.

Comments closed

Julie-Ann Bennett

18 Dec 2020

Public notification (Page 9)

'The Commission proposes to amend the Code to exempt performance assessed development envisaged in zones from notification where it meets acceptable standards of built form or intensity and is not likely to result in substantial impacts on the amenity of adjacent dwellings located on land in another zone.

In the residential ‘neighbourhood’ zones in the Code, this means that most residential forms of development will not be subject to notification unless they exceed the maximum building height specified in the zone. Nonresidential forms of development (shops, offices, consulting rooms) will not be subject to notification unless they exceed the maximum gross leasable floor area limits in the zone (which are generally 50-200m2 ).'

The reason PlanSA have given is...

'A range of submissions from different stakeholders raised concern that public notification triggers appear to require much more public notification.'

Public notification before a decision is made ensures members of the public and neighbouring properties are aware of the development and have the opportunity to make submissions which may improve upon the proposed development and minimise the impact on existing residents.

Who are these stakeholders who want to simplify and speed up development approvals? I am concerned the negatives will outweigh any benefits like reducing admin work, costs and delays?

#LOVECampbelltown

Government Agency

Planning Reform > Julie-Ann Bennett

18 Dec 2020

Hi Julie-Ann,

Thanks again for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Susan Lloyd

18 Dec 2020

I would like to see a minimum percentage (at least 10 - 20%) of unroofed area on all residential blocks. Current new residences take up a large percentage of block area in Campbelltown and with inadequate storage provision in many properties, the remaining land is then covered in sheds and verandahs resulting in even less land for greenery and certainly very little hope for shade trees.
Some charges to developers that actually seriously reflect the costs of replacing mature trees would also be good.
At the moment in the overall cost of a development there is really very little incentive for developers to retain trees that provide vital habitat and shade in suburban areas.
Distribution of at least a reasonable proportion of funds entering the Open Space Fund back to local councils to enable them to purchase additional land in areas with high density development would also be appreciated.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Susan Lloyd

18 Dec 2020

Hi Susan,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Bas de Groot

18 Dec 2020

Could I ask how the Register of Aboriginal Sites and Objects as mentioned in the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1988 is included in the Code? Is the register ever consulted when planning is done? Is the Aboriginal Heritage Committee ever involved in the planning process?

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Bas de Groot

18 Dec 2020

Hi Bas,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Darren Kerwood

18 Dec 2020

I am frustrated with developments that leave bumpy road patches on the roads when new services are provided for multiple houses where there used to be only one - developers should pay a fee to have the whole street re-bituminized ASAP after most of the street is done. There needs to be sufficient off-street parking - and parking alotments for busy times when guests visit. Kurrulta Park is particularly bad.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Darren Kerwood

18 Dec 2020

Hi Darren,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Malgo Schmidt

18 Dec 2020

Planning is not my area of expertise. One thing is obvious to me, though: we can no longer clear any vegetation in Australia.

1) Australia is the global leader in animal extinction, due to deforestation and environmental degradation.

2) Australia is the global leader in CO2 emission per capita, while additionally exporting massive means of emission worldwide.

3) Australia’s bush is being disproportionally and irreversibly destroyed by fires, to the acceleration of global warming and to the horror of the rest of the world.

Meanwhile, the horrendous destruction of dune vegetation (being replaced by solar panels!) between Hallet Cove Beach and Lonsdale goes on. I recently heard that these are not the only dunes targeted by the South Australian environmental criminals.

A newly planned anti-flora activity of the South Australian government, at the cnr of Cross Rd and Fullarton Rd, involves destruction of 20 trees, some of which are over 100 years old. They are to be replaced by a road (!)

https://indaily.com.au/news/2020/12/04/historic-urrbrae-gatehouse-to-be-bulldozed-but-study-finds-relocating-it-is-feasible/

I wish to state that we urgently need Plant Protection Laws. Significant trees are not replaceable, as no new trees will grow to maturity in the new climate. All native vegetation must be preserved. New legislation is necessary, to the effect that no one, including local and state government, can “own” a tree, or destroy any native vegetation, by mechanical or chemical means. Perhaps the task of Plant Protection state-wide requires a full-time specialist, due to its crucial importance to the climate, and to the animals, including H. sapiens. By "specialist" i mean a person with degree & experience in environment/plant protection.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Malgo Schmidt

18 Dec 2020

Hi Malgo,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning & Design Coe (Code).

The Code supports the protection of native vegetation, Significant and Regulated trees and includes tree planting and soft landscaping requirements for new housing developments.

In addition, the revised Code supports the broader community interest of preserving and increasing tree canopy, and proposes the introduction of the Urban Tree Canopy Overlay, which encourages the retention of existing trees and the provision for new trees when undertaking development.

These measures are outlined in the 'Preserving our Green Infrastructure' brochure in the Resources section of this consultation page (https://yoursay.sa.gov.au/decisions/revised-planning-and-design-code-consultation/resources).

We hope you find the above information helpful. If you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team.

Marty Cielens

17 Dec 2020

As a resident of Charles Sturt Council, I have long been disturbed by the ongoing sanctioned destruction of our city’s tree canopy and associated understory vegetation. A new Design and Planning Code should stop this trend and include targets that significantly increase our tree canopy into the future.

It is the responsibility of governments to mandate development of urban environments that foster the health and wellbeing of people who live in them. We should listen to research that points to the important role that trees play in the health of our urban landscape.

“Trees play a critical role for people and the planet. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the presence of trees and urban nature can improve people's mental and physical health, children's attention and test scores, the property values in a neighborhood, and beyond. Trees cool our urban centers. Trees are essential for healthy communities and people. The benefits that trees provide can help cities and countries meet 15 of the 17 internationally supported United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.” J. B. Turner‐Skoff and N. Cavender, Plant sciences for the Anthropocene: What can we learn from research in urban areas? New Phytologist Foundation, May 2020

A 2003 paper by the Warwick District Council in the UK summarising research on the benefits of urban trees found benefits ranged from economic (consumer behaviour, inward investment and property values), social (crime reduction and outdoor activity) through to environmental (pollution interception, carbon sequestration and noise reduction).

These reports scratch the surface of the research findings that stretch back many years, And yet we continue to ignore the obvious and sanction the destruction of established plantings while reducing targets going into the future.

If the Covid pandemic has taught us anything, it is that decisions should be based on scientific evidence, not short term economic benefits. Governments that ignored the science inflicted incredible suffering on their citizens, while those that behaved rationally have so far avoided the worst of the pandemic.

Not greening our urban landscape may not kill people in the short term, but it will compromise their long term health and well-being and deny them a range of future economic and social benefits. A soft approach to this issue economically benefits governments and developers in the short term and shifts the cost of these policies onto future generations.

Trees should be considered an important part of the equation by developers, project managers and government policy makers as we all work towards reaching basic sustainability goals.

A new code gives us an opportunity to enhance, rather than diminish our environment, and send a message that South Australia is a great place to live, one that values the health and wellbeing of everyone.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Marty Cielens

18 Dec 2020

Hi Marty,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

The Code supports the protection of native vegetation, Significant and Regulated trees and includes tree planting and soft landscaping requirements for new housing developments.

These measures are outlined in the ‘Preserving our Green Infrastructure’ and ‘Raising the Bar on Residential Infill’ brochure in the Resources section of this consultation page (https://yoursay.sa.gov.au/decisions/revised-planning-and-design-code-consultation/resources).

In support of the broader community interest of preserving and increasing tree canopy, the revised Code proposes the introduction of the Urban Tree Canopy Overlay, which encourages the retention of existing trees and the provision for new trees when undertaking development, such as infill housing.

With regard to climate change mitigation and tree planting, the revised Code requires a minimum provision of 24m2 of private open space to the side or rear of dwellings. This requirement must be met in addition to other requirements relating to site coverage, soft landscaping, tree planting and the provision of rainwater tanks.
The Code includes the requirement to plan for incorporate deep soil zones into a proposed development (for more substantial multi-storey projects) to accommodate sustainable tree planting and canopy growth.

We hope you find the above information helpful. If you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

David Bennett

16 Dec 2020

Re the reply you gave to my comments: Just repeating the planning code stipulations to me as a result of my comments implies you don't really give any credence to my thoughts at all. So much for public consultation. Your minds are all made up so why bother asking for our comments?

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Bennett

17 Dec 2020

Hi David,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Julie-Ann Bennett

16 Dec 2020

I value trees in the City of Campbelltown. #LOVECampbelltown Please legislate adequate minimum green space for new development (both residential and commercial), to ensure current and future trees may grow and thrive. Minimum residential block sizes of 250 sqm here (up from 150 sqm last year), is still wholly inadequate given there has been no increase in quality public green space through the Open Space Fund.
I agree with other comments stating that people are largely unaware of this consultation. In the City of Campbelltown there were no community information sessions held. Given infill development and planning policy is a major issue here I question why.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Julie-Ann Bennett

17 Dec 2020

Hi Julie-Ann, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Greg Toop

16 Dec 2020

Thank you for the opportunity to attend a public meeting held at Glenunga last week to review the proposed Plan SA changes for SA. In particular I would like to thank Brett Steiner for taking me though the areas of interest I have in the changes and how they may affect our Industrial Development in the Murray Bridge Council in particular the Primary Production Zone Central Policy Area 3 and more specifically Precinct 23 Flagstaff Road.
A DPA for this Precinct was completed in 2018 creating an area within the Primary Production Zone to accommodate a whole range of Industrial and job creating industries. In particular a new Ingham's Chicken Feedmill supporting major SA Industries of Big River Pork, and Sunpork farm feed mill.
The "Precinct 23 Flagstaff Zone" had a few issues when put to the "practical test" which were brought to Planning SA's attention by our Planners (Masterplan) and were to be rectified in subsequent reviews of the Plan.
On reviewing the proposed Planning Code for this property and how it impacts on our Industrial development we found that this "Precinct 23 Flagstaff Road" provision has disappeared and reverted to "Rural Intensive Enterprise" with the inherent difficulties that this change makes to future development of the site and Precinct 23.
We request an immediate review of why this change has been made and or how we can continue to develop this property.
DA applications are ready to be lodged for some $15million + of investment in industries, jobs and energy technology (Solar/Thermal Microgrid) on the understanding that no fundamental change was envisaged in this Land use but improvements already identified taken up in this Land use .
All correspondence is available for consideration - on request.
We remain very concerned that the Plan will be adopted without further consultation, review and rectification.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Greg Toop

18 Dec 2020

Hi Greg,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

David Bennett

13 Dec 2020

I couldn't agree more with the comments here. I only became aware of this consultation when a few days ago I wrote to the Port Adelaide council about the incredibly inappropriate development of flats on Fourth Avenue Klemzig. This shows how inadequate your offer of consultation is. The public at large have no idea of this code and the changes you are proposing. I looked up my own property on the Portal and found out nothing other than that it is apparently not subject to the PDI - whatever that means and it couldn't even find my Klemzig address when I went into the section about getting approvals for any kind of development. It seems to me that this is a huge bureaucratic, jargon filled document that, maybe, professional planners and, of course, developers will possibly make sense of. For example what do these terms mean to a layperson: 'strategic innovation zones', 'the principle (wrong spelling) organizing layer', 'assessment pathway', 'agency referral triggers', 'to exempt performance assessed development', etc, etc? And how can developments for housing that only need a 300 square metre area possibly have any room for meaningful plantings that may help in the mitigation of climate change? 24 metres to be set aside for this is a joke. It seems the whole code is designed to enable developers to squeeze in developments that will make them lots of money while denying local residents and our councils any say in the matter. In particular it is apparent that houses like mine built in the 60s are targeted for demolition to make way for two or three more dwellings to replace them. Klemzig is an example where this sort of change is rife. A hot suburb in the making which in 20 or 30 years will have to have these buildings torn down so that proper plantings can redress the damage that these so called developments will cause. None of this code pays any attention to climate change.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Bennett

16 Dec 2020

Dear David,

Thank you for your feedback regarding the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

To keep up to date on the latest on the new planning system, we encourage you to join our mailing list (https://plan.sa.gov.au/news) and follow us on social media via our recently launched Facebook page (www.facebook.com/PlanSAGov).

With regards to residential infill development within Klemzig, much of this area currently sits within the Residential Zone (Residential East Policy Area 64) of the Port Adelaide Enfield Development Plan. This policy area currently envisions a variety of dwelling types on a range of allotment sizes, with a predominance of single-storey detached dwellings and a minimum allotment size of 300m2.

Within the revised Code the General Neighbourhood Zone has been applied to this location to reflect the policy position for the area within the current Development Plan.

With regard to climate change mitigation and tree planting, the revised Code requires a minimum provision of 24m2 of private open space to the side or rear of dwellings. However, this requirement must be met in addition to other requirements relating to site coverage, soft landscaping, tree planting and the provision of rainwater tanks.

The specific policy requirements that apply to a development can be found through the “Browse the Planning & Design Code” or “What policies apply to a development?” enquiry tool on the PlanSA Portal.

For an overview of related policy improvements please refer to ‘Raising the Bar on Residential Infill Development’ and ‘Preserving our Green Infrastructure’ brochures, which are part of a series of resources that have been published to help people better understand the policies relating to the environment, residential infill and other improvements that have been made to the Code. You can find them in the Resources section of this consultation page.

We hope you find the above If you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Janice Gamble

13 Dec 2020

I want people to be informed of planned building projects/houses in their suburb and particularly next to homes. This is a right that taxpayers/ratepayers must be given. The government should be acting on our behalf not excluding us from decisions that can have major impacts on the value of our properties, quality of life and the amenity and feel of our suburbs.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Janice Gamble

17 Dec 2020

Hello Janice, thanks for your enquiry and interest in the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

The Code sets out the types of development applications that require public notification as well as certain developments that are excluded from notification requirements.

Public notification is mandatory in the case of development applications that are:

- Performance Assessed (assessment of a development on its merits against the Code), and
- Impact Assessed (restricted developments and developments assessed by the Minister for Planning)

Performance Assessed development applications (that are not subject to any exclusions) are required to notify adjoining land owners, as well as place a sign on the land for everyone to see and comment on the application should they wish.

Impact Assessed development applications (Restricted under the Code, or Assessed by the Minister of Planning) are required to notify adjoining land owners as well as any other affected parties, in addition to placing a sign on the land and putting a public notice in the local newspaper. In the case of developments to be assessed by the Minister, the Minister may also require and undertake additional consultation.

Where development requires public notification, the Code provides several improvements to ensure that all affected neighbours are made aware of the proposal and provided an opportunity to comment. These improvements include:

- A notice/sign placed on the development site during the notification period
- Allowing anyone who sees the notice/sign to submit a representation to the authority
- Increasing the period to comment on performance assessed development from 10 to 15 business days.

Development applications that are not subject to mandatory public notification as per the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 are:

- Accepted (minor and/or standard applications that do not require a planning assessment, but may require building consent to ensure structures are appropriately constructed)
- Deemed-to-Satisfy (applications that meet the requirements of the Code).

With regards to overarching principles of the Code, these are outlined in the New Planning System Summary, which is available on this consultation page. The specific policy requirements that apply to a development can be found through the ‘Browse the Planning and Design Code’ or ‘What policies apply to a development?’ via the enquiry tool on the PlanSA portal.

We hope you find the above information helpful. If you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Rose Ashton

11 Dec 2020

I can't view the whole document as 84MB is too large to download. But what are the overarching principles to the new code? I would hope they would include sustainability - high energy-efficient buildings must be compulsory. Too many high-rise buildings in Adelaide have lots of north-facing & west-facing glass. "The west-facing glass facade looked cool, but was not cool from the inside. The transparent windows turned our living room and the bedroom into big solar panels, constantly absorbing energy from the midday sun. When the sun moved west, everything in the room started barbecuing. Arriving home at 6pm one day, I sat on the sofa, and my bottom was on fire. I was like the Monkey King in the alchemist’s pot, fidgeting but helpless. The only way to cool down was to run the airconditioner at the highest level." Quote from SW newsletter Dec 20-Feb21, Marco Guan & wife Fei. Eaves at the angle to let winter sun in but summer sun out are easy to do & should be compulsory on every building in SA.
Another current example of poor planning is the new Hampden development in Strathalbyn. There's only one exit, making it unsafe in the threat of a bushfire. These developments are not good enough for the long-term. Does the new Planning Code forbid unsafe developments like this?
Climate Change is getting worse quickly. How does the Planning code encourage fossil-free transport over cars? Expanding roads adds to the heat of cities & encourages cars.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Rose Ashton

11 Dec 2020

Hi Rose, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Rose Ashton

16 Dec 2020

Hi Rose,

Thank you for your interest and feedback on the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

The easiest way to find the information you are seeking is to look up what policies apply to a street address or development type rather than download the whole Code which contains the planning policies for the entire state.

If you need assistance with using the Online Code please contact the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

With regards to the overarching principles of the Code, these are outlined in the New Planning System Summary which is available on this consultation page.

The Code contains a wide range of design principles aimed at improving environmental outcomes through zoning, building, siting and design, allotment layout and water sensitive initiatives.

More specifically, buildings are encouraged in the Code to incorporate climate responsive techniques and features such as building and window orientation, use of eaves, verandahs and shading structures, water harvesting, at ground landscaping, green walls and roofs, and photovoltaic cells.

These design principles together with careful zoning that allows for uplift within and near the city centre, close to nodes of public transport and along key urban corridors, creates less reliance on cars.

In terms of bushfire policy, areas potentially affected by bushfire hazard are mapped as overlays in the Code. The purpose of each overlay is to ensure that development, including land division responds to the relative risk of bushfires on life and property. These overlays take into account the potential for increased frequency and intensity of bushfires as a result of climate change.

Another key outcome sought by the bushfire overlays is to facilitate access for evacuation and emergency services. Dead-ends and cul-de-sac road design are not encouraged and land divisions involving 10 or more allotments are required to provide at least two separate and safe exit points to enable multiple avenues of evacuation in the event of a bushfire.

We trust that the above information is of assistance.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Belinda Sullivan

25 Nov 2020

Given the recent lockdown and the continuing COVID restrictions, it has made it very difficult for community groups to gather together and evaluate this latest iteration of the Planning and Design Code. Especially seeing as we are now running into the festive season with holidays, deadlines etc. I live and work in a community with a high proportion of elderly people who are unable to use ZOOM or webinars effectively. You have cancelled just about every consultation event that was scheduled. For the deadline to remain as it is, being 19 December, it will discriminate against these people being able to be involved and give their genuine feedback.

I might add that 6 weeks is an extremely short time for lay persons to evaluate such a complex document.

Would you please consider extending the consultation period to the end of say January 2021, to facilitate genuine community consultation?

With sincere thanks.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Belinda Sullivan

25 Nov 2020

Hi Belinda,

Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team.

Kind regards,
Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Belinda Sullivan

26 Nov 2020

Dear Belinda

Thank you for your enquiry regarding consultation activities for the revised Planning and Design Code.

Whilst we had to postpone some of our face to face engagement activities in November due to COVID-19 restrictions, we are pleased to advise that our metropolitan Community Information Sessions have been rescheduled and will now take place between 2-14 December. Please see below for the event details:

St. Clair Recreational Centre - Wed 2 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/127969647661

Gawler Civic Centre - Fri 4 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/130633531409

Thebarton Community Centre - Mon 7 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/127969300623

Glenunga Hub - Wed 9 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/130633796201

Mount Barker Community Centre - Thu 10 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/130638965663

Noarlunga Centre - Mon 14 December 2020 (4 PM – 8 PM) https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/130640718907

For community members outside of the metropolitan area or for people who would prefer to speak with a Code policy expert online, we are also offering ‘virtual’ community drop-in sessions as well as a ‘How to Make a Code Submission’ webinars.

Community members can register their attendance by visiting the PlanSA events calendar at plan.sa.gov.au or by booking a ticket directly through Eventbrite.

For those people who are unable to access online options, they are welcome to call our PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664 for advice and information.

As we have been able to reschedule our community consultation events, the closing date for submission on the revised Planning and Design Code remains 5pm 18 December 2020.

Peter Holmes

22 Nov 2020

Whilst the Amendment to the code to include Established Neighbourhood Zones and Representative Buildings to reflect/protect built form characteristics, they do not align with the Urban Corridor policy that would allow multistorey buildings abutting the Established zones - the Code can only honour the intent of retaining local built form and local character if there a height limitations along corridors that abut these Zones - trees and setback can only address at best 2x storeys
2. Who and how will Contributory Items be classified as 'Representative Building' - simply by Code 'definition' inclusion, or some other process?

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Peter Holmes

23 Nov 2020

Hi Peter, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Peter Holmes

24 Nov 2020

Hello Peter, thanks again for your enquiry and interest in the revised Planning and Design Code.

Building height is determined by both the Technical and Numeric Variation (TNV) layer and the Interface Height provisions in the Urban Corridor zones.

TNVs prescribe a maximum building height in specified locations in by building levels or in metres, or both. These are viewable in the SA Planning and Property Atlas (SAPPA).

In locations where a TNV for maximum building height is not applied, the planning authority determines an appropriate building height based on the local circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

Interface Height provisions work in conjunction with maximum building level / height requirements by establishing an ‘envelope’ within which buildings are required to be constructed to reduce impacts on adjacent low rise residential allotments in neighbourhood-type zones.

The interface height provisions apply to residential premises whether they are ‘Representative Building’ or not.

‘Representative buildings’ are defined in Part 8 – Administrative Terms and Definitions of the draft Code. They are referenced in Historic Area Statements and Character Area Statements and are recognised as buildings which display characteristics of importance in a particular area.

Representative buildings are also mapped in the SA Property and Planning Atlas (SAPPA).

The map displays each parcel of land containing a representative building.

If you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.