What are your views on the draft design of the Breakout Creek Stage 3 Redevelopment?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 1 September to 27 September 2020. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

Read the Project Information Overview and the draft design and have your say on the Breakout Creek Stage 3 Redevelopment by commenting below.

Please note: Your submissions may be made publicly available in full on the Department for Environment and Water’s website unless you indicate on the submission that you wish for these to remain confidential.

Comments closed

Julie Tang

27 Sep 2020

This is my third post. My opinions here are suppliments to my first post.
I would like to ask the decision makers to have a walk between the Findon Rd Bridge and Henly Road Bridge. You may find, before the Break Creek, in most of the areas, you can only see the dried reeds, which are messy in some areas. While when you reach the creek after Tapley Hill Rd Bridge, it's such a nice change. So green, so pleasant, the water isflowing with a lot of birds. Even without the horses, it should be mainteined this way with only very slight enhencenents, such as better vegitation along the linear parks. Horses will make it much nicer.
I believe the longer the creek is kept as it is, the more unique , and thetefore, more attractive to tourists it will be. I believe, if it can be maiteined not dramatically changed. After years, it will become a great tourist attraction. However, it seems that it is impossible to maintain for long term and even for now. Beside the true believes, achieving a project would be a lot more easier and safer for decision makers than insisting on lnsights.
This is the last piece of river, i do not think the water quality must be treated here.

lisa harding

27 Sep 2020

This redevelopment is a waste of taxpayers monies. The horses have been a drawcard to the area as an attraction, call it a tourist attraction, which you would think was an asset to the area. Green Adelaide, you haven’t seemed to have had the foresight to reflect that in your planning. 25% of this whole space for the horses to be represented is a tragedy. The public visit this space with very obvious intentions which is to visit and feed the horses. Yes there are lots of other recreational activities but the consensus in this area is very much enjoyed because of the openness of this space and the existence of the horses. Simple things are appreciated by thousands of people every year. Enjoying the science supposedly that is planned for this space won’t attract people in the same way. As all wetland areas they are passed through as they are often areas that collect pollution amongst the reeds and the like, which is attributed to upstream. These areas are talked about as being the saviours to water quality and natural habitats. The area as it exists now exhibits very healthy birdlife and pollution from upstream doesn’t collect in the same way in this space as it does in Stages 1 and 2 therefore it doesn’t become an eye sore like elsewhere. Wetlands are so cluttered and don’t give you a feeling of being safe amongst it as unsavoury sorts can take refuge in and around it. Breakout Creek as it stands now should be left well alone to maintain the fabric of history that follows this space with the horses. The horses should be given much more space and priority than is planned for them. Not touching the area at all would be as the public want this space to remain but in the eyes of progress and the lack of understanding this planning committee has for the horses, you need to rethink your position and give priority to history, horses and generations of families and children who love this interaction. Try to look after what is unique and different not just here locally but a lot of people remark who are well travelled people suggesting that this area is very very unique. SAVE THE HORSES THEY ARE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THIS SPACE.

Edward Baxter

27 Sep 2020

Say “NEIGH!”

Megan Eastaughffe

27 Sep 2020

The community have had their say time and time again. Every time it’s overwhelmingly the same. We love the horses, keep the horses - in a meaningful and viable way.

I’m all for improving the way the area looks. Absolutely let’s make more vegetation for the fauna. But please listen to what the community actually want!

Zoe Jones

27 Sep 2020

The Breakout Creek offers a space of tranquillity that a person can contemplate their interaction with either the natural water course which attracts an array of birdlife but within this space the involvement of a taste of the countryside where horses are agisted and where the greater public attend to observe these majestic animals. Horses have been here for years and are related to the history within the area. Something that is so iconic and enjoyed by a large number of people is being very overlooked in the planning by only giving the horses 25% of the 100% they occupy. This area is so different and unique I don't understand why there is the need for it to be changed. Listen to the people and be a little more creating with the space you plan for the horses. They require large amounts of space and the thought of putting them in fenced areas completely changes the fabric of this place. The interaction of the public will have to be in a confined space being all directed to a small area therefore creative than a token design creating a pet zoo environment. This takes the whole atmosphere the horse and horses create away. Take a walk down the river when the horses in a herd thunder down the runway - there is nothing better to experience. Be a bit more creative with your plans taking into account the overwhelming swell of support the horses draw. The horses need more space definitely and 25% is absurd. 12 million dollars could be spent more effectively on more urgent matters, eg COVID vaccinations, road infrastructure, hospitals, the homeless, the list goes on. In this case it seems the need to spend monies recklessly before losing them when financial years turn around with government grants is your plan. Disgraceful.

Eleanor Borthwick

27 Sep 2020

I am opposed to this plan as it does not make any sense whatsoever to spend millions on a nonessential project when there are some very important pressing community issues needing to be addressed in the State. Why change something that is not broken.
I walk the river very regularly 5-6 times a week, it is my regular exercise and I will only walk the Breakout Creek round trip from Seaview Road to Tapleys and back again as it is safer than other parts of the river, I love the beauty of the place with its open fields and of course those magnificent horses. I quite often walk along the paddocks especially on weekends when it is so busy on the bitumen pathway, it is easier underfoot and no hills which is a blessing.
The horses are such a joy and I always anticipate coming across them on my walk. I have lived in the area most of my life and the horses have always been the constant companions. I grew up with them so to speak and not having ever lived on a farm I have been able to get that feeling of an Australian country experience. The horses along with the beach is why I still live here.
Recently during the COVID crisis and lockdown the importance this place has to others like me was astounding. There were literally hundreds and hundreds of people and their families visiting the horses, feeding them, sitting on the banks just watching them and contemplating the world which all of a sudden did not seem so bad even though we were in crisis. I know I connect with horses differently than with other animals including the pets I have had. I don’t know what it is but it feels spiritual or soulful but it is a deep connection.
Having talked to the horse owners on my travels it seems that all they are asking for is 2/3rds of the southern bank. Not much to ask for, for such a huge return that they provide to the community. If it was up to me I would say let them keep it all but in the name of progress, more fool us, why not settle for all the southern side that way the horses will be happy. I understand the numbers will have to reduce which makes me really sad as I have got to know most of them by name.
Please, please, please don’t throw away what is already so wonderful, give the horses more space.

jane Schermer > Eleanor Borthwick

27 Sep 2020

Totally agree Eleanor

Linda Noblet

27 Sep 2020

My husband & I have lived near the Breakout Creek for close on 50 years. Our children, particularly our daughter loved being down near the horses and she even learned to ride a horse. Our Grandchildren have also had much enjoyment from visiting the horses and feeding them carrots and apples. The area where the horses are agisted is the most peaceful area of the river and we feel that we are not even in the suburbs when walking down there. The horses give the area a distinctive appeal. The Riding Club have for many years now cleaned up the horse poo so there really is no need to blame the horses for polluting the sea. We have witnessed much more rubbish that would have come from up stream being washed out to sea after storm events. I say leave the area as is because otherwise to change it would make this part of the river the same as all the other parts with lots of reeds etc. Keep a unique area alive please.

Gerard Ryan

27 Sep 2020

The horses have lost their entire agistment area in Stage 1 and 2 lost one of their arenas and 75% of their area in Stage 3 , FAIR I don’t think so. Adelaide Green say we all have to compromise ? The Horses have been a massive draw card fore the community and visitors even more so during Covid-19. More area is required to sustain the horse and the riding club for the longevity for all to enjoy.

Gerard Ryan

27 Sep 2020

The river is subject to many inputs that pollute its water such as human derived waste and rubbish. Tons of this rubbish infant has to be removed from the rubbish traps. Upsteam toxins from roads and other infrastructure as well as blue green algae are pollutes also from time to time. Widelife also contributes to pollutants with their waste, which goes directly into the water. Contrary to belief horses do not defecate into water but do so on land. Flooding does bring an exceptional amount of pollutants upsteam. To achieve water quality improvement from all water passing through Breakout Creek would require a wetlands with an area of around 500ha. This area of land in not available at Breakout Creek, only in the order of 20ha is available. In discussions at the start of Stage 3 of the wetland development it was stated that the development would make little, if any difference of the water going out to the ocean. There have been many allegations against the horses concerning environmental problems faced at the outlet. One being increased E.coli cells count observed which was ten time higher than the recommended amount. This was proven to be correct however the E.coli present was not from horses but in fact due to increased numbers of bird life to the area. As a result the implications of wetlands making better quality water becomes questionable, as it would lead to increase bird life and further raises of E.coli. This issue require further discussion with Green Adelaide for the best possible solution and for the horses to remain for their owners and the wider community. The River Torrens has provided a unique atmosphere to the western districts, where families can relax, feed and enjoy the horses on the river. Over the years there have been local, interstate And international visitors who have expressed their fondness for this fantastic environment allowing horses to be so close to the city for all to enjoy. Let’s keep it this way!

Mark Jones

27 Sep 2020

Firstly I declare a specific interest as Secretary for Lockleys Riding Club.
We as a Club very much want Breakout Creek to be a space everyone can enjoy. We worked hard and collaboratively during the consultation period to find a solution that would maintain the horses on Breakout Creek. We developed a proposal that reduced the herd size from 20 to 14 on a land allocation of 2/3rds, as an absolute minimum, of the southern side (albeit our preference is for all of the southern side) that would allow the Club to remain viable and accessible to our community. This has not yet been reflected in the current plan up for consultation. We need any future plans and designs to provide the minimum amount of space (2/3rds of the southern side) so that, the land management can remain sustainable and not get degraded, the Club can have sufficient members to remain viable (minimum of 14 horses), that there is enough space to maintain appropriate levels of safety for the public interaction with the horses, our members when feeding and moving horses around, and the horses themselves so they are not confined to such a space that causes injury.
The Club is the only key stakeholder who is compromising at the moment. We have had 100% of our agistment taken away as part of Stage 1 and Stage 2 and now we are facing a further 75% reduction as part of the final Stage 3. Horses have been part of the River for 180 years and helped create the Breakout Creek so that urban development could be advanced something residents have the privilege of enjoying today. Agistment began after that and has occurred since 1936. The horses are an essential part of the culture, story and living history of the western suburbs an iconic attraction that encourages hundreds (and sometimes thousands) of people to visit this part of the Torrens from local residents, Adelaidians of all walks of life, intrastate. interstate and international visitors who come to experience a "little bit of country" in an urban environment. That is something that has been pointed out by others as being internationally significant and unique.
We also must have the infrastructure situated at Military Road on the northern side retained or relocated to another space somewhere on the non-river side of the levy as it is critical facility essential as part of our flood evacuation plan and procedures for horse and member safety.
Lockleys Riding Club remain committed to working with all interested parties to develop a plan that will achieve all our goals and ultimately make this area one we all can be proud of and gain much enjoyment from for many years to come.
With your support we commit to continue working together towards a long-term solution to create a sustainable environment for the horses, a place of celebration of Kaurna culture as well as the wetlands, for all to visit and enjoy.

Toby Thornton

27 Sep 2020

I live very close to the river and walk it most days either by myself or with my family. Myself and our children visit Apex park and the horses because it is a much safer environment than the upstream wetlands. The horse fence provides a safe and defined barrier while still being able to see the wide variety of animal life and Apex Park is just so much better with open spaces so I can see my children at all times. I will not want to visit this new wetlands with my children until they are much older except to visit the horses.
There are plenty of opportunities to experience wetlands both on the river upstream and at Apex Park but also in many spots in the Adelaide metro area and surrounds but there are not the same opportunities to take my family to interact with and educate them about horses. As a local resident and I am very concerned about parking. This section of the river is very popular as it is with the beach close by, Apex Park and especially the horses as hundreds of people visit them and even more on weekends. If this development is as successful as you say it will be then how on earth are you going to control the parking, there is not even enough at Apex Park. There was a report in the paper the other day that said the horse club needs more space to be sustainable why are you not providing that little bit of extra space so they can survive.
One aspect I do like and there should be more of is Kaurna cultural experiences so expand that bit please.
In the plan it says people will interact with the wetlands and all the active and passive activities and spaces, well I don’t see them doing that much in the other wetlands they pretty much stick to the linear path. This section of the river is the only place I see them stop and interact with anything that being the horses. Also I see plenty of people walking along the flat grassed area with their dogs enjoying a stroll without having to dodge bikes, skateboarders and the like, nothing wrong with them it is just a safety thing.
You said that the plan will "unlock 15 hectares of land" and needs to be for the whole community not just for horse owners. That statement could not be further from the reality. I see the horses are for the community first and the owners second, have you seen how many people stop and interact with them and I am down there most days and see the value of the horses to all of us. Plus as I have said before the land is already unlocked and is used by many. I feel you are misleading when you say that.
Also regarding pollution and water improvement. From what I know on this subject this tiny part of the river will have very little difference when it comes to improving water quality. The horse people pick up there manure, and I collect a few bags myself for my garden, but what I do know is that bird and water fowl pollution through their droppings directly into the water would be significantly worse than having some stray horse poo getting into it and with increasing the wetland that is only going to get much worse. Also I feel there is a lot of misinformation on erosion caused by the horses. I am not an expert but the horses have been on this part of the river for decades, much longer than my 40 years in the area, and the land still looks in very good condition to me.
As a local resident living adjacent to the river how are you going to guarantee this new very complex plan won’t cause the water to build up during flooding and breach the levy. In its current form it has not done so as it is incredibly efficient at doing what it is designed to do, but you are now putting in so many more obstacles and putting that at risk.
Finally I have travelled all over the world and I have never seen anything like this space with horses in a lush country setting in the middle of suburbia with easy access to one of the countries best beaches, why would you want to change something that is internationally unique and a totally Aussie country experience available everyday to everybody and the horse people look after all of it and I am sure pay plenty to two councils and to which ever State Government department owns the land.
Please don't ruin this beautiful part of Adelaide, yes improve it but I think the plan goes way too far on the wetlands, not enough on Kaurna and not enough for the horses. I would like to see the horse have all the southern bank and greater Kaurna experience all around including Apex Park.

Bernadette Cranwell

26 Sep 2020

I welcome the development of this area and feel that restoring biodiversity is of high importance and having the involvement of the Kaurna people is vital. Our local fauna and flora have been severely impacted on by settlement and ongoing development and this is a unique opportunity to give back to nature and the environment what we have taken away. I like horses but feel that they are not natural to this area, they are not wild horses, they are owned by individuals. The horses need to be rehomed in a different but suitable environment. Graham Pring has made a sensible suggestion about the land on the southern side of Brownhill Creek. I am sure there are also many other areas. I agree with Andrew Ramsay that the horses add a suburban feel and detract from a natural environment. If the goal is to restore biodiversity, develop a wetland area and filter the water that ultimately ends up in the ocean, plus create a lush green area that supports local fauna and flora and the environment, then I support the horses being moved to another suitable area where they do not impact on this waterway. In the past we did not know the damage that horses and other introduced species can have on the environment. We do not have this excuse any more. Many of our native species are facing extinction and we need to give this area over to them so that they have some hope of survival. Humans will benefit mentally and physically from the creation of an all natural environment.

Jo Filipi

26 Sep 2020

I have lived in Fulham for 15 years and in that time have contacted the council numerous times re access to the linear park from Warramunga Street. The current stairs do not allow access for bikes, prams or wheelchairs. Please ensure the redevelopment includes access for these users at the appropriate gradient.

Toby Thornton > Jo Filipi

27 Sep 2020

This does need to be rectified in the new plan and applies to other access points all around Breakout Creek

Julie Tang

25 Sep 2020

I totally agree with Julie Zucker.

Cathy B

25 Sep 2020

As a long term resident and Linear Park user I am excited by the plans for Breakout creek.What a great mix of new community access and interest areas; habitat building; Kaurna involvement as well as significant functional and aesthetic improvements. I recognise there is a need for delicate balance to achieve the required amount of biofiltration wetlands to improve water quality and create habitats to encourage the return of native species. I am looking forward to the development getting underway.

Andrew Ramsay

25 Sep 2020

As someone who lives in the area and who uses the linear trail, there is a stark contrast going from the initial stages of Breakout Creek into the open channel of the proposed stage 3 site. You are quickly reminded that you are in a human made watercourse of brutalist design. Although the horses are a novelty, the experience is dull and takes you straight back into that Australian suburban feel. This upgrade is a huge opportunity to add another aesthecially beautiful and diverse public space that can be accessed and utilised by many South Australian residents and visitors.

The public benefits clearly outweigh the public costs here. I realise that it is still important to consult the incumbents to the area, but their desires should be considered in proportion compared to the vast majority of other South Australians who would be using this space.

Biodiversity is a clearly underestimated benefit to society when it comes to public spending. Improving biodiversity and water quality heading into the sea along with educating the public on these benefits far outweighs the costs of having fewer horses in the area.

Please consider the needs of the many (which includes the environment) and not the desires of the outspoken few who seek to retain incumbency. Thank you.

Julie Zucker > Andrew Ramsay

25 Sep 2020

Maybe you are the "outspoken few" Andrew. I also live next to the walking trails and use them daily often saying hello to the friendly horse owners. It is a already public space that you are welcome to walk along and many do. There are several openings in the fencing for access. I love this part of the river where you can actually see the birds, chicks, swans, pelicans and on occasion a turtle all coexisting fine with the horses. It also feels safer as a woman walking alone than the overgrown areas further up river. This stretch of the water is also far cleaner than further upstream and when there is only a small amount of water in it in Summer you can see that it is not full of rubbish unlike the wetlands further up which has the assortment of plastics, tennis balls and general rubbish floating in it. These objects also flow downstream after a downpour and they are certainly not thrown in there by the horses. What is wrong with the "Australian suburban feel" by the way and seeing people caring for and enjoying their animals? It is rapidly diminishing thanks to sub division. I have chatted to interstate and overseas visitors I meet that are walking or cycling this part of the river and have never had a negative response quite the opposite in fact. They are amazed and delighted by it and the horses. It is used by many adults, children, visitors and locals already and not just the horses.

Andrew Ramsay > Andrew Ramsay

25 Sep 2020

Thank you for your feedback and for keeping an eye on everyone else's comments.

Julie Tang > Andrew Ramsay

25 Sep 2020

I totally agree with julie Zucker.

Edward Baxter

25 Sep 2020

I love the Breakout Creek section of Linear Park in it’s current layout as it offers some variety to the landscape of the river, with the right amount of trees and open space providing visitors with soothing and unobstructed views of the waterway and greater security of the evening.
It’s the perfect transition between the Stage 1&2 developments and the coast.
The area is a necessary functional creation of civil engineering that really hit the bullseye in terms of beauty, best viewed from the Tapleys Hill Rd. bridge at sunset.
For the past 15 years I have encouraged visitors from interstate and overseas to take in the city to surf Linear Park experience. These are visitors who spend all year every year travelling to the largest cities around the globe. All that journeyed to West Beach quoted Breakout Creek and the horses as the highlight of the route and the total as one of the best inner city suburban experiences they’ve enjoyed anywhere on Earth.

I’m somewhat offended and not surprised that proponents of the Stage 3 plan would have the audacity to include the Kaurna custodians in a purely tokenistic way to help push their agenda.
Let’s see some proof that you genuinely care about indigenous culture and entitlement and return your personal property titles to the Kaurna people.
Right now all you’re offering everyone is lip service.
I’ve read in the comments talk of a gesture of decolonisation... if the Kaurna people chose to permanently set up camp in Breakout Creek the “pro Stage 3“ would be the first to phone the colonial forces to remove them.
It happens everyday.

It’s very clear that opponents to the equine inclusion in Breakout Creek have a very bovine element to their arguments.
Calling horse owners “elitists” is both ignorant and discriminative.
Now the Lockleys Riding Club do pick up after their horses however, on the subject of horse waste as polluting, well it’s really just the presence of nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus that are the concern. Horse manure by the way is composed of broken down vegetable matter not unlike decomposing leaf litter which produces more nitrogen and phosphorus per tonne than horse manure but no one is blaming the 200,000 new trees and plants in the Stage 1&2 sections for their impact on water quality and the increased nitrogen and phosphorus seepage.
Over planting doesn’t bring balance and the regular occurrences of blue-green algal blooms that decimate the aquatic life upstream of Breakout Creek each year are testament to that.
Slowing water flow through a planted wetland is a part of the Stage 3 planned filtration process for improving water quality but slow water flow is also a major contributing factor in the outbreak of blue-green algal blooms.
FYI: blue-green algae is extremely toxic and removes oxygen from the water killing fish, tortoises, birds, frogs and basically anything living within its spread that it comes into contact with.
If anyone is keen to see blue-green algae for the first time in Breakout Creek and it’s effect on the biodiversity of life both above and below the water, vote yes to the Stage 3 plan.
Of course there is no democratic vote.

During the summer months there can be little or no water in Breakout Creek.
The increased vegetation as part of the wetland Stage 3 plan will soak up huge volumes of water in order to survive therefore at a guesstimate, resulting in an absence of surface water for an additional month or so during summer and another death sentence for biodiversity and endangered fish, frogs etc. etc.
Good luck in convincing the Adelaide City Council to empty the Torrens Lake to supply the Breakout Creek with water over summer.
What happens when it floods in winter is anyone’s guess. Better make those boardwalks and viewing platforms higher.
How far the plan was thought through may only be to the point where the $12m ends up in someone’s pocket.

If nothing can stop the Stage 3 plan from going ahead then a 50/50 split is the fairest and most rational option. All of the proposed wetland with additional inclusions can feature with considerate planning and the Lockleys Riding Club can continue to operate.
No... it’s not from the wisdom of Solomon, just common sense which seems to be uncommon and yet to prevail in this pending course of action.
If the horses go it’ll be a win for the boring demographic, much like those decision makers whose decades long lack of worthwhile creativity and innovation has awarded our fine city with the reputation of being the most boring city in the nation.

This Stage 3 proposal will undoubtedly be causing enormous stress in the lives of the Lockleys Riding Club members and as a fellow Australian... I object.
There absolutely should be no losers or victims in the outcome of this development.
Fair go.

Not my twenty cents. I’d call it about a buck twenty.

Julie Tang > Edward Baxter

25 Sep 2020

The first paragraph is also what I want to say, the 2nd is also my experience.

Lola Bennett

24 Sep 2020

I'm concerned about the manure from the horses getting into the water, horse owners may not consider that horse manure contains pollutants and, under the right circumstances, can pose a threat to humans and the environment.
When manure is not managed properly, these contaminants can make their way into our water and cause problems eg running off into our beautiful beach.
Hoof traffic compacts the soil, disturbs vegetation, and increases erosion and runoff.
The pollutants from the poo also kills alot of the native fish, there used to be native Murry River Rainbow fish all through the river now I see nothing.
Not to mention two horses were killed and washed out from flooding.
It's time for the horses to be moved and the rest of the river to continue as a wet lands, for our NATIVE turtles, birds, fish, frogs and plants.

Caitlin O’Callaghan

24 Sep 2020

It seems that the big emphasis for the re-development is about the water quality and a more natural looking water course. What I don’t understand, as someone who frequently walks along the Torrens river is how the horses effect the water quality. You consistently see horse owners out there picking up manure every couple of weeks and the actual quality of the water is much nicer and cleaner where the horses are located as opposed to further upstream where you have already done your phase 1 & 2 re development- the water up there is black sludge in many places. The horses have been along the river for upwards of 60 years and I’m strongly opposed to this re-development meaning that the horses will lose 75% of the land they currently have. They are big animals and they need the space to be able to run and play, and just be animals. I’ve spoken to a few of the horse owners and from my understanding the club will not be viable if this re-development goes ahead due to them having to cut their numbers down from 20 horses to 8. If you walk down the river throughout the day (and especially after school and during the school holidays) you will be able to see how much joy these beautiful animals bring to the general public - the kids love being able to feed and pat the horses and the horses are all so gentle with the children also. The horses should at least be able to have one half of the river left to them, the horse owners are responsible, amazing with the public and always willing to have a chat with them and from what I’ve seen have done everything possible to try and find a compromise with this proposal. Let the horses keep their home!

I feel that more effort should be poured into the general condition of the walking and bike paths which are in horrendous condition, changing the fencing that runs along the river to one that is more attractive, more bins to decrease the amount of rubbish from the public and perhaps the addition of some benches spread along the paths to ensure that people and families can sit and take in the beauty of the river Torrens and the beautiful horses that are already right there.

John Smith

24 Sep 2020

I love the plans but let’s consider the horses too - they provide great interest and education to all the kids that see them, there’s room for everyone

Bert Brown

24 Sep 2020

I think the design concept for Breakout Creek is excellent. It is a positive step for improving the bio diversity of the area. Restoring the area to a more natural eco-system and developing wetlands will enhance the water quality entering the sea and provide better access for all of our community to enjoy. I am concerned that the Lockleys Riding club is wanting to increase, from 25% to 33%, the area for maintaining its horses.
Whist I understand that they have occupied this area for a number of years, their presence and recent requests for expansion are not compatible with the goals of the design plan or for enhancing the bio-diversity of the region. The design plan is an important opportunity for not only revegetating the land but also acknowledging our Kaurna culture with a 40,000 year history. Whilst we are often accused of being tokenistic in acknowledging Kaurna land, this can be an opportunity to demonstrate our respect for restoring the area to a more natural environmental state.

Michelle Sinclair

24 Sep 2020

Please find a way to be able to accommodate new plans and still have the horses remain. The horses bring in a bit of country into the West and I love them so much. I just won't be the same without them.

Michelle Sinclair > Michelle Sinclair

24 Sep 2020

#it

Sarah Dundon

24 Sep 2020

Some of my best memories are on that walk with the horses. They add another element to exercise that cannot be found elsewhere. They bring a lot of people to that area and make it magical. Do not take them away.

Holly Dundon

24 Sep 2020

We should be keeping the horses on the riverbank! They are such an attraction to the walking trail and it would not be as relaxing without them.
It’s sad to think that decisions like these are being made by people who aren’t going to be around for the impact and consequences and who frankly don’t care about the future of the outlet because it won’t concern them. The water quality will always be terrible down there as it is a man made outlet - really don’t think removing the horses has much to do with restoring the environment.

Chris Henderson

23 Sep 2020

Keep the horses on the riverbank, they are an attraction and bring a lovely atmosphere/dynamic.