Why do you value the State's archive?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 8 September to 5 October 2020. Find out more about the consultation process.

 

We want to know why government records and information have value to you and the broader South Australian community.

Read the draft Appraisal Standard and Appraisal Standard Summary and have your say by commenting below.

 

 

Comments closed

David Kilner

24 Sep 2020

You don’t have to keep everything in its original form but surely a major part of this should be digitisation? This would solve the storage problem.
I am Convener of the Prospect Local History Group. I find the document too vague to let me assess whether the records I value will be kept. For example:
Minutes of the District Council and City of Prospect dating back to 1872
Rate assessment books of the said Council
Records such as building application registers
Correspondence files of the Council
Memorandums of Transfers and mortgages lodged with the Land Titles Office back into the 19th Century
Maps, directories and such like
These are essential research tools for historical research.

I also think that you should publish a list of records proposed to be disposed of on your website and allow a period of time for public comment before disposal. You need input from your customer base in order to make good decisions.

Thanks,
David

Government Agency

State Records of South Australia > David Kilner

24 Sep 2020

Thanks for your feedback David. We will consider your thoughts and observations as we refine and finalise the Standard.

Where records are created in physical form we keep them in their original physical form. We do proactively digitise records for improved access, and sometimes for preservation, however we would never have the time or resources to digitise all records, and many would not warrant being digitised.

Bas de Groot

22 Sep 2020

In setting the criteria for records valuation, can State Records cooperate with the State Library? Both institutions manage/preserve collections that include 'Records that support Aboriginal people and tradition', 'Records that document impact on people', 'Records that document impact on place' and especially 'Records of events and changes in society'. Really the only difference is whether those records were created by Government or not, but the impact on society, place and people can in many cases be the same, and so the valuation of those non-governmental records should be on par with the governmental records.

Bas de Groot

22 Sep 2020

The draft standard covers most bases, and is well-written. I just had a few thoughts and observations.
- With the increase in digital data and continuous change in technology, should there not be a criterium for keeping records that document those changes in technology? Without those records, will it not be more difficult, in future, to keep records accessible, or to ascertain the validity of records that have been through several file format changes?
- The draft standard seems to be heading in the direction of macro-selection, but does not provide for the possibility that some government functions might not warrant retention at all: the individual determinations about valuation seem to be not really taken using a top-down vision of society, but mostly by a bottom-up approach by individual agencies, which might miss that overview of society. Continued input from historians on the SRC remains a vital necessity, and should possibly be increased.

Government Agency

State Records of South Australia > Bas de Groot

24 Sep 2020

Thanks for your comment Bas. We will consider your thoughts and observations as we refine and finalise the Standard.