Does the revised Code better address your areas of interest or concern?

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 9 November to 18 December 2020. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement.

 

We want your feedback on the revised Planning and Design Code for South Australia.

Read the New planning system summaryPost-Consultation Amendments and FAQs

For more information including brochures and factsheets, please visit the PlanSA portal. Useful information is also available in the Resources tab.

 

This poll has been closed.

Comments closed

Trude Paladin

17 Dec 2020

I oppose the proposed provisions in the Master Planned General Neighbourhood Zone that would allow developments such as student accommodation, flats etc., to be built without any notice or consultation with neighbours. I understand that some resident groups have made it hard for developments to go through, and that NIMBYs are very annoying, and that it’s very tempting to just get on with developments without the locals even knowing, but the proposed provisions for General Neighbourhood zones go too far the other way. Anything higher than two stories should require consultation, anything changing the use of a street should require consultation. i.e., if a street has never had shops, then residents should be consulted because their street will now be used differently, by traffic that may not be local. People, South Australian people, voters live in neighbourhoods. They are there everyday. Their neighbourhood is their home and they deserve that to be treated with respect, and to be consulted about things which may change how they live in their home.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Trude Paladin

18 Dec 2020

Hi Trude,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Renae Schmidt

16 Dec 2020

I may have missed it, but does the code have anything in there about when people submit applications for subdivisions or zone changes and who approves the applications or does not allow them. As we have previously requested this and been told no to our land, but others who applied after were given approval because they obviously knew the right people. People in the city saying money can be made off the land and zoning it primary production when the land size is not big enough and the rainfall not high enough to produce anything viable on it. It is and would be great for small acreage blocks where people can grow there food on it with decent backyards.
I think we need to stop allowing good farm land to be turned into urban residential. There is plenty of land in the country to live on that is not farm able. How about decreasing urban sprawl. Adelaide and surroundings were once great farmland. We won't be able to feed ourselves soon

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Renae Schmidt

18 Dec 2020

Hi Renae,

Thank you for your feedback and interest in the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

In reference to your queries about zoning requests and applications for subdivision; the revised Code includes zones, subzones and overlays that will be applied to parts of the State for the first time.

The proposed zoning in the Code is informed by existing zoning in development plans. Decisions on subdivision applications are typically determined by the local council and are currently made under the Development Act 1993 system.

When the revised Code is implemented, applications made after the commencement date will be determined under the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016. The relevant authority for determining applications can change depending on the nature of a proposed development.

Information about relevant authorities is available on the PlanSA portal (https://plan.sa.gov.au/development_applications/getting_approval/how_applications_are_assessed/relevant_authorities).

For land division applications, land division consent is determined by an Assessment Manager in most cases and is based on relevant provisions in the Code. An Assessment Manager is someone appointed by a council.

Amendments to the Code can be made through the Code Amendment process. The PlanSA portal also contains information about ‘Amending the Code’: https://plan.sa.gov.au/our_planning_system/instruments/planning_instruments/planning_and_design_code.

Code amendments (including rezoning) are adopted by the Minister responsible for administering the Planning Development and Infrastructure Act 2016. Once the revised Code has been implemented, a Code amendment process may be commenced. It would be worthwhile discussing this with your local council in the first instance to determine if there are reasonable grounds to pursue a strategic review of the zoning in the wider area that includes your property.

We hope you find the above information helpful. Should you need further assistance please call the PlanSA Service Desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards
Planning Reform Team

Julie-Ann Bennett

16 Dec 2020

I agree with this comment by Jodie Sheldrick.

'The plan should ensure that child care centres are built in good places for children like schools. It is crazy how many child care centres are built on main roads that are noisy dangerous and busy. All child care centres should have to pass a test as to whether they are suitable places for children. Councils don't check if they are too noisy or dangerous first. There must be someone looking out for kids instead of letting developers decide where they can make a dollar. Please add something to the plan that makes sure an child-focused expert reviews locations first.'

On Gorge Road a child care centre is being constructed next to a petrol station and pub/pokies/bottle shop with a serious lack of quality and quantity green space. The play equipment is metres from the road, an obvious safety hazard. Fire risk and evacuation is another issue. Noise, traffic, air pollution... This is a clear example of letting developers make a dollar without consideration for what children and families need.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Julie-Ann Bennett

16 Dec 2020

Hi Julie-Ann,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Please note our reply to Jodie Sheldrick's comment in relation to your comment.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team.

David Donaldson

15 Dec 2020

The previous system was so provincial in outlook. Whatever the technical objections of some people, this at least is an overall plan for the state.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Donaldson

16 Dec 2020

Hi David,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Deane Crabb

15 Dec 2020

Still does address conflict between broadacre agriculture and more intensive horticulture/viticulture when there is a change from broadacre to more intensive farming.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Deane Crabb

16 Dec 2020

Hi Deane,

Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team.

Kind Regards, Planning Reform Team

Adam Flatau

15 Dec 2020

You're reducing space for nature on private land.
You're moving towards a cityscape, making more Australians live in concrete boxes (small boxes that you can lock up) and put a greater strain on the ecosystem and environment surrounding. Quality is not in the interest of the Code, as the code is promoting a development company/business to cater to a customer for profit. The State Government workers all involved in changing this Code should grab a camp chair and sit in it for a day in 40+ Degrees Celsius heat on a paved driveway, to ponder and understand the "Quality" they are envisioning.
Cars are an eye-sore and should be stored out of sight such as basement driveways under houses, neither on the roads, or on potential vegetation-producing land. The Adelaide plains used to be flat mangroves with a complex ecosystem, now destroyed by development.
It is disappointing the land is further being subdivided for more immigration, rather than supporting environmental equilibrium and better service.
The council, state government AND federal government could start by supporting Australians wanting to own their own house. Subdivision and profit growth charts are what appears to be behind the "iron curtain" (or better coined "concrete curtain") to the State Governments proposed Code.
My disappointment to the obfuscations that go on surrounding grand decisions in Australia cause me grief and make me even more depressed in this spoiled country.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Adam Flatau

16 Dec 2020

Hi Adam,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Cornelis Escabache

12 Dec 2020

Allowing to build large houses on small blocks is now causing major problems in suburbia. In our area it is already to late to change. If there have to changes than I believe that every house build should have room for 1 more car park than the amount of bedrooms available. If a house has 2 bedrooms it should have 3 car parks. No hammerhead development should be allowed as this is causing the people living in the back parking on the road in front of the people living in front. No commercial properties to be allowed in suburbia. Also every home should have more open space as what is acceptable on the moment. We are destroying the Australian way of living.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Cornelis Escabache

16 Dec 2020

Hello Cornelis,

Thanks for your feedback and interest in the revised Planning and Design Code.

The revised Planning and Design Code proposes a range of policy improvements to address matters related to car parking and garaging. These include refinements to the provision of on-site parking and the retention of on-street parking, including for hammerhead allotments, garage door and driveway width, internal garage dimensions.

A range of other refinements are proposed which relate to the provision of private open space in addition to site coverage, soft landscaping, and tree planting. Specific policy content can be seen through the “Browse the Planning & Design Code” or “What policies apply to a development?” enquiry tool on the Portal.

For an overview of these policy improvements please refer to the 'Raising the bar on Residential Infill in the Planning and Design Code' brochure, which is part of series of resources that have been published to help people better understand the policies relating to the environment, residential infill and other improvements that have been made to the Code. You can find them in the Resources section of this consultation page.

We hope you find the above information helpful. Should you need further assistance or information please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

David Hay

11 Dec 2020

Hi there,

I am very much against any proposed changes to planning laws that remove street appeal and aesthetic (trees, frontages), to create ugly, high density living developments that are cheap, fast-tracked and look identical.

Kind regards

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Hay

11 Dec 2020

Hi David, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Hay

15 Dec 2020

Hi David, thank you for your feedback on the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

The revised Code offers a wide variety of improvements to residential infill that will preserve and enhance residential amenity and supports the demand for well-designed, high quality infill.

Current infill development is not required to address street appeal and appearance; however, the policy in the revised Code aims to improve visual interest, building articulation and design features by providing options for different materials/finishes, improvements to dwelling front windows, entry doors and bin storage.

The revised Code also aims to protect native vegetation, Significant and Regulated trees and includes tree planting and soft landscaping requirements. In support of the broader community interest of preserving and increasing tree canopy, the revised Code proposes the introduction of the Urban Tree Canopy Overlay, which encourages the retention of existing trees and the provision for new trees when undertaking development, such as infill housing. For more substantial multi-story projects, the Code includes the requirement to plan for and incorporate deep soil zones into a proposed development to accommodate sustainable tree planting and canopy growth.

For further details please refer to the 'Preserving our Green Infrastructure' and 'Raising the bar on Residential Infill in the Planning and Design Code' brochures which have been published to help people better understand the policies relating to the environment, residential infill and other improvements that have been made to the Code. You can find both brochures in the Resources section of this consultation page.

We hope you find the above information helpful. Should you need further assistance or information please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Adam Flatau > David Hay

15 Dec 2020

Hi Planning Reform Team,

It seems as there are a lot of hopeful keywords in the statements replied by the Planning Reform Team. Words such as "will", "policy" and "aim" are words that do not provide firm assertion.
"Demand for well-designed, high quality infill" - They key word is "demand" and therefore not "set in concrete", as demand can fluctuate, or even evaporate. I do not see a bottom-line, financed appeal that customers will ultimately be drawn to, to "the policy in the revised Code". For customers, I am referring to YOUR INDIVIDUAL RESIDENTS and not some over-empowered developer who is in bed with the councils financial interests.

In earlier posts, you mention "highly sensitive" information about Aboriginal heritage. How do we know that similar decisions for example, removal of a tree by a developer, are NOT kept "highly sensitive" and confidential similarly from the public, due to obfuscation of the project objectives and profiteering? How is this established by the Code?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindmarsh_Island_bridge_controversy

Looking forward to cheaper, sparser and lesser human-invaded development.

K, tnx
Bye

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > David Hay

18 Dec 2020

Hi Adam,

Thank you for your feedback to the revised Planning and Design Code (Code). Your comments will be included as part of the consultation.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Tyler Hughes

05 Dec 2020

The code needs to incentivise developers to maintain and keep trees rather than demolish them. Trees are vital to our community and land value. It’s about time that the DPTI started caring.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Tyler Hughes

07 Dec 2020

Hi Tyler, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Tyler Hughes

08 Dec 2020

Hello Tyler,

Thank you for your feedback on the Planning and Design Code (Code).

To support the Code consultation, the 'Preserving our Green Infrastructure' brochure has been published to help people understand the policies relating to the environment and the improvements that have been made in the Code.

The brochure outlines how the Code will protect native vegetation, Significant and Regulated trees and include tree planning and soft landscaping requirements in order for Development Applications to achieve relevant approvals.

You can find the 'Preserving our Green Infrastructure' brochure in the Resources section of this consultation page (https://yoursay.sa.gov.au/decisions/revised-planning-and-design-code-consultation/resources).

In relation to the broader community interest of preserving and increasing tree canopy, the revised Code proposes the introduction of the Urban Tree Canopy Overlay, which encourages the retention of existing trees and the provision for new trees when undertaking development, such as infill housing.

For more substantial multi-storey projects, the Code includes the requirement to plan for and incorporate deep soil zones into a proposed development to accommodate sustainable tree planting and canopy growth.

Should you need further assistance or information please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

lyall ross

04 Dec 2020

I just want to note that every one wants to do everything on line, so you can track and trace it all, but not every one has a computer or can afford expensive internet , so it makes it hard for these people to get service when you close down public access to this sort of information.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > lyall ross

04 Dec 2020

Hi Lyall, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team.
Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > lyall ross

04 Dec 2020

Hello Lyall,

Thank you for your interest and feedback on the revised Planning and Design Code (Code).

While acknowledging that we now live in an increasingly digital world where core services are being digitized for quicker and better access for all; we are mindful of ensuring non-digital citizens are provided with multiple ways to provide their feedback on the revised Code.

For the consultation period, people who do not have access to the online Code, can:

- attend face-to-face community information sessions being held across various locations until 15 December 2020. Please refer to the events section on this consultation page for more information.

- call the PlanSA service desk to speak with someone directly to share their feedback or make enquiries about the Code.

- provide a submission by email, if they do not have access to the online Code Feedback Tool.

In addition, when the new planning system goes live next year (for urban and metropolitan areas), people without access to IT resources or equipment will still be able to submit a hard copy of their Development Applications to their respective councils, who will enter it into the ePlanning platform for them.

Should you need further assistance please call the PlanSA service desk on 1800 752 664.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Peter Holmes

22 Nov 2020

Urban Corridor policies need to ensure maximum building heights of not more than 2x storeys where they directly abut Residential Neighbourhood Zones and Representative Buildings

Can someone point to a definition of "storey" in terms of metres !!

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Peter Holmes

23 Nov 2020

Hi Peter, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Peter Holmes

24 Nov 2020

Hello Peter, thank you for your interest in the revised draft Planning and Design Code (the Code).

Definitions of the terms used in the Code can be found in Part 8 - Administrative Terms and Definitions.

Please note there is no definition for ‘storey’ in the Code as ‘building height' and 'building level’ are the terms used.

Building height is addressed in the Code under each zone as it needs to be adapted to local circumstances and the development activities intended for that specific zone.

For example, the building height in metres for a house may not be appropriate for commercial (e.g. shops) and/or recreational uses (e.g.: library, community hall or an indoor recreation centre).

Alayna de Graaf

19 Nov 2020

The code hardly provides any protections what so ever for Aboriginal Heritage.
FIX IT PLEASE.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Alayna de Graaf

23 Nov 2020

Hi Alayna, Thank you for your feedback, we have passed it on to our planning team. Cheers, Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Alayna de Graaf

24 Nov 2020

Hi Alayna,

Thank you for your interest in the revised Planning and Design Code.

Aboriginal Heritage is currently managed via a separate legislative framework under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1988, and details are recorded on the Register of Aboriginal Sites and Objects. Information about Aboriginal heritage can be highly sensitive, and for cultural reasons, is often kept confidential.

As such, significant consultation and negotiations with key stakeholders would need to be undertaken and agreements reached before consideration could be given to reflecting it in the Code.

Thanks,
Planning Reform Team

Jodie Sheldrick

10 Nov 2020

The plan should ensure that child care centres are built in good places for children like schools. It is crazy how many child care centres are built on main roads that are noisy dangerous and busy. All child care centres should have to pass a test as to whether they are suitable places for children. Councils don't check if they are too noisy or dangerous first. There must be someone looking out for kids instead of letting developers decide where they can make a dollar. Please add something to the plan that makes sure an child-focused expert reviews locations first.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Jodie Sheldrick

11 Nov 2020

Thanks for your feedback Jodie,
All feedback will be passed on to our planning team.
Cheers,
Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Jodie Sheldrick

13 Nov 2020

Dear Jodie, thank you for your query regarding child care centres in the revised Planning and Design Code (the Code).

The Code includes a number of policies that consider how child care centres are designed and where they are located to protect children, staff and parents from the impacts of adjoining land uses (such as noise).

In addition, the Code provides policies that safely integrate these centres with surrounding transport systems such as main roads, vehicle and pedestrian access, access for people with disabilities and parking areas.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team

Jodie Sheldrick

10 Nov 2020

Can you please ensure productive farmland is protected in the Adelaide Hills particularly Hahndorf. The entrances to township are not protected by Heritage. The open areas on the approach to Hahndorf need to be protected and increased.The protection area should be increased to maintain the entrances to township.

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Jodie Sheldrick

10 Nov 2020

Hi Jodie,
Thank you for your feedback. All feedback will be passed on to our planning team. Cheers,
Planning Reform Team

Government Agency

Planning Reform Team > Jodie Sheldrick

13 Nov 2020

Dear Jodie, thank you for your query regarding the protection of productive farmland in the Adelaide Hills.

Within the revised Planning and Design Code, areas surrounding the Hahndorf township will be included in the Adelaide Country Zone.

This zone includes a number of policies that will ensure development minimises the potential loss of land available for primary production, as well as guide the location and scale of development to maintain the natural and rural character of the area.

Kind Regards,
Planning Reform Team