Stories

Please tell us your experiences with cancer prevention or care in South Australia.

Please include within your story whether you are:

  • experiencing or have experienced cancer 
  • supporting or have supported someone with cancer 
  • a health professional 
  • a researcher
  • other.

Your story will help us to understand the experiences of people in South Australia with cancer and those who are caring for or supporting those with cancer.  

Your story will be published on this site and available to be read by the public.  Please remember to remain respectful and do not include any information that could compromise the privacy of yourself or other.

Thank you for taking the time to share your story with us and contribute to the SA Cancer Plan.  We will read what you have said and incorporate the themes from everything we hear into a report that will be released publicly.  The information in the report will inform the development of the SA Cancer Plan.  

Please keep a watch on the YourSAy website for regular updates and future engagement opportunities on the SA Cancer Plan. 

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

  • Share Breast Cancer on Facebook Share Breast Cancer on Twitter Share Breast Cancer on Linkedin Email Breast Cancer link

    Breast Cancer

    by Penelope , over 1 year ago

    My story began with a GP visit (not my regular GP) I had a rash on my R Breast…’oh that’s eczema’ and was given cortisone cream, which did clear it up. No further investigations..Several months later, i went back to the GP still concerned about my Breast..’ oh well you’re due for a mammogram, so go and get that done … no examination..I waited 3 weeks for my results, having been told that if there was a concern you would get an early phone call.. no phone call, just a letter telling me to contact Breast Screen for further... Continue reading

  • Share Cancer- My Story on Facebook Share Cancer- My Story on Twitter Share Cancer- My Story on Linkedin Email Cancer- My Story link

    Cancer- My Story

    by Charles Nash, over 1 year ago

    January 2019 I began experiencing light-headedness, fatigue, night sweats, laboured breathing and a swollen face.

    At the time I was 31 years of age, and a full time commercial painter. I put my symptoms down to being low in iron as I am vegetarian, and being overworked. I had consulted my GP for various tests regarding my swelling, assuming that I may had been allergic to something. All tests returned no answers and I had been encouraged to seek a second opinion with another doctor.


    This doctor ordered an ultra sound on my neck, and during this examination, there was... Continue reading

  • Share Beating brain cancer after being diagnosed with a bleak outlook on Facebook Share Beating brain cancer after being diagnosed with a bleak outlook on Twitter Share Beating brain cancer after being diagnosed with a bleak outlook on Linkedin Email Beating brain cancer after being diagnosed with a bleak outlook link

    Beating brain cancer after being diagnosed with a bleak outlook

    by Chelsea Fullers Fight , over 1 year ago

    In 2013 I was diagnosed with an inoperable primary brain tumour (oligodendroglioma Stage 2), a tumour so big I had no idea it was even in there, doctors were stunned. I was a healthy 27 year old with nowhere to turn as there were not many options other than to go home and "Live out your life"

    I had recently gotten married and started a family having two young children (1&3) other than friends and family I received no other support. This was the Hardest time of my life but so grateful that I was able to turn to the... Continue reading

  • Share Strong Family History on Facebook Share Strong Family History on Twitter Share Strong Family History on Linkedin Email Strong Family History link

    Strong Family History

    by HeatherP, over 1 year ago

    My mum had breast cancer for 5 years, and lost her battle in 1987. She was diagnosed age 40. I was determined that I would use healthcare to minimize my own risk. In collaboration with my GP I had my first screen when I was thirty, which I maintained for 2-3 years. I missed a few years, then covid, and was rescreened in June 2022 through Breastscreen SA. I am appreciate and thankful for this service, and being able to access screening early.

    My first diagnosis of early breast cancer was in June 2022. My surgeon could not feel a... Continue reading

  • Share Cancer is not just for the older generation! on Facebook Share Cancer is not just for the older generation! on Twitter Share Cancer is not just for the older generation! on Linkedin Email Cancer is not just for the older generation! link

    Cancer is not just for the older generation!

    by The BEAT Movement , over 1 year ago

    In September 2021, I was around 30 weeks pregnant with my second son Eli when I felt a lump in my right breast. I raised the concern with my midwife and every single health care professional I came in contact with after that. Each and every one of them told me it was a blocked milk duct and to just put heat on there and massage it.


    When Eli was born, I continued to raise my concerns about the lump but was again told it was a blocked milk duct. At his 6 week check up, I raised the concern... Continue reading

  • Share Stage 3 bowel cancer diagnosis at 33 years of age on Facebook Share Stage 3 bowel cancer diagnosis at 33 years of age on Twitter Share Stage 3 bowel cancer diagnosis at 33 years of age on Linkedin Email Stage 3 bowel cancer diagnosis at 33 years of age link

    Stage 3 bowel cancer diagnosis at 33 years of age

    by ReneeJ, over 1 year ago

    At the age of 33 I was diagnosed with Stage 3 bowel cancer, a diagnosis that literally never crossed my mind. Bowel cancer will effect 15,000 people per year in Australia, including ~1000 people under the age of 50. Due to my age, gender and pre-conceived ideas about bowel cancer patients, my diagnosis was not a simple process and required multiple GP/hospital visits where I presented with severe abdominal pain, uncontrollable vomiting and weigh-loss. I was asked by one particular ER Dr "are you sure it's not just period pain?", "You COULD stay for tests, but its going to be... Continue reading

  • Share Phil, You are cancer free... 5 weeks later my Dad was gone on Facebook Share Phil, You are cancer free... 5 weeks later my Dad was gone on Twitter Share Phil, You are cancer free... 5 weeks later my Dad was gone on Linkedin Email Phil, You are cancer free... 5 weeks later my Dad was gone link

    Phil, You are cancer free... 5 weeks later my Dad was gone

    by Nataliegriffiths, over 1 year ago

    My father was diagnosed with an incredibly small cancer 3mm in his top left lung. We were told by specialist that he didn't have any other cancer in his entire body and with surgery/removal on the 4th June, he would be able to live his life- cancer free. Surgery removal took place, blood test and we were told he was "cancer free" to go home and live his life.

    3 weeks later he was still in incredible amount of pain, we took him to the hospital for tests. Doctors assured us it was an infection and that he would be... Continue reading

  • Share My stomach cancer on Facebook Share My stomach cancer on Twitter Share My stomach cancer on Linkedin Email My stomach cancer link

    My stomach cancer

    by Tony Eyles, over 1 year ago
    Late in 2021 both my wife and I were diagnosed with cancers, only days apart.

    My wife with Lung cancer and myself with inoperable stomach cancer.

    My wife had one lung lobe removed and is now in remission.

    For myself an Endoscopy and Laparoscopy investigation revealed secondary cancer on the stomach lining specifically the diaphragm. I was put onto chemotherapy and Imnothearaphy immediately after a port was installed in December. For myself 2 successive CT scans show the cancer does not appear to have spread further and some areas have shrunk.

    I'm only 65.

  • Share 8 years and counting on Facebook Share 8 years and counting on Twitter Share 8 years and counting on Linkedin Email 8 years and counting link

    8 years and counting

    by Cecilia, over 1 year ago

    I was first diagnosed with a brain tumour (oligodendroglioma grade 2) in September 2014. I had surgery and innumerable MRIs following. In April 2020 I was diagnosed with a more malignant tumour (anaplastic astrocytoma grade 3) and then had a year of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Throughout my illness I have learned so much about cancer research, treatment and the hope for a 'cure', though I realise that the proportion of the human race with any brain tumour is a very small number. I understand this means that the key to research, funding and a 'cure' - money - is... Continue reading