Increasing access to the Home Battery Scheme for rental properties

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Consultation has concluded

Consultation Process

Now closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 20 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. Below is a record of the consultation.

We want your views on how to help renters and landlords access the Home Battery Scheme.

What’s being decided?

We want to increase access to the Home Battery Scheme subsidy and low interest loans to people living in privately rented houses as they generally don’t have the opportunity to benefit from this technology.

With approval from their landlord, tenants can already access the Home Battery Scheme and have the battery system and new or

Consultation Process

Now closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 20 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. Below is a record of the consultation.

We want your views on how to help renters and landlords access the Home Battery Scheme.

What’s being decided?

We want to increase access to the Home Battery Scheme subsidy and low interest loans to people living in privately rented houses as they generally don’t have the opportunity to benefit from this technology.

With approval from their landlord, tenants can already access the Home Battery Scheme and have the battery system and new or additional solar installed. However, as at December 2019, of the 5,000 batteries installed (or pending installation) under the scheme, only 17 are for properties occupied by renters. This tells us that more needs to be done to support tenants and landlords take up on the initiative.

We are seeking your feedback on how a structured program that decreases risks to landlords and removes barriers to tenants, would incentivise the installation of more solar and battery systems.

Get involved

To have your say, read the Issues paper Providing greater access to home battery technology in the private rental market and consider the following questions:

Question 1: What is the greatest barrier that is preventing tenants from accessing solar and battery systems? How can this be overcome?

Question 2: In your view, would a structured program or scheme, that increases benefits to landlords, incentivise landlords and tenants to install more solar and battery systems? If not, why not?

Question 3: In your opinion, would retail offers that provide fixed billing for solar and battery systems, as well as energy usage, drive greater uptake of energy efficiency technology? If not, please provide further information.

Question 4: Would a statutory scheme provide certainty to landlords and facilitate a greater uptake of energy efficiency technology in rental properties? What would it need to take into account? How could such a scheme best be established in the South Australian regulatory context?

Provide your feedback by:

  • Emailing your responses to the above questions to CET@sa.gov.au

  • Posting your written responses to:

Clean Energy Transition
Department for Energy and Mining
GPO Box 320
ADELAIDE SA 5000

How can your input influence the project?

All feedback will be considered to help shape changes in the industry, to improve the uptake of battery and solar systems in the private rental market.

What are the next steps?

Once all feedback has been considered, we will assess the introduction of any new or improved regulations in line with the South Australian Government’s Better Regulation Handbook.

We will ensure that any new regulations strike an appropriate balance between protecting the community and minimising compliance costs on businesses and individuals.

Contact details

For more information contact:

Clean Energy Transition team
T: (08) 8429 2721
E: cet@sa.gov.au

Closing date: 5pm, Friday 31 January 2020





Background


Now closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 20 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. Find out more about the consultation process.

The Government is committed to delivering more affordable, reliable and secure energy supplies in a transitioning national energy market. Part of this is responsibility is to unlock the value and opportunities offered by South Australia’s energy resources.

The Home Battery Scheme is a government scheme in operation since October 2018. The scheme supports the installation of 40,000 home battery systems on South Australian households by providing them with subsidies for a battery and low interest loans for additional or new solar as well as the balance of the battery. The subsidy is available to all South Australians connected to the grid and varies depending on the size of the battery, with the cap currently at $6,000 per battery.

As part of this transition to new energy supplies, it’s important to explore ways in which the benefits of lower energy prices can reach all South Australians. This includes helping customers in private rental properties who typically don’t have the opportunity to benefit from the bill savings that a solar and battery system can provide.

Around 22% of homes in South Australia are private rental properties. Typically the majority of tenants in these properties have not been able to access energy efficiency technology such as solar photovoltaic (PV) generation and home battery systems, so have not been able to get the benefits of lower bills and energy independence.

As at December 2019, of the 5,000 batteries already installed (or pending installation) under the scheme, 17 are for properties occupied by renters. This tells us that more needs to be done to help tenant and landlord take up of home battery systems.

You can help us make the Home Battery Scheme more accessible to renters and landlords by getting involved and having your say.

Consultation has concluded
  • Get involved

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    by BTT_Migration_Team,

    Now closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 20 December 2019 to 31 January 2020. Find out more about the consultation process.

    To have your say, read the Issues paper Providing greater access to home battery technology in the private rental market and consider the following questions:

    Question 1: What is the greatest barrier that is preventing tenants from accessing solar and battery systems? How can this be overcome?

    Question 2: In your view, would a structured program or scheme, that increases benefits to landlords, incentivise landlords and tenants to install more solar and battery systems? If not, why not?

    Question 3: In your opinion, would retail offers that provide fixed billing for solar and battery systems, as well as energy usage, drive greater uptake of energy efficiency technology? If not, please provide further information.

    Question 4: Would a statutory scheme provide certainty to landlords and facilitate a greater uptake of energy efficiency technology in rental properties? What would it need to take into account? How could such a scheme best be established in the South Australian regulatory context?

    Provide your feedback by:

    • Emailing your responses to the above questions to CET@sa.gov.au

    • Posting your written responses to:

    Clean Energy Transition
    Department for Energy and Mining
    GPO Box 320
    ADELAIDE SA 5000