Draft South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Have your say on plans to secure the long-term recovery and conservation of Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagles in South Australia.

What's being decided?

The endangered Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle are a distinctive part of the South Australian coastline and a plan outlining strategies and actions to ensure the long-term conservation and recovery of these iconic species in our state is being developed.

We want your feedback on the Draft South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle, particularly the objectives and recovery actions including how to:

  • secure the population by protecting all known breeding territories
  • increase the number of breeding pairs within their historical habitat
  • identify and address critical knowledge gaps.

All feedback received will be considered in developing the final plan, which will be submitted to the Minister for Environment and Water for approval.

Background

The Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle are distinctive, large birds of prey that live mostly along our coast. They are emblematic, top-order predators and as such indicate the health of coastal environments in our state.

Both species are endangered in South Australia due to the low numbers of breeding pairs, and the number of occupied territories has declined over the past 50 years.

The Draft South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle was prepared by the Recovery Team for these species, which includes a range of experts from the community and government.

The plan focuses on:

  • identifying threats of greatest risk to the species
  • how best to manage these threats to maintain the current breeding population
  • where additional targeted management can be undertaken to increase breeding success and the number of pairs.

Conserving and recovering Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle populations in South Australia will involve a wide range of stakeholders, including local communities, landscape boards, First Nations, local governments, local environmental groups, fishers and surfers, just to name a few.

Anyone who enjoys coastal activities in the birds’ range can play a role in their conservation.

Get involved

Finalising this recovery plan is a key step towards securing the future for these iconic raptors. You can contribute by commenting on the draft plan and considering how you could support recovery and conservation actions.

Find out more:

Have your say by:

What are the next steps?

The Recovery Team will carefully consider your feedback in finalising the South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle and will share a summary on this site.

The final plan will be released in 2022 and will be available on this page.

Have your say on plans to secure the long-term recovery and conservation of Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagles in South Australia.

What's being decided?

The endangered Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle are a distinctive part of the South Australian coastline and a plan outlining strategies and actions to ensure the long-term conservation and recovery of these iconic species in our state is being developed.

We want your feedback on the Draft South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle, particularly the objectives and recovery actions including how to:

  • secure the population by protecting all known breeding territories
  • increase the number of breeding pairs within their historical habitat
  • identify and address critical knowledge gaps.

All feedback received will be considered in developing the final plan, which will be submitted to the Minister for Environment and Water for approval.

Background

The Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle are distinctive, large birds of prey that live mostly along our coast. They are emblematic, top-order predators and as such indicate the health of coastal environments in our state.

Both species are endangered in South Australia due to the low numbers of breeding pairs, and the number of occupied territories has declined over the past 50 years.

The Draft South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle was prepared by the Recovery Team for these species, which includes a range of experts from the community and government.

The plan focuses on:

  • identifying threats of greatest risk to the species
  • how best to manage these threats to maintain the current breeding population
  • where additional targeted management can be undertaken to increase breeding success and the number of pairs.

Conserving and recovering Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle populations in South Australia will involve a wide range of stakeholders, including local communities, landscape boards, First Nations, local governments, local environmental groups, fishers and surfers, just to name a few.

Anyone who enjoys coastal activities in the birds’ range can play a role in their conservation.

Get involved

Finalising this recovery plan is a key step towards securing the future for these iconic raptors. You can contribute by commenting on the draft plan and considering how you could support recovery and conservation actions.

Find out more:

Have your say by:

What are the next steps?

The Recovery Team will carefully consider your feedback in finalising the South Australian Recovery Plan for Eastern Osprey and White-bellied Sea Eagle and will share a summary on this site.

The final plan will be released in 2022 and will be available on this page.

Discussions: All (1) Open (1)
Page last updated: 21 December 2021, 15:28