We're changing NRM in South Australia

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Consultation has concluded

Consultation Process


UPDATE: Below is a record of what appeared on YourSAy during the open consultation process from 24 July 2018 - 15 October 2018.


We want to see communities and people central to managing the natural resources of their region. This involves significant reforms and your input is critical.

What is being decided?

The South Australian Government has committed to a range of reforms to the natural resources management system. These include:

Consultation Process


UPDATE: Below is a record of what appeared on YourSAy during the open consultation process from 24 July 2018 - 15 October 2018.


We want to see communities and people central to managing the natural resources of their region. This involves significant reforms and your input is critical.

What is being decided?

The South Australian Government has committed to a range of reforms to the natural resources management system. These include:

  • Replacing the Natural Resources Management Act with the proposed Landscape South Australia Act
  • Creating a simpler, flexible and accessible system for managing natural resources, with decentralised decision-making
  • Putting people at the heart of managing our natural resources, recognising that those who work and live on the land are well placed to manage and sustain it
  • Creating nine landscape Boards and Green Adelaide to replace existing NRM Boards
  • Making soil quality, pest plant and animal control and water management major priorities
  • Capping annual land and water levy rises at a rate set by an independent body or according to the Consumer Price Index (CPI)
  • Establishing a Grassroots Grants program, a $2 million statewide annual fund for volunteer, community and not-for-profit groups to access

A discussion paper provides an overview of the reforms, the benefits it will bring and the key areas where community input is sought to shape those reforms.

Get involved

Check out the Discussion Paper, the Executive Summary and the Frequently Asked Questions and provide your feedback on how you believe natural resources should be managed by:

You can provide your feedback based on the questions in the discussion paper or you can comment on any other aspects of natural resources management that are important to you.

Aboriginal engagement

The government wants to hear how it can better recognise and promote Aboriginal peoples’ land, water, economic and cultural interests. We invite Aboriginal people to attend a community forum to provide their input. Find out more here.

Contact details

For general inquiries or to request direct contact with an Aboriginal Engagement Officer, please email the Landscape Reform team at landscapereform@sa.gov.au or call us on 812 4 4772 during business hours of 9am - 5pm, Monday to Friday.

Please note that feedback cannot be accepted by phone.

How will your input be used?

Your feedback will help inform the development of a Landscape South Australia Bill that reflects community needs and expectations.

You can keep informed about the reform through regular updates on this website or you can sign up here to receive notification of updates.

Closing date: Monday 15 October 2018


Background


While the NRM Act brought positive change and benefits, the passage of time and gradual centralisation mean the current system of natural resources management is not delivering what it should.

There are parts of the NRM Act that have worked well and should be retained and other parts that are over-complicated and have impeded good, local, on-the-ground management that should be removed, amended or simplified.

This is a unique opportunity to refresh and reset natural resources management within our state.

Guiding principles for reform

Five core principles encapsulate our vision for reform of the natural resources management system:

  • Decentralised decision making – putting the focus on local issues and priorities that matter to regional communities.
  • A simple and accessible system – creating a transparent, flexible and responsive system that will allow people to get the job done more easily.
  • Community and landowners at the centre – recognising that people who live and work on the land are well placed to build enduring partnerships and make decisions about caring for our natural resources.
  • Back to basics – undertaking grassroots environmental projects that tackle soil and water management, weeds and pest animal control.
  • A whole of landscape approach – taking an integrated approach that complements grassroots programs with strategic projects to achieve restoration of entire landscapes.

Do you want to learn more?

Find out more about the proposed reforms to improve how we manage natural resources:

Consultation has concluded
  • Outcome

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    The South Australian Government has a clear commitment to reforming natural resources management – focussing on a back to basics approach that gets the fundamentals right and delivers for local communities across our state.

    Following three months of extensive engagement across the state, a consultation report including all community feedback (that was not marked confidential) is now available.

    The report (pdf 123 MB) covers 250 written submissions, 26 community forums, 23 engagement sessions and discussions gathered over the past few months outlining key areas of feedback. A report summary and appendices are also available to download here.

    Some key aspects of feedback included:

    • the need to ensure that our landscapes are climate resilient and support our regional communities, primary producers and economies to thrive
    • regional communities want a system of managing natural resources that not only focuses on the basics of delivering effective water management, pest, plant and animal control, soil and land management
    • new conservation and nature based sector sought greater support for ecological communities with thriving biodiversity
    • regional communities wanting less ‘red tape’ and a greater voice in decision-making, with local Board membership reflecting their communities
    • overwhelming support to distribute some levy funding from the metropolitan area to regional South Australia
    • strong support across all areas of the state for the continuation of nature education and nature stewardship
    • a high level of enthusiasm for the creation of Green Adelaide and its vision for establishing Adelaide as a world renowned water sensitive urban city that’s ecologically vibrant and climate resilient.

    The Landscape SA Bill is expected to be introduced into Parliament in early 2019.

    Sign up here to stay informed and receive updates.

  • About the Reform

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    The proposed reforms provide for the ecologically sustainable management of the state’s natural resource base to achieve:

    Vibrant biodiversity: Healthy native species and ecosystems that are able to adapt and persist in the face of change.

    Sustainable economy: Prosperous businesses now and in the future, able to adapt as the economy and primary industries transform over time.

    Resilient communities: Capable local people and groups leading stewardship of their natural environment, contributing to strong social networks that can cope with changing environments.

    Key components of the reform

    Landscape Boards

    • Create nine Landscape Boards to replace existing NRM Boards.
    • The Boards will have seven members with three members elected by the community and four members, including the Chair, appointed by the Minister for Environment and Water.
    • The Boards will be responsible for setting strategy and approving programs for natural resources management and will be at arm’s length from government.
    • Landscape Boards will establish a five-year Landscape Plan for their region, identifying up to five priorities to be achieved by the plan during that time. The plans will be simple and publicly accessible.
    • Landscape Boards will have a general manager who will employ and direct staff that will deliver environmental management programs on behalf of the Board.
    • Landscape Boards will be required to partner with the private, local government, non-government sector and the Australian government to deliver environmental programs to create jobs and drive investment in local communities.

    Levies

    • Cap annual land and water levy rises at a rate set by an independent body or according to the Consumer Price Index (CPI).
    • Establish the Grassroots Grants program, a $2 million statewide annual fund (in addition to existing NRM grants programs) for volunteer, community and not-for-profit groups to access.
    • Levies (land and water) collected in a region will be spent in the region, except for a portion for priority landscape scale or cross-boundary projects, and services.
    • Provide a publicly available budget outlining how levies will be spent in the forthcoming financial year and an end-of-financial-year report.
    • Continue to collect land levies via council rates.

    Legislation

    • The legislative reform will focus on practical programs and on-ground works delivered within existing resources.
    • The NRM Act will be repealed and replaced with the Landscape South Australia Act.
    • The new Act will identify soil quality, pest plant and animal control and water management as major priorities.

    Green Adelaide

    • Green Adelaide will be created to deliver natural resources management functions in metropolitan Adelaide.
    • It will work towards Adelaide being the most ecologically vibrant city in the world.
    • Green Adelaide will have an expert Board appointed by the Minister for Environment and Water.
    • Green Adelaide will focus on seven key priorities: coastal management, urban rivers and wetlands, water sensitive urban design, green streets and flourishing parklands, fauna in the city, controlling pest plants and animals and nature education.
    • Green Adelaide will co-administer the $2 million Grassroots Grants fund.

    Get involved and have your say on how natural resources should be managed.

  • Community forums and workshops

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    Independent facilitators have been appointed to work with the Minister to ensure a broad range of views are canvassed and the engagement process is fair, balanced and equitable.

    20 community forums will be held across the state during August and September, providing an opportunity to find out more about the proposed reforms and to ask questions:

    Find the event closest to you and book your attendance in the link provided.

    Aboriginal Engagement

    It is important that First Nation’s knowledge and interests in their traditional lands and waters are recognised and promoted to drive benefits for Aboriginal people and practical improvements in the health of Country.

    The government wants to hear how it can better recognise and promote Aboriginal peoples’ land, water, economic and cultural interests.

    Strengthening First Nations voices in the NRM system will open space for strong and productive partnerships, for integrating Aboriginal knowledge, and for supporting Aboriginal people to take a leading role in managing natural resources.

    Aboriginal people are invited to attend a community forum from 6 August until 20 September. They can also provide their input online here.

    Alternatively, local Aboriginal Engagement Officers are also available. Call 8124 4772 or email landscapereform@sa.gov.au to request contact with an officer.

  • Update

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  • Update

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