Colonel Light Gardens - Heritage Guidelines

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Consultation has concluded

Consultation Process


Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 11 December 2020 to 1 February 2021. Below is a record of the engagement process.

Have your say on changes to heritage guidelines for Colonel Light Gardens that aim to protect this garden suburb’s significant heritage.

What is being decided?

Colonel Light Gardens is Australia’s most complete example of an early 1900s garden suburb and is a designated State Heritage Area. The existing heritage guidelines for Colonel Light Gardens encourage appropriate development, compatible with the heritage values of the area.

In response to the introduction of a new

Consultation Process


Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 11 December 2020 to 1 February 2021. Below is a record of the engagement process.

Have your say on changes to heritage guidelines for Colonel Light Gardens that aim to protect this garden suburb’s significant heritage.

What is being decided?

Colonel Light Gardens is Australia’s most complete example of an early 1900s garden suburb and is a designated State Heritage Area. The existing heritage guidelines for Colonel Light Gardens encourage appropriate development, compatible with the heritage values of the area.

In response to the introduction of a new planning system for South Australia, we are reviewing and updating the guidelines for the suburb to ensure they:

The key changes to the draft guidelines include:

  • updating the structure and terminology of the document, to mirror the structure of the new State Heritage Area Overlay of the Code
  • a detailed description of the heritage features of the garden suburb, for design guideline advice
  • sections describing the ‘heritage characteristics’ of Colonel Light Gardens, to highlight the heritage elements of the suburb
  • new sections on the management of the heritage values of public spaces and reserves within the garden suburb
  • revised guidance policy relating to materials, fencing and services such as solar panels, reflecting current practices.

The updated guidelines will affect how development is undertaken in Colonel Light Gardens. Residents and others with an interest in the State Heritage Area, are invited to provide feedback.

Get involved

To have your say, read the:

Provide your feedback by:

Please note: Your feedback may be made publicly available unless you indicate on your submission that you wish for this to remain confidential. Surveys do not identify individuals however text responses may be made publically available. Any responses that are made on a confidential basis may still be subject to access under Freedom of Information laws.

How can your input influence the decision?

Your feedback will be considered in finalising the Heritage Guidelines (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area) and help ensure development in the area protects the identified heritage values.

What are the next steps?

The final draft, including feedback, will be submitted to the Chief Executive, Department for Environment and Water for approval.

Once approved, the guidelines will be published on this site and the Department for Environment and Water website.

The updated guidelines will be used:

  • by Heritage SA in assessing development applications that may impact on state heritage values
  • to provide advice to property owners planning to restore, alter or develop their property
  • by Mitcham Council in assessing applications in the Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area, where relevant.

Contact

DEW.StateHeritageDA@sa.gov.au

Phone (08) 8124 4922 Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm

Closing date: 5pm, Monday 1 February 2021


Background


Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 11 December 2020 to 1 February 2021. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement process.

The below Conservation Management Plans and Garden Suburb Planning Principles highlight the values that have been used to create the draft updated Heritage Guidelines (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area).

Colonel Light Gardens Conservation Management Plans (1989 & 2005)

There are two Colonel Light Gardens Conservation Management Plans, which:

  • document the historical development of the suburb
  • analyse the significance of the garden suburb movement
  • identify the heritage values of the suburb
  • provide conservation policies of the public and private spaces through the suburb.

The plans are a key tool to understand and manage the heritage values of Colonel Light Gardens, prepared based on best-practice ‘Burra Charter’ principles – the guiding charter for Australian heritage management.

While the heritage values and conservation policies outlined in these plans are reflected in the Heritage Guidelines (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area), these plans are separate documents and do not have a statutory role in planning decisions.

Garden Suburb Planning Principles

The Colonel Light Gardens Historical Society Inc. has compiled the following Garden Suburb Planning Principles (principles) to capture the essence of Colonel Light Gardens. These are:

  • A park-like environment
  • A distinct community with its own identity
  • An abundance of well distributed open space
  • Strict land use zoning for housing and commercial areas
  • Roads designed according to their planned level of use
  • Street corners rounded for improved traffic visibility
  • Housing designed for private detached homes for single families with ample front side and rear yards

The Colonel Light Gardens Statement of Significance reflects these principles and is the legislative point of truth for the heritage values of the Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area.

The draft updated guidelines now include a list of the heritage features of the suburb, to explain how the buildings and parks illustrate the heritage significance of the suburb. These mirror the Garden Suburb Planning Principles, but provide more detail and reflect the context of the Planning and Design Code as follows:

Garden Suburb Planning Principles

Draft updated guidelines

A park-like environment

“(b) A planned mix of wide and narrow streets with a dominant, established park-like landscaped character, with extensive reserve planting based on the original design intent (street tree species and layout, lawn, footpath bitumen, vertical kerbing and simple pedestrian cross overs). Laneways without kerbs and paving also of note.”

“(e) The formality, planned purpose and abundance of open public reserves, formal street gardens and pocket parks – including shared parks to the rear of properties in the north of the suburb.”

A distinct community with its own identity

Not reflected in the draft guidelines as not a planning/ design matter.

An abundance of well distributed open space

“(e) The formality, planned purpose and abundance of open public reserves, formal street gardens and pocket parks – including shared parks to the rear of properties in the north of the suburb.”

Strict land use zoning for housing and commercial areas

“(d) Suburb zones initially planned by function and location, including residential, commercial and educational, religious and recreational precincts.”

Roads designed according to their planned level of use

“(a) Hierarchy of straight and curved symmetrical roadways of a variety of lengths, rounded street corners, and rear laneways - which discourage through traffic and designed to create unfolding sequences of attractive, green and varied spaces and terminal vistas.

(b) A planned mix of wide and narrow streets with a dominant, established park-like landscaped character, with extensive reserve planting based on the original design intent (street tree species and layout, lawn, footpath bitumen, vertical kerbing and simple pedestrian cross overs). Laneways without kerbs and paving also of note”

Street corners rounded for improved traffic visibility

“(a) Hierarchy of straight and curved symmetrical roadways of a variety of lengths, rounded street corners, and rear laneways - which discourage through traffic and designed to create unfolding sequences of attractive, green and varied spaces and terminal vistas.”

Housing designed for private detached homes for single families with ample front side and rear yards

“(f) Low density residential development with dwellings sited on generous allotments with ample front, side and rear yards. Single detached, dwellings of similar scale, design, and provenance, with consistent front and side setbacks – 1920-30s in period. Heritage features include:…”


Consultation has concluded
  • Engagement report and finalised Standards released

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    In response to the introduction of a new planning system for South Australia, Heritage South Australia reviewed and updated the existing guidelines for development in Colonel Light Gardens in readiness for consultation with the community.

    You may have been involved in our engagement process, which occurred from Friday 11 December to Monday 1 February 2021, where the community was asked for their input into how the draft updated guidelines for development could be amended to strengthen and protect heritage values in Colonel Light Gardens. This was an extensive engagement process that included local landowners, residents, various stakeholders and the broader South Australian community.

    You can find out more about the engagement process, what we heard and how we responded in the Updated Heritage Standards (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area) Engagement Report.

    Following the analysis of all the feedback gathered, the new Heritage Standards (Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area) were finalised. The new Standards were published on 28 April 2021 and are now being used by Heritage South Australia to inform decisions about development in the area.

    Visit our website to find out more about State Heritage Areas or if you have any questions, contact Heritage South Australia at DEW.StateHeritageDA@sa.gov.au.

  • SA Planning reforms

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    by BTT_Migration_Team,
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    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 11 December 2020 to 1 February 2021. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of the engagement process.

    The South Australian planning system is undergoing significant reform, with the introduction of the Planning Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 (and Regulations) (Act) and a single ‘rule’ book – the Planning and Design Code (the Code) – which will replace the 68 development plans across the State. Reforms relating to outback and rural areas have already been implemented, with reforms to urban areas to become operational in 2021.

    You can view more information on the planning reforms section of the PlanSA website.

    The planning reforms strengthen the protections for State Heritage Areas and State Heritage Places by:

    • introducing a NEW State Heritage Area Overlay, incorporating the boundaries of the existing 17 State Heritage Areas (SHA) in South Australia, to protect and manage the heritage values of these areas. The State Heritage Area Overlay ensures that changes to, and development within a SHA, are managed in a way that maintains the area’s heritage values. Importantly, the policies in State Heritage Area Overlay take precedence over any applicable Zone and General policies in the Code, and the control over demolition is maintained. Development in the State Heritage Area Overlay that may impact on the heritage values must be referred to the Minister for Heritage for direction (see below).
    • elevating the role of the Minister responsible for the Heritage Places Act 1993 (Minister for Environment and Heritage or delegate) in planning decisions affecting State Heritage Places or within State Heritage Areas to have a power of ‘Direction’. Previously the Minister was only empowered to provide advice.
    • formalising the role of Statements of Significance for State Heritage Areas and Heritage Guidelines for SHAs within the planning system. The State Heritage Area Overlay will link to:
      • the Statement of Heritage Significance for each SHA – these statements set out what is important within the area and are included in the South Australian Heritage Register. It will also inform the matters to be considered by the Minister when providing a ‘Direction’ on development proposals.
      • the Heritage Guidelines for SHAs – these guidelines provide location-specific guidance to the Minister and property owners on how development can be undertaken to ensure heritage values are protected. These guidelines will be published in accordance with the Act, granting them a statutory role in the development assessment process.

    In light of the Act and proposed Code, we have begun the task of reviewing and updating the heritage guidelines for all 17 SHAs to ensure they are fit for purpose, consistent with the terminology used in the Code and reflect each area's Statement of Significance. Consultation on other draft updated heritage guidelines will occur in a staged manner.

    The draft updated guidelines also incorporate the Statement of Heritage Significance in order to consolidate the heritage values in the one document. This Statement of Significance is already entered into the South Australian Heritage Register and feedback is not sought on this part of the guidelines as it remains unchanged.

    PlanSA have put together a fact sheet that explains how the Colonel Light Gardens State Heritage Area will be protected through the Code.

    The approved guidelines will be used to guide the development of private land and the public realm in Colonel Light Gardens when the proposed Code commences in 2021.

    Development Process

    Current process


    Proposed process