Community Climate Conversations

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Consultation has concluded. Thanks for your contributions.

Join the biggest community conversation on climate change in Australia!

What's being decided?

This is your opportunity to engage in conversations to help shape how South Australia transitions to a clean, green and net zero greenhouse emissions future.

Background

The Conservation Council and South Australians for Climate Action are hosting an independent statewide community conversation on climate change. The results will assist in planning our states’ transition to net zero.

This Community Conversation has been kick started by a group of 50 independently selected South Australians who are broadly representative of our community in terms of age, gender and location. The representatives met earlier this year to identify key emissions reduction activities to help get the conversation started. These ideas have been incorporated in a Conversation Guide.

The project is sponsored by the Department for Environment and Water.

Get Involved

“We have already engaged with businesses and industries on how we reduce our emissions, and, through the Community Climate Conversations, the community has the opportunity to join that conversation. I would strongly encourage everyone to get involved.” - Deputy Premier and Minister for the Environment and Water, Susan Close

Getting involved is easy!

  1. Get a few friends, colleagues or your community group together,
  2. Discuss the questions together and
  3. Upload the notes from your conversation to the online feedback form.

Anyone can host a conversation or join a conversation on climate.

You can also leave us your comments or questions in our Questions tool.

Keen to learn more?

You can find the Conversation Guide, information about how to host and the links to the online feedback forms on the website of independent engagement consultancy democracyco.


What are the next steps?

In December, all the feedback will be independently analysed and provided in a detailed report to the Minister for Environment and Water, and to government more broadly.

The diagram below shows the steps in the engagement process.



Join the biggest community conversation on climate change in Australia!

What's being decided?

This is your opportunity to engage in conversations to help shape how South Australia transitions to a clean, green and net zero greenhouse emissions future.

Background

The Conservation Council and South Australians for Climate Action are hosting an independent statewide community conversation on climate change. The results will assist in planning our states’ transition to net zero.

This Community Conversation has been kick started by a group of 50 independently selected South Australians who are broadly representative of our community in terms of age, gender and location. The representatives met earlier this year to identify key emissions reduction activities to help get the conversation started. These ideas have been incorporated in a Conversation Guide.

The project is sponsored by the Department for Environment and Water.

Get Involved

“We have already engaged with businesses and industries on how we reduce our emissions, and, through the Community Climate Conversations, the community has the opportunity to join that conversation. I would strongly encourage everyone to get involved.” - Deputy Premier and Minister for the Environment and Water, Susan Close

Getting involved is easy!

  1. Get a few friends, colleagues or your community group together,
  2. Discuss the questions together and
  3. Upload the notes from your conversation to the online feedback form.

Anyone can host a conversation or join a conversation on climate.

You can also leave us your comments or questions in our Questions tool.

Keen to learn more?

You can find the Conversation Guide, information about how to host and the links to the online feedback forms on the website of independent engagement consultancy democracyco.


What are the next steps?

In December, all the feedback will be independently analysed and provided in a detailed report to the Minister for Environment and Water, and to government more broadly.

The diagram below shows the steps in the engagement process.



Consultation has concluded. Thanks for your contributions.

Please add your comment or question below and we'll get back to you directly.

Thanks for your interest.

  • Share How much would it cost per person per year to convert to 100% green energy & how many jobs would be lost? on Facebook Share How much would it cost per person per year to convert to 100% green energy & how many jobs would be lost? on Twitter Share How much would it cost per person per year to convert to 100% green energy & how many jobs would be lost? on Linkedin Email How much would it cost per person per year to convert to 100% green energy & how many jobs would be lost? link

    How much would it cost per person per year to convert to 100% green energy & how many jobs would be lost?

    Bronwyn Caldwell asked 7 months ago

    Dear Bronwyn,

    Thanks for your question.  We were not able to locate specific data on costs per person or jobs lost for South Australia.  There will be both costs and opportunities involved with the transition to renewable energy.   

    A recent CEDA report indicates that when researchers have modelled emissions reduction relative to a business-as-usual base case, most forecasts predict only a small effect on total employment from the energy transition across Australia.  You can read more at: CEDA - Clean Energy Transition: how will it affect employment?

    The Clean Energy Council(CEC) notes in their “Skilling the Energy Transition” report 2022, that the energy sector currently employs around 30,000 people across large-scale renewable energy construction, operation and maintenance and small-scale rooftop solar PV design and installation. In the same report the CEC notes that if all the associated renewable energy generation projects proceed in Australia, an additional 50,000 jobs will be created.  To ensure that a suitably skilled workforce is developed, the Powering Australia program has proposed investment of $96 million to support 10,000 New Energy Apprenticeships, and $9.6 million in a New Energy Skills Program.  The “Skilling the energy transition” report can be found here: CEC_Skilling-the-Energy-Transition-2022.pdf (cleanenergycouncil.org.au)

    Further details of the Powering Australia program can be found here: Powering Australia | energy.gov.au

    In February of 2023 the Australian Industry Energy Transitions Initiative released a report that explores address the challenges associated with decarbonising the emissions-intensive industry sector. The report found that while the transition is complex there is also an opportunity to ensure Australia is able to navigate the challenges and ensure the nation is well-positioned for global competitiveness in a decarbonising global economy. You can read this report here: PowerPoint Presentation (arena.gov.au)

    Recently, the SA government released “South Australia’s Paper on the Energy Transition” to encourage conversation and generate ideas relating to the challenges impacting South Australia’s use of energy, both current and emerging, and the opportunities successfully navigating these challenges represent to the state, as we transition to a net-zero emissions energy future. Public consultation on the green paper closed in August and a comprehensive White Paper is being prepared that will set out where we are now, where we need to be and how we will get there as we transition to a net-zero emissions future in being developed. You can read more here: South Australia's Green Paper on the energy transition | Energy & Mining (energymining.sa.gov.au)

    Kind regards

    YourSAy Team

  • Share Why is citizen solar switched off and curtailed while corporate solar continues? on Facebook Share Why is citizen solar switched off and curtailed while corporate solar continues? on Twitter Share Why is citizen solar switched off and curtailed while corporate solar continues? on Linkedin Email Why is citizen solar switched off and curtailed while corporate solar continues? link

    Why is citizen solar switched off and curtailed while corporate solar continues?

    Sarge asked 6 months ago

    Dear Sarge,

    South Australia’s power system is part of a national grid referred to as the National Electricity Market (NEM) which is managed by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO). 

    There are times when South Australia is not connected i.e. becomes ‘islanded’ from the NEM and the power system in South Australia needs to be managed with care, and to allow for risks which could normally be mitigated by our connection to the NEM. 

    As an example, the storm of 12 November 2022 destroyed an electricity transmission tower which formed part of our connection to the NEM - the Heywood Interconnector - which resulted in South Australia becoming ‘islanded’.

    Following this event, AEMO advised that there was a risk that if a large generator were to suddenly disconnect in the possible event of another system fault this could also result in the uncontrolled disconnection of many rooftop solar systems in proximity to that generator. This further fault could potentially lead to further and cascading failures within the power system. This is a risk that AEMO has previously examined in detail in several public reports.

    Following the events of November 2022, and acting on AEMO’s instruction, SA Power Networks (SAPN), the electricity distributor in South Australia, used three agreed methods in the following order to disconnect rooftop solar systems to manage this risk.

    First, very large solar generators connected to the SAPN distribution network were turned off. All State Government departments were also instructed to turn off solar systems on public buildings.

    Some large solar farms located in regional South Australia continued to operate, as their distance from large generators of concern meant that their continued operation did not cause the same risk to power system security as generation within metropolitan areas.

    It is important to note that solar farms are subject to market forces so at times when solar curtailment is used in South Australia, wholesale market prices are typically negative which disincentivises solar farm operators from operating. Where they are required to be turned off for reasons of system security, this is done by AEMO through its direction powers.

    Second, rooftop solar systems installed after September 2020, which can be remotely controlled under new technical requirements were disconnected. Any owner of a solar system which can export power to the grid installed after September 2020, is required to nominate a relevant agent who can if directed, disconnect that system. SAPN issued instructions to all relevant agents operating in South Australia to disconnect solar under their control.

    Finally and as a last resort, SAPN also activated Enhanced Voltage Management (EVM). SAPN normally regulates voltage levels of their network to maximise the amount of energy that rooftop solar systems can generate. When using EVM, SA Power Networks increases or decreases the voltage levels at key distribution zone substations (within safe limits). This results in solar inverters activating their own disconnection devices while the grid voltage remains higher than normal. Solar Inverters are required to be able to do this safely under Australian Standards, and to safely return to normal operation once the grid voltage is restored to the standard range.

    Kind regards

    YourSAy Team

  • Share Why did you speak to industry and businesses BEFORE communities? Is this a democracy or a corpocracy? on Facebook Share Why did you speak to industry and businesses BEFORE communities? Is this a democracy or a corpocracy? on Twitter Share Why did you speak to industry and businesses BEFORE communities? Is this a democracy or a corpocracy? on Linkedin Email Why did you speak to industry and businesses BEFORE communities? Is this a democracy or a corpocracy? link

    Why did you speak to industry and businesses BEFORE communities? Is this a democracy or a corpocracy?

    Sarge asked 6 months ago

    Hi Sarge - there was not particular reason why. It was just how things worked out. DIfficult to factor everything in at the same time. Regards Emma 

  • Share Hello, we are planning to hold a Climate Conversation with an agricultural industry group, who only have availability on 30 November. Will we be able to submit feedback if it is a couple of days past the 30th? Thank you on Facebook Share Hello, we are planning to hold a Climate Conversation with an agricultural industry group, who only have availability on 30 November. Will we be able to submit feedback if it is a couple of days past the 30th? Thank you on Twitter Share Hello, we are planning to hold a Climate Conversation with an agricultural industry group, who only have availability on 30 November. Will we be able to submit feedback if it is a couple of days past the 30th? Thank you on Linkedin Email Hello, we are planning to hold a Climate Conversation with an agricultural industry group, who only have availability on 30 November. Will we be able to submit feedback if it is a couple of days past the 30th? Thank you link

    Hello, we are planning to hold a Climate Conversation with an agricultural industry group, who only have availability on 30 November. Will we be able to submit feedback if it is a couple of days past the 30th? Thank you

    Nicole Bennett2 asked 6 months ago

    Thats absolutely fine Nicole. We look forward to having the group's feedback - we can add it in to our analysis as soon as you can get it to us. Best of luck with your conversation. Let us know if we can provide any assistance. 

  • Share Here's a comment ... Firstly, you need to be up front and honest and accept the fact that since there are NO economically commercial viable ways to "carbon capture from the atmosphere" "Net Zero" means "Absolute Zero" and that is a whole new ball game. (https://dailysceptic.org/2023/04/13/no-flying-by-2050-is-the-world-finally-waking-up-to-what-net-zero-really-means/) According to the best estimates Net Zero is about to cost Australia three trillion dollars(?) it doesn't have. I would have thought that before this money you dont have is spent, your economists might actually make some attempt to calculate what adaption would cost - since global Net Zero is going to fail anyway (China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia, ... ) so you are going to have to spend that money anyway! The three trillion dollars would be better put to one side for then rather than pissing it against the wall on a strategy that cannot but fail! Cheers on Facebook Share Here's a comment ... Firstly, you need to be up front and honest and accept the fact that since there are NO economically commercial viable ways to "carbon capture from the atmosphere" "Net Zero" means "Absolute Zero" and that is a whole new ball game. (https://dailysceptic.org/2023/04/13/no-flying-by-2050-is-the-world-finally-waking-up-to-what-net-zero-really-means/) According to the best estimates Net Zero is about to cost Australia three trillion dollars(?) it doesn't have. I would have thought that before this money you dont have is spent, your economists might actually make some attempt to calculate what adaption would cost - since global Net Zero is going to fail anyway (China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia, ... ) so you are going to have to spend that money anyway! The three trillion dollars would be better put to one side for then rather than pissing it against the wall on a strategy that cannot but fail! Cheers on Twitter Share Here's a comment ... Firstly, you need to be up front and honest and accept the fact that since there are NO economically commercial viable ways to "carbon capture from the atmosphere" "Net Zero" means "Absolute Zero" and that is a whole new ball game. (https://dailysceptic.org/2023/04/13/no-flying-by-2050-is-the-world-finally-waking-up-to-what-net-zero-really-means/) According to the best estimates Net Zero is about to cost Australia three trillion dollars(?) it doesn't have. I would have thought that before this money you dont have is spent, your economists might actually make some attempt to calculate what adaption would cost - since global Net Zero is going to fail anyway (China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia, ... ) so you are going to have to spend that money anyway! The three trillion dollars would be better put to one side for then rather than pissing it against the wall on a strategy that cannot but fail! Cheers on Linkedin Email Here's a comment ... Firstly, you need to be up front and honest and accept the fact that since there are NO economically commercial viable ways to "carbon capture from the atmosphere" "Net Zero" means "Absolute Zero" and that is a whole new ball game. (https://dailysceptic.org/2023/04/13/no-flying-by-2050-is-the-world-finally-waking-up-to-what-net-zero-really-means/) According to the best estimates Net Zero is about to cost Australia three trillion dollars(?) it doesn't have. I would have thought that before this money you dont have is spent, your economists might actually make some attempt to calculate what adaption would cost - since global Net Zero is going to fail anyway (China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia, ... ) so you are going to have to spend that money anyway! The three trillion dollars would be better put to one side for then rather than pissing it against the wall on a strategy that cannot but fail! Cheers link

    Here's a comment ... Firstly, you need to be up front and honest and accept the fact that since there are NO economically commercial viable ways to "carbon capture from the atmosphere" "Net Zero" means "Absolute Zero" and that is a whole new ball game. (https://dailysceptic.org/2023/04/13/no-flying-by-2050-is-the-world-finally-waking-up-to-what-net-zero-really-means/) According to the best estimates Net Zero is about to cost Australia three trillion dollars(?) it doesn't have. I would have thought that before this money you dont have is spent, your economists might actually make some attempt to calculate what adaption would cost - since global Net Zero is going to fail anyway (China, India, Pakistan, Indonesia, South America, Africa, South East Asia, ... ) so you are going to have to spend that money anyway! The three trillion dollars would be better put to one side for then rather than pissing it against the wall on a strategy that cannot but fail! Cheers

    Another Alistair asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for your feedback and input