Green Adelaide Regional Landscape Plan

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Consultation has concluded

Consultation Process Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 15 March to 12 April 2021. Below is a record of the engagement.

Please tell us your thoughts on our draft plan to create a cooler, greener, wilder and climate-resilient metropolitan Adelaide.

What is being decided?

We invite your feedback on the Green Adelaide draft Regional Landscape Plan (the Plan) - a pathway to a cooler, greener, wilder, and climate-resilient Adelaide.

The Plan is a 5-year strategic plan to guide our work, as well as leadership and partnerships with:

The Plan focuses on 7 priorities, included in our Plan Summary, which are set out by the Landscape South Australia Act 2019. It includes:

  • 4 iconic project ideas
  • key focus areas (actions and activities) and outcomes for each of the seven priorities
  • our role and investment principles
  • how we will measure its progress.

Get involved

Read the draft Regional Landscape Plan (2021-2026) and the Plan Summary.

If you are from an organisation or group, we've developed a set of Discussion Questions to help guide your feedback in regards to partnerships and the Plan.

Have your say by:

  • joining the online discussion
  • completing the online survey
  • attending a community forum (in person or streamed)
  • attending an online information session
  • emailing us a written submission

How can your input influence the decision?

Your feedback will inform the final Plan, which sets its strategic direction for the next 5 years.

We will use your feedback to inform our annual business plan for 2021-2022 which will:

  • support the delivery of the Regional Landscape Plan
  • outline the budget, staffing and levy arrangements over the 2021-22 financial year.

Annual business plans also identify projects and programs to be funded each year to meet the strategic direction of the Regional Landscape Plan.

What are the next steps?

We will consider and incorporate your feedback into a consultation report, which will be available on this site.

The final Regional Landscape Plan (2021-2026) and Annual Business Plan (2021-2022) will be finalised by June 2021. It will be available on the Green Adelaide website and this website.

Contact

For general enquiries:

Closing date: 5pm, Tuesday, 20 April 2021


Background

Green Adelaide is one of 9 landscape boards. It was created on 1 July 2020 under the Landscape South Australia Act 2019, following a range of reforms to the natural resource management (NRM) system.

Green Adelaide’s region spans 17 metropolitan councils (from Gawler River in the north to Sellicks Beach in the south) and about a third of Gulf St Vincent. You can view the Green Adelaide region boundary and local council areas on this interactive map.

For the first time, metropolitan Adelaide has a government organisation sharply focused on making progress towards a climate-resilient and ecologically vibrant city stretching from the hills to the sea.

The Act requires us to prepare a 5-year Regional Landscape Plan to deliver practical outcomes across the following 7 key priorities:

Coastal management

We will help conserve and restore Adelaide’s unique coastline to benefit our way of life, our economy and provide vital habitat for native plants and animals.

Water resources and wetlands

We will protect, enhance and restore Adelaide’s water resources (our rivers, wetlands, groundwater or underground water and lakes) to help preserve these essential ecosystems and the wildlife that call them home.

Green streets and flourishing parklands

We will increase tree canopy cover and green spaces to create cooler urban areas that encourage biodiversity and improve community health and wellbeing.

Biodiversity and water sensitive urban design

We will build industry and community capacity to design cooler, greener and nature-friendly developments and infrastructure.

Controlling pest plants and animals

We will help coordinate the management of invasive pests to support an Adelaide that is rich with healthy biodiversity.

Nature education

We will grow nature and sustainability education in Adelaide to support children and adults to connect with the environment.

Fauna, flora and ecosystem health in the urban environment

We will create more urban spaces for plants and animals to thrive in which in turn provides people a better quality of life.

The draft Regional Landscape Plan was developed based on feedback from:

  • the NRM system reform consultation during 2018
  • stakeholder* consultation during mid 2019
  • stakeholder* consultation during November and December 2020.

*Stakeholders included representatives from local councils, government agencies, the environmental sector, industry peak bodies and Warpulai Kumangka (Green Adelaide’s Kaurna Advisory Group).

Green Adelaide is primarily funded by the Landscape Levy, which is collected through local councils.

The levy is paid by all ratepayers across the state to fund their local landscape boards to protect and enhance the environment.

The levy recognises that all residents and landowners have important roles and responsibilities around enjoying, managing and protecting our landscapes.

Everyone across the region is both an investor and a beneficiary.


Consultation Process Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 15 March to 12 April 2021. Below is a record of the engagement.

Please tell us your thoughts on our draft plan to create a cooler, greener, wilder and climate-resilient metropolitan Adelaide.

What is being decided?

We invite your feedback on the Green Adelaide draft Regional Landscape Plan (the Plan) - a pathway to a cooler, greener, wilder, and climate-resilient Adelaide.

The Plan is a 5-year strategic plan to guide our work, as well as leadership and partnerships with:

The Plan focuses on 7 priorities, included in our Plan Summary, which are set out by the Landscape South Australia Act 2019. It includes:

  • 4 iconic project ideas
  • key focus areas (actions and activities) and outcomes for each of the seven priorities
  • our role and investment principles
  • how we will measure its progress.

Get involved

Read the draft Regional Landscape Plan (2021-2026) and the Plan Summary.

If you are from an organisation or group, we've developed a set of Discussion Questions to help guide your feedback in regards to partnerships and the Plan.

Have your say by:

  • joining the online discussion
  • completing the online survey
  • attending a community forum (in person or streamed)
  • attending an online information session
  • emailing us a written submission

How can your input influence the decision?

Your feedback will inform the final Plan, which sets its strategic direction for the next 5 years.

We will use your feedback to inform our annual business plan for 2021-2022 which will:

  • support the delivery of the Regional Landscape Plan
  • outline the budget, staffing and levy arrangements over the 2021-22 financial year.

Annual business plans also identify projects and programs to be funded each year to meet the strategic direction of the Regional Landscape Plan.

What are the next steps?

We will consider and incorporate your feedback into a consultation report, which will be available on this site.

The final Regional Landscape Plan (2021-2026) and Annual Business Plan (2021-2022) will be finalised by June 2021. It will be available on the Green Adelaide website and this website.

Contact

For general enquiries:

Closing date: 5pm, Tuesday, 20 April 2021


Background

Green Adelaide is one of 9 landscape boards. It was created on 1 July 2020 under the Landscape South Australia Act 2019, following a range of reforms to the natural resource management (NRM) system.

Green Adelaide’s region spans 17 metropolitan councils (from Gawler River in the north to Sellicks Beach in the south) and about a third of Gulf St Vincent. You can view the Green Adelaide region boundary and local council areas on this interactive map.

For the first time, metropolitan Adelaide has a government organisation sharply focused on making progress towards a climate-resilient and ecologically vibrant city stretching from the hills to the sea.

The Act requires us to prepare a 5-year Regional Landscape Plan to deliver practical outcomes across the following 7 key priorities:

Coastal management

We will help conserve and restore Adelaide’s unique coastline to benefit our way of life, our economy and provide vital habitat for native plants and animals.

Water resources and wetlands

We will protect, enhance and restore Adelaide’s water resources (our rivers, wetlands, groundwater or underground water and lakes) to help preserve these essential ecosystems and the wildlife that call them home.

Green streets and flourishing parklands

We will increase tree canopy cover and green spaces to create cooler urban areas that encourage biodiversity and improve community health and wellbeing.

Biodiversity and water sensitive urban design

We will build industry and community capacity to design cooler, greener and nature-friendly developments and infrastructure.

Controlling pest plants and animals

We will help coordinate the management of invasive pests to support an Adelaide that is rich with healthy biodiversity.

Nature education

We will grow nature and sustainability education in Adelaide to support children and adults to connect with the environment.

Fauna, flora and ecosystem health in the urban environment

We will create more urban spaces for plants and animals to thrive in which in turn provides people a better quality of life.

The draft Regional Landscape Plan was developed based on feedback from:

  • the NRM system reform consultation during 2018
  • stakeholder* consultation during mid 2019
  • stakeholder* consultation during November and December 2020.

*Stakeholders included representatives from local councils, government agencies, the environmental sector, industry peak bodies and Warpulai Kumangka (Green Adelaide’s Kaurna Advisory Group).

Green Adelaide is primarily funded by the Landscape Levy, which is collected through local councils.

The levy is paid by all ratepayers across the state to fund their local landscape boards to protect and enhance the environment.

The levy recognises that all residents and landowners have important roles and responsibilities around enjoying, managing and protecting our landscapes.

Everyone across the region is both an investor and a beneficiary.


Consultation has concluded
  • Green Adelaide Regional Landscape Plan (2021 - 26) released

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    From 10 March to 20 April 2021 community and stakeholder feedback was sought on Green Adelaide’s draft Regional Landscape Plan.

    Over 700 people were actively involved in our engagement process that comprised a community forum, targeted stakeholder workshops, conversations with young people, online survey and information session and social media campaigns. You can find out more about the engagement process, what we heard and how we responded in our Consultation Report.

    Following the analysis of all the feedback gathered, Green’s Adelaide Regional Landscape Plan (2021-26) has been finalised and is now available on Green Adelaide’s website.

    Feedback on potential project ideas has also been considered as part of the preparation of Green Adelaide’s Annual Business Plan (2021-22), which allocates funding to implement programs and projects across the Green Adelaide region.

    You can read a summary of Green Adelaide’s plan and overview of the projects to be delivered this financial year here.

    Alternatively, visit our website to find out more about our plan or if you have any questions, contact Green Adelaide at DEW.greenadelaide@sa.gov.au.

  • Plan Summary

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    Plan Summary

    Green Adelaide will deliver practical outcomes across 7 key priorities.

    Below is a summary of the priorities, and how the draft Regional Landscape Plan addresses these.

    The Summary of Green Adelaide’s Draft Regional Landscape Plan PDF is available for download.

    7 Key Priorities overview

    1. Coastal management

    Goal

    Coastal and marine habitat biodiversity is restored and conserved

    Focus areas

    • Facilitate a partnerships approach to adaptive coast and marine management
    • Partner and invest in the conservation and restoration of coastal and marine environments
    • Conserve and restore Blue Carbon habitats

    Outcomes

    • Coordinated conservation and restoration of natural coast and marine environments
    • Improved biodiversity outcomes, including habitats and species of key conservation concern
    • Enhanced climate resilience and adaptation and increased environmental and social benefits

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Reef condition improves
    • Seagrass extent and condition improves
    • Coastal habitat condition of significant sites improves
    • Populations of species of conservation concern increase or remain stable


    2. Water resources and wetlands

    Goal

    Water resources deliver environmental, economic, social and cultural benefits

    Focus areas

    • Protect, enhance, and restore water resources and water-dependent ecosystems through partnerships and on-ground delivery
    • Build water knowledge and management capacity of practitioners and community
    • Simple and enabling water management policy frameworks

    Outcomes

    • Biodiverse blue and green spaces that enhance the quality and sustainability of water resources
    • Effective management of watercourses by landholders (public and private)
    • Best practice, sustainable water management

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Aquatic ecosystem condition improves
    • Fish abundance and diversity increases
    • Surface water (flow and quality) improves


    3. Biodiversity sensitive urban design (BSUD) & water sensitive urban design (WSUD)

    Goal

    Community and industry capacity to design cooler, biodiverse and greener urban landscapes is improved

    Focus areas

    • Facilitate and incentivise best practice BSUD and WSUD in new developments, major transport corridors, public open spaces and local streetscapes
    • Coordinate and partner on research and other tools to address barriers to implementation and identify opportunities for innovation
    • Build community, council and industry knowledge, motivation and capacity to deliver best practice outcomes

    Outcomes

    • Best practice BSUD and WSUD outcomes in both the private and public realm
    • Implementation barriers are solved and opportunities harnessed
    • Improved WSUD and BSUD implementation success by community, councils and industry

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Uptake of WSUD and BSUD in new development increases
    • Uptake of WSUD and BSUD in council projects increases


    4. Green streets and flourishing parklands

    Goal

    The extent and quality of urban green cover is increased

    Focus areas

    • G1 Drive coordinated, accelerated greening of streetscapes and public spaces
    • Encourage the protection of trees and incentivise greater greening of private land through the new planning system and other levers
    • Identify priority locations for improved urban greening and define what success looks like in different contexts

    Outcomes

    • Improved regional coordination to achieve more resilient, water smart and sustainable urban greening outcomes
    • More new infill housing keep mature trees and plant more than the minimum landscaping requirements
    • Strategic, high quality greening reflective of local context and need

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Tree canopy and green cover increases
    • Reduction of localised heat islands


    5. Fauna, flora and ecosystem health in the urban environment

    Goal

    Urban habitats for native flora and fauna are restored, conserved or expanded

    Focus areas

    • Facilitate and invest in improving knowledge about species and ecological systems and their management
    • Invest and partner in protecting, improving and/or creating terrestrial habitats
    • Identify and support the implementation of recovery actions for threatened plants and animals

    Outcomes

    • Flora and fauna conservation management practices are improved
    • Terrestrial habitat condition improves at sites with significant investment
    • Quality (or extent) of habitat is enhanced and threatened species’ population decline is halted (or reversed) at targeted sites

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Terrestrial habitat condition improves for specific sites
    • Populations of species of conservation concern increase or remain stable


    6. Controlling pest plants and animals

    Goal

    The impacts of pests and overabundant native species are well managed

    Focus areas

    • Facilitate research and provide expert advice to support effective management of overabundant native species and pest plants and animals
    • Work with partners to conduct surveillance to detect incursion of new and emerging pest plants and animals.
    • Establish partnerships to develop and implement innovative pest and overabundant species management strategies and educational programs

    Outcomes

    • Knowledge and delivery of effective management strategies improves
    • Identification and control of new and emerging pest animals and plants before they are widely established
    • Mitigated threat to native species and the community and protection of key biodiversity assets and primary production

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Number of emerging weeds (populations/sites) controlled, reduced or eradicated
    • Number of pest incursions identified and eradicated


    7. Nature education

    Goal

    Community members value, connect with and are stewards for nature

    Focus areas

    • Raise awareness and build capacity about Aboriginal cultural knowledge, values and lore
    • Facilitate cross-sector nature education community campaigns to reach diverse audiences
    • Enable a movement of diverse nature ‘stewards’ through school/educational partnerships, community learning and development, nature play, citizen science and sustainability activities

    Outcomes

    • Traditional practices are embedded in community-led projects and programs
    • Increased community awareness, understanding and inspiration to connect with and care for nature
    • Increased environmental values and broad participation in nature stewardship and sustainability activities across diverse communities

    Example Outcome Indicators (5 years)

    • Community environmental values, knowledge and behaviours are improved
    • Community knowledge, recognition and attitudes towards Kaurna culture are increased


    Potential Iconic Projects (across all priorities)

    Specific projects for each priority are to be determined.

    • Rewilding our rivers and coastlines – opportunities exist at:
      • Lower Field River Valley
      • Dry Creek
      • Sturt River
      • Aldinga Washpool
      • Mutton Cove
      • delivering Breakout Creek Stage 3
    • Greening our streets and backyards – bringing together multiple partners to drive an ambitious and coordinated approach to greening our city
    • Making Adelaide a National Park City – lead the process to creating a National Park City
    • Reigniting Culture – led by Warpulai Kumangka and includes a partnered Cultural Burns Program

    Example Annual Indicators (across all projects)

    • Levy dollars invested
    • Additional funding leveraged
    • Number of project partners
    • Number of grants
    • Spread of investment socially and spatially
    • Media/social media reach
    • Number of research trials funded
    • Number of projects led by, or with input from, Kaurna
    • Kaurna employment (Green Adelaide projects/programs)
    • Hectares of habitat maintained/restored
    • Number of volunteers/citizen science events
    • Number of trees and other vegetation planted
    • Hectares of pest plant and animal control
    • Number of capacity-building events