State Disability Inclusion Plan

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Consultation has concluded

Consultation Process

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

Let us know your thoughts on the draft content for South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019-2023 (State Plan), which includes proposed visions, themes and actions.

What is being decided?

In March and April this year, we asked your views about what is important for an inclusive and accessible community for South Australians with disability.

The Consultation Report summarises your feedback about access, inclusion and

Consultation Process

Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

Let us know your thoughts on the draft content for South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019-2023 (State Plan), which includes proposed visions, themes and actions.

What is being decided?

In March and April this year, we asked your views about what is important for an inclusive and accessible community for South Australians with disability.

The Consultation Report summarises your feedback about access, inclusion and ideas for change in South Australia and has been considered to develop the first draft of the State Plan. An Easy Read version of the report is also available for your review.

The State Plan will set whole-of-government priorities and strategies for achieving a more inclusive South Australia in line with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It will set out the vision and principles to be implemented over the next four years in South Australia.

We are now seeking your feedback on the draft State Plan content which outlines the visions, priorities, actions and four central themes:

  • Leading and collaborating in decision-making
  • Inclusive communities for all
  • Accessible communities
  • Learning and employment

You can learn more about the development of the State Plan in the Background tab.

Get Involved

Read the draft State Plan or the Easy Read Version and provide your input:

Department of Human Services, GPO Box 292, Adelaide, SA, 5001

How will your input be used?

Your input will help shape the final State Plan and set the direction for disability access and inclusion for the next four years in South Australia.

The final State Plan will be published on 31 October 2019, and will be reported on annually and reviewed at least every four years.

Contact

If you want to find out more about this consultation please contact the Department of Human Services on (08) 8207 0245.

Closing date: 5pm, 30 August 2019.




Background


Now Closed

This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

South Australians had their say about our first State Plan during March and April this year. Over 380 people took part in consultations across metropolitan and regional South Australia through YourSAy, community forums, written and telephone submissions and face to face interviews.

The consultation was an exciting time. We heard from people living with disability, their families and carers, people that work in the sector, and other community members. We heard that community attitudes, employment, education, and built environments are important to you. You can read more about the consultation in the Consultation Report tab or the Easy Read Version tab.

Based on what you told us matters the most, our first plan will focus on the following areas:

  1. Leading and collaborating in decision-making
  2. Inclusive communities for all
  3. Accessible communities
  4. Learning and employment

The State Plan has an overarching vision, and each theme has its own vision and individual ‘I’ statements.

We are committed to getting the basics right in our first State Plan and will continue to listen to what the community has to tell us. The consultations with the following priority groups are continuing and will be added to the State Plan within two years, or as the consultations are completed:

  • Women
  • Children
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
  • Culturally and linguistically diverse people.

We are also working with other State Government departments and local councils to develop further actions for change and will update the State Plan when this work is complete.

There is considerable commitment across State Government and local councils to increase the accessibility and inclusion of our communities for people living with disability. A significant number of agencies already have Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) in place, and many have programs or policies in place to support this commitment. Some examples of existing good practice include supported decision-making resources, various access and inclusion committees, disability awareness training across various State Government departments, improved access and accessibility features throughout some of South Australia’s National Parks, and the employment of Policy and Access Inclusion Officers within some local councils.

The first State Plan recognises the existing work occurring across the State and seeks to ensure the effort is built upon and maximised. We want to standardise initiatives and build the capacity of agencies to implement the highest standard of access and inclusion practice across all that they do.

It is also important to note that the South Australian Government continues to work closely with the Commonwealth Government to resolve any gaps identified in service delivery and responsibility, as the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is completed.

The National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 was the first time that all governments across Australia committed to a unified, national approach to improving the lives of people with disability, their families and carers. A new disability strategy for beyond 2020 is currently being developed by the Commonwealth and will assist South Australia in our future planning.

Government action alone is not enough – the whole community is responsible for improving access and inclusion for people living with disability. It is essential that the State Plan is developed alongside the community so that the whole of South Australia takes ownership and responsibility for bringing it to life.

The State Plan will also inform DAIPs, which will be produced by all State authorities (as defined by the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA)), and authorities will be provided with the detailed consultation undertaken by the Department of Human Services to make sure their plans consider what is important to the community.

The State Plan must be reviewed every four years, but we have committed to reviewing the first plan within the first two years. We will continue to consult and engage with people living with disability, their families and carers, service providers and the broader community to inform inclusion and access in South Australia.

Consultation has concluded
  • Outcome

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Thank you to all those who provided feedback on the draft content of the State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019-2023. Community consultation was invaluable and contributed over 1000 ideas for the State Disability Inclusion Plan.

    On 1 November 2019, the Premier, Steven Marshall, and the Minister for Human Services, the Honourable Michelle Lensink MLC, launched Inclusive SA, South Australia’s first Disability Inclusion Plan.

    Inclusive SA will bring State Government agencies and local councils together to reduce the barriers faced by people living with disability. It sets out priorities and actions for the next four years under the following themes:

    • Inclusive communities for all
    • Leadership and collaboration
    • Accessible communities
    • Learning and employment

    State Disability Inclusion Plan

    Download the State Disability Inclusion Plan content on a PDF printable version

    Download the State Disability Inclusion Plan content on a PDF (Easy Read Version) printable version

    Download the State Disability Inclusion Plan content on a Word printable version

    More information can be found online at inclusive.sa.gov.au.

  • What you said

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

    Read the draft State Plan or the Easy Read Version and provide your input:

    Department of Human Services, GPO Box 292, Adelaide, SA, 5001

  • Consultation Report

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

    South Australia’s First Disability Inclusion Plan 2019–2023

    Community Consultation: Summary Report

    Supported by Department of Human Services (DHS) and JFA Purple Orange

    July 2019

    Download the Consultation Summary Report (screen reader version) on a PDF printable version

    Download the Consultation Summary Report on a Word printable version

    Following the introduction of the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA), the South Australian Government is developing its first State Disability Inclusion Plan (‘the State Plan’). The development of the first State Plan is an important step towards building a truly inclusive South Australia. The State Plan will shape the government’s vision for the next four years, guiding the work of State Government and local councils. The development of the State Plan is supported by a Disability Inclusion Act Reference Group, comprising members from State Government agencies, local councils and other state bodies.

    JFA Purple Orange – an independent social policy organisation that works to enhance the life chances of people living with increased vulnerability – was engaged by the Department of Human Services (DHS) to lead a six-week community consultation to inform the development of the State Plan.

    DHS developed a discussion paper to inform the consultation, which was organised around four themes:

    • liveable communities
    • participation in decision-making
    • creating opportunities
    • fairness, safety and equality.

    Discussions were based on these themes. People provided feedback in a variety of ways, including via community forums, individual interviews, an online discussion forum, emails, hard- copy written submissions and phone calls.

    Consultation participants gave input on a wide range of topics affecting the lives of people living with disability including:

    • community attitudes
    • social inclusion
    • the built environment
    • participation in decision-making
    • employment
    • education and training
    • service provision
    • the accessibility and availability of information
    • transport
    • housing
    • law and justice
    • advocacy
    • health
    • safety.

    Participants considered the specific situations of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, women and children. Further consultation with these priority groups is being separately undertaken by DHS.

    Participants commented on various positive initiatives and developments. Some noted, for example, that attitudes towards disability are slowly improving.

    Others observed that the built environment is gradually becoming more accessible, particularly for people who use wheelchairs. Developments such as accessible playgrounds and beaches were described as highly beneficial.

    While some progress and positive initiatives were identified throughout the consultation, participants identified many areas where further action is needed to ensure that South Australia becomes a truly accessible and inclusive place to live for all. In this respect, over a thousand ideas were generated for the State Government and local councils to consider.

    A key message to emerge throughout the consultation was the need to normalise disability, reduce barriers and stigma and encourage more understanding of people living with disability. As one participant said, if we ‘redefine attitudes to disability… the rest will follow.’

    Overall, participants were optimistic about the potential of the State Plan and Disability Access Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) to have a meaningful impact on the lives of people living with disability.

    Note: The issues and ideas presented in this report bring a valuable perspective. However, they do not necessarily represent the views of all South Australians who live with disability or are otherwise engaged with the disability community.

    People living with disability guide the way

    JFA Purple Orange worked with a co-design group comprising people representing different experiences of disability, including intellectual disability, physical disability and acquired brain injury, as well as the parent of a person living with disability. The co-design group provided valuable input on the discussion paper and the design of the community forums. It will continue to meet to inform the development of the State Plan, also working alongside DHS.

    Who was consulted and how?

    Overall, 384 people took part in the consultation:

    • 126 people participated in one of five community forums in Salisbury, Noarlunga, Adelaide, Mount Gambier and Whyalla
    • 152 people took part in a service provider consultation forum in Adelaide
    • 68 people made a written submission
    • 19 people were interviewed by JFA Purple Orange
    • 17 people commented on the YourSAy website
    • 2 people provided input over the phone

    In total, input was received from over 130 people living with disability. Other people taking part in the consultation included family members and carers, people working in the disability sector, local and state government representatives, community members and researchers.

    Community forum participants

    • Lives with disability: 28%
    • Works in the sector: 27%
    • Other: 24%
    • Family member: 21%

    “The State Government should lead the way in access and inclusion, setting a positive example for the rest of the community and the nation.”

    Key messages

    An overarching theme to emerge throughout the consultation is that people living with disability aspire to lead meaningful, fulfilling lives. They want to:

    • be treated with respect and dignity
    • find meaning in their lives
    • make their own decisions
    • be actively involved in their communities
    • live somewhere that feels like home
    • be able to get places
    • receive an education
    • work
    • feel safe
    • have fun
    • make friends
    • be connected and informed
    • understand their rights
    • have access to the services they need.

    Disability access and inclusion needs to be addressed holistically, as the issues that people face often overlap and inter-relate.

    Consultation participants encouraged the State Government and local councils to introduce strong accountability mechanisms and outcome measures under the State Plan and DAIPs, to ensure that progress is achieved and measured. It was suggested that a longitudinal evaluation could be conducted at local council level and state-wide, to measure the impact of the State Plan and DAIPs over time.

    “Everyone has different abilities. Make sure everyone has the opportunity to use their abilities.”

    How accessible and inclusive is your community?

    Consultation participants were asked to rate how accessible and inclusive their community is.

    Accessibility of community (n=127)

    • Not accessible at all: 6%
    • Not very accessible: 54%
    • Accessible: 32%
    • Pretty accessible: 6%
    • Very or highly accessible: 2%

    Inclusiveness of community (n=121)

    • Not inclusive at all: 6%
    • Not very inclusive: 55%
    • Inclusive: 29%
    • Pretty inclusive: 9%
    • Very or highly inclusive: 1%

    What’s working well?

    Consultation participants noted that a range of improvements are being seen:

    • Disability is becoming more accepted and attitudes are slowly improving
    • Gradual improvements are being made to the built environment, especially for people who use wheelchairs
    • Some schools and workplaces are becoming more inclusive and accessible
    • Accessible playgrounds and beaches are expanding people’s recreational choices
    • The disability rights legal framework is becoming stronger
    • The Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) has potential to bring about change
    • The State Government and local councils are starting to deliver more inclusive consultations
    • There is a growing number of audio descriptions for cultural and other events
    • People are starting to talk about mental health
    • Governments are starting to disseminate resources and information in Easy English (Easy Read).

    Biggest frustrations

    During the community forums, participants were asked to write down their one biggest disability-related frustration. A total of 109 participants took part. Some frustrations were counted under more than one theme.

    Top 10 biggest frustrations:

    • Community attitudes: 21
    • Built environment: 21
    • Social inclusion: 18
    • Service provision: 14
    • Employment: 11
    • Transport: 10
    • Housing: 10
    • Accessibility of information: 9
    • Availability of information: 9
    • Health (including mental health): 6

    Key findings

    Vision for the State Plan

    The State Plan discussion paper set out a vision of “a community that is liveable for all, where people’s voices are heard and respected, opportunities are available for all, and fairness, safety and equality are upheld.” Participants wanted the vision and framing of the State Plan to include specific mention of people living with disability, use colloquial language such as ‘having a fair go’, give everyone the opportunity to contribute to the community and describe the community as a place where everyone is valued and accepted.

    Community attitudes

    “Attitudinal changes are key to making physical changes and removing barriers.”

    According to some consultation participants, disability is becoming more accepted in the wider community and awareness is slowly increasing.

    However, people reported ongoing negative attitudes, discrimination, low recognition of the value of people living with disability and a general lack of understanding of disability. A lack of community awareness and understanding can affect various aspects of people’s lives, such as their inclusion in social events and their education and employment prospects. Some attributed this lack of awareness partly to the lack of visibility of disability within the community and government, as well as the role of the media.

    Ideas for action

    • Launch a state-wide inclusion campaign and fund positive messaging campaigns
    • Deliver far-reaching community education, training and awareness-raising about disability and inclusion, focusing on people’s strengths and contributions.

    Social inclusion

    “Fun is underrated.”

    Social inclusion was raised as a key priority. This includes involvement in sport and recreation, participation in community life, and interaction with a range of people as friends, colleagues, neighbours and in other capacities. Some programs and initiatives – such as the companion card and accessible playgrounds and beaches – are increasing people’s social participation. However, a concerning number of people living with disability said that they do not feel included in mainstream social events and activities. They described a range of barriers to social participation including transport and parking, funding for support, infrastructure and a lack of information about inclusive and accessible events, many of which are addressed in other sections throughout this report.

    Ideas for action

    • Allocate more funding to access and inclusion across government
    • Improve the accessibility of existing venues and facilities
    • Provide more inclusive, low-cost sports and recreational activities.

    The built environment

    “Riding on some footpaths in a wheelchair is like ‘cross- country’ riding.”

    The physical accessibility of the built environment has a significant impact on people’s ability to participate in social, economic and community life. Though some consultation participants reported an overall improvement in physical accessibility, especially for wheelchair-users, many remain frustrated about the number of physical access barriers they continue to face on a daily basis – from footpaths and roads, to businesses and restaurants, to public facilities and community spaces. Many stated that there are not enough ramps and accessible toilets. Some people also commented on inconsistent compliance with disability access standards and insufficient commitment to universal design.

    Ideas for action

    • Commit to universal design across government and introduce stricter compliance requirements
    • Develop stricter standards and codes for building and planning
    • Modify unsafe roads, pedestrian crossings and footpaths
    • Designate more accessible car parks and taxi ranks in suitable locations.

    Participation in decision-making

    “Saying people were part of the discussion is not sufficient. The involvement must extend into the decision-making.”

    The requirement under the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) for governments to consult was noted as a positive step, and some participants feel that the State Government and local councils are starting to deliver more inclusive consultations. Some local councils also connect with the disability community through advisory groups and committees. One of the main concerns to emerge throughout the consultation was that decisions affecting people living with disability are still too often made by people who do not have lived experience of disability. Although people living with disability are consulted more frequently than in the past, it is rare that they are directly involved in-decision making.

    Ideas for action

    • Establish a formal state government disability advisory body
    • Establish ad hoc committees/groups to advise government on particular matters
    • Ensure greater representation of people living with disability on committees, panels and other decision-making bodies
    • Provide programs and initiatives to better equip people living with disability with the skills, knowledge and information they need to lead fulfilling lives (For example,. leadership, rights and self-advocacy)
    • Commit across government to using collaborative design (‘co-design’)
    • When consulting with the community, consult at the outset of new developments; spend more time in regional areas; be flexible with respect to timing, location and methodology; and reach out to people with complex needs.

    Employment

    “Educate the community about ABILITY.”

    Some workplaces are reportedly becoming more inclusive and accessible for people living with disability. Employee assistance funding helps people to find work, but they often lose their jobs once the initial funding period has ceased. The main message stemming from employment discussions was the need to improve the attitudes and practices of employers, especially by increasing awareness about the benefits of employing people who live with disability. A general lack of work opportunities outside supported employment was commonly raised, as well as a need for better services to connect people to job opportunities, including for those who are in supported employment or finishing school.

    Ideas for action

    • Set disability employment targets or quotas in government and mainstream workplaces
    • Make government recruitment processes and workplaces accessible and inclusive
    • Provide training, materials and support to employers about working with people who live with disability, with a focus on the benefits
    • Offer more incentives for employers to recruit people living with disability
    • Support the development of volunteering and mentorship programs.

    Education and training

    “Major reforms are needed to transform culture, policies and practices across early childhood, school and tertiary education.”

    Some consultation participants felt that education providers at different levels lack sufficient understanding and awareness of disability, resulting in inadequate levels of support for students who live with disability. At school-level, some mainstream schools are reportedly taking steps to better include students living with disability, but there are still many segregated classrooms and schools. Participants emphasised a need for more systematic training about disability inclusion, both for current teachers and those in training, as well as greater funding to meet individual students’ support needs. Students at TAFE and university also reportedly need more support staff and services.

    Ideas for action

    • Deliver systematic training about disability inclusion in the education system, both for current teachers and those in training
    • Provide more support staff and services for students living with disability at school, TAFE and university
    • Improve the transition from school to employment for people living with disability, for example by providing more work experience opportunities.

    Service provision

    “There needs to be more empathy and appreciation of individual strengths and challenges when working with people with disability.”

    Access to quality services is of critical importance to people living with disability and participants recognised that some organisations in South Australia provide a high level of support. However, many expressed concern about a lack of support workers, particularly in regional areas, as well as insufficiently trained service providers. A number of people discussed the gaps that are arising between Commonwealth and State responsibilities as a result of the transition to the NDIS.

    Ideas for action

    • Provide more training to, and increase the number of, disability support workers
    • Provide more funding opportunities for community organisations to support the disability community
    • Identify, analyse and fill gaps between the responsibilities of the Commonwealth and South Australian Governments.

    Accessibility and availability of information

    “Information provision is vital to people in order for them to be safe and informed and uphold their human rights.”

    Access to information is essential for people to benefit from services and take part in community life. Consultation participants were grateful that governments are starting to disseminate resources in Easy Read versions. Overall, they felt there is limited information about available services and supports, people’s rights, and what is happening in the community. They urged agencies not to assume that all people have the resources, skills and ability to navigate websites in order to extract and input information, also noting that certain disabilities – such as deafness, blindness and intellectual or cognitive disabilities – give rise to specific needs. Another concern was the low number of Auslan interpreters in South Australia.

    Ideas for action

    • Disseminate information in a wide range of accessible formats, not just online
    • Establish a centralised information centre to provide disability-specific information to the community
    • Provide Auslan interpreters and captioning for public announcements and events
    • Subsidise the Auslan interpreting diploma and/or teach Auslan in schools.

    Transport

    “We can do stuff, we just can’t always get to places.”

    Though some progress was observed, the accessibility and availability of public transport, as well as low levels of disability awareness among transport workers, were raised as significant concerns, particularly in regional areas. People also noted an insufficient number of accessible car parks, particularly for wheelchair-users. A number of people reported that the South Australian Transport Subsidy Scheme (SATSS) worked well and expressed concern about how transport needs would be met after 2019. They explained that without access to suitable and affordable transport, people living with disability cannot easily participate in community life.

    Ideas for action

    • Ensure that all South Australians living with disability have access to sufficient funding to meet their transport needs
    • Develop a state-wide transport plan for metropolitan and regional areas
    • Improve the accessibility of public transport, including stops and interchanges
    • Introduce a voice-operated system in buses.

    “Absolutely anything and everything should include people with disabilities.”

    Housing

    “Maintain and build accessible housing. Especially to meet the needs of vulnerable people. No more segregation.”

    A number of consultation participants stated that housing-related issues should be included in the State Plan. Housing designed specifically for people living with disability was noted as making a huge difference to people’s lives. It was made clear that at present, there are not enough suitable, affordable accommodation options for people living with disability. This results in a lack of choice, long wait times and people living in inappropriate housing.

    Consultation participants also commented more broadly on the links between adequate housing and education, employment, health, wellbeing and social inclusion.

    Ideas for action

    • Upgrade State Government housing, applying universal design principles
    • Increase the availability of purpose-built accommodation and supported independent living options.

    “Think BIG! Don't limit the vision! Have measurable, meaningful actions. Be a leader in access and inclusion in Australia!”

    Law, justice and advocacy

    “Advocacy services are vital and need to be adequately staffed and funded to operate efficiently, expediently and effectively.”

    Consultation participants noted that the legal framework for the protection of the rights of people living with disability is quite strong. However, many people living with disability do not know enough about their rights and where to seek advice, and do not always receive the support they need.

    This is a particular issue for those who experience discrimination and/or have contact with the justice system. It was commonly observed throughout the consultation that advocacy services in South Australia are working well but are under-funded and under-staffed, resulting in long waiting lists.

    The need for advocacy was raised across a range of topics, including discrimination and rights protection, education, employment, health and housing.

    Ideas for action

    • Fund more legal advice and support services for people living with disability
    • Fund individual and systemic advocacy services, especially in regional areas
    • Support self-advocacy programs and peer support networks for people living with disability.

    Health (including mental health)

    “People see the physical but not the mental or emotional disability.”

    The main health-related issues raised related to health practitioners, with a number of participants commenting that overall, there is limited understanding in the profession of how to treat people living with disability, especially psychosocial disability. They noted, however, that more people are starting to talk about mental health. They observed a need for more support workers to facilitate access to health services, particularly in hospitals, as well as more advocacy services.

    Ideas for action

    • Provide more training for health care workers and students on how to work with people living with disability
    • Provide support workers and disability advocates in all hospitals
    • Invest more in mental health, including for people living with physical disability.

    Safety

    “Sometimes people living with disability have been treated like they are less. And that is what we have come to expect”

    Safety issues were mostly raised with respect to public transport, roads and footpaths, though some also highlighted the general vulnerability of people living with disability. Some of the suggested actions have been addressed elsewhere in this report, such as educating people about safety and rights and funding more advocacy services. It should be noted that the open, public way in which the community consultations were run was not necessarily conducive to people speaking out about experiences of violence, neglect, exploitation and abuse.

    Ideas for action

    • Increase police presence in the community, on public transport and at transport interchanges/stops and provide more after-hours transport options
    • Provide safer access points for accessible taxi pick up and drop off
    • Refine and implement quality safeguarding processes
    • Fully support implementation of the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability at the State Government level.

    Thank you

    Thank you to everyone who gave their input on South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan. The State Government looks forward to working together with the community to improve access and inclusion in South Australia. It is essential that the State Plan is developed and implemented alongside the community so that the whole of South Australia takes ownership and responsibility for bringing it to life.

  • Consultation Report (Easy Read)

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

    South Australia’s First Disability Inclusion Plan 2019–2023

    Community Consultation: Summary Report

    Easy Read version

    Download the Consultation Summary Report (Easy Read version) on a PDF printable version.

    Download the Consultation Summary Report (Easy Read version) on a Word printable version

    How to use this document

    Julia Farr Association Purple Orange (JFA Purple Orange) wrote this document for the South Australian Government Department of Human Services (DHS). When you see the word ‘we’, it means DHS.

    We have written this information in an easy to read way.

    We have written some words in bold. We explain what these words mean.

    There is a list of these words at the bottom of this page.

    This Easy Read document is a summary of another document.

    You can ask for help to read this document.

    A friend, family member or support person may be able to help you.

    What’s on this page?

    • About our State Disability Inclusion Plan
    • Talking to the community about our State Plan
    • How did we include people with disability?
    • Groups in our community
    • What did people say?
    • What do people with disability want?
    • Our vision for South Australia
    • Making things better
    • Thank you!
    • Word list

    About our State Disability Inclusion Plan

    In 2018, we wrote a new law – the Disability Inclusion Act 2018.

    We call it the Act.

    The Act explains how people with disability should be treated.

    After we introduced the Act, we started writing our first State Disability Inclusion Plan (our State Plan).

    Our State Plan is an important step we must take to make sure our community is:

    • inclusive
    • accessible.

    If something is inclusive, everyone can take part.

    If something is accessible, everyone can use it. This might be:

    • a place or a building
    • transport
    • a service
    • information
    • a website.

    Our State Plan talks about our goals for the next 4 years.

    Other parts of the government need to write plans too, including:

    • State Government departments
    • local councils.

    We call these plans Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIP).

    Everyone needs to help make life in our community better for people with disability.

    Talking to the community about our State Plan

    It’s important for us to talk to the community about any plans we make.

    We have already talked with the community about what we should put in our State Plan.

    People gave us more than 1,000 ideas to think about.

    384 people told us what they think should be in our State Plan.

    Over 130 of those were people with disability.

    Some of the other people we talked to were:

    • family members
    • carers
    • people who work with people with disability
    • people who work for state and local governments
    • researchers.

    How did we include people with disability?

    JFA Purple Orange helped us talk to our community.

    They helped us plan our community forums.

    These are events where we get together to talk about our ideas.

    JFA Purple Orange also brought a group of people with disability together to help them.

    The people in that group told us what they think should be in our State Plan.

    The people in the group will keep working with us on our State Plan in the future.

    Groups in our community

    There are many groups in our community who face extra barriers and challenges.

    These groups include:

    • women with disability
    • children with disability
    • people with disability from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds
    • people with disability who come from different cultures
    • people with disability who speak languages other than English at home.

    We are talking to these groups about our State Plan:

    • in different ways
    • at different times.

    What did people say?

    Some people told us that our community is not very accessible.

    Some people also told us that sometimes our community is not very inclusive.

    We heard about the issues that affect people with disability the most.

    People don’t understand what life is like for people with disability.

    The places people with disability need to go, and the ways they get there, are not always accessible.

    People with disability are not always included in the fun things other people get to do.

    People with disability find it hard to get the things they need, such as:

    • services
    • transport
    • information.

    It’s hard for people with disability to find work and earn money.

    What do people with disability want?

    People with disability told us what they want.

    People with disability want to:

    • be treated with respect and dignity
    • make their own decisions
    • live in a place that feels like home
    • learn and get the education they want
    • work and earn money
    • feel safe
    • have fun and make friends
    • get the information they need
    • know what their rights are
    • find and use the services they need.

    Our vision for South Australia

    Our vision is what we want our state to be in the future.

    We want our state to be a place where everyone:

    • is treated fairly
    • is treated with respect
    • is safe
    • is treated equally
    • has the same opportunities.

    What did people say about our vision?

    People said we should:

    • talk about people with disability in our vision
    • give everyone a chance to share their ideas about what is in our State Plan
    • use more everyday language that people can understand.

    Making things better

    We are doing a good job in some areas.

    But other areas need more work.

    The community told us their ideas about what we can do to make things better.

    We talk about what we can do on the following pages.

    Understand what life is like for people with disability

    Our community is learning what life is like for people with disability.

    We still have a lot to learn.

    People said we should:

    • share positive ideas about people with disability all over South Australia
    • teach people everywhere what life is like for people with disability.

    Include people with disability

    People with disability want to take part in:

    • sport
    • fun activities
    • community life.

    People with disability want to:

    • meet different people
    • make new friends.

    People said we should:

    • use more of our money to make our government:
      • accessible
      • inclusive
    • make our public places and shared spaces accessible
    • offer more sports and
    • fun activities that are inclusive.

    Make more places accessible

    The places we go and the ways we use to get there need to be accessible so people with disability can take part in our community.

    We have some accessible:

    • beaches
    • playgrounds.

    People said we should:

    • set higher standards for building and planning
    • fix roads, crossings and footpaths that aren’t safe
    • make more car parking spaces accessible
    • make more taxi ranks accessible
    • promise to use Universal Design ideas.

    Universal Design means we think about what everybody needs when we plan or start new projects and services.

    If we use Universal Design when we make plans, everyone can use every place, space and service from the start.

    Give people a say when we make decisions

    We are starting to include people with disability more when we talk to the community.

    But we don’t always include people with disability when we make decisions.

    It’s important that we include people with disability before we make decisions that affect them.

    People said we should:

    • put together groups of people with disability who can give us advice
    • include people with disability when we make decisions
    • offer programs that can help people with disability get the skills and knowledge they need to live their lives
    • think about the best ways to include people with disability when we talk to the community.

    Help people find work and earn money

    Some workplaces are becoming:

    • accessible
    • inclusive.

    Workplaces are any place you might work, such as:

    • an office
    • a factory
    • a shop.

    Other workplaces still have a lot to learn about what life is like for people with disability.

    People said we should:

    • set goals for how many people with disability work:
      • for us
      • in other workplaces
    • make the ways to find people who can work for us:
      • accessible
      • inclusive
    • teach the community how good it can be to work with people with disability
    • reward employers who give jobs to people with disability
    • develop programs that can teach work skills to people with disability.

    Help people learn and get an education

    Sometimes students with disability don’t get enough support at school.

    Schools and teachers need to learn more about how to be:

    • accessible
    • inclusive.

    People said we should:

    • use more of our money to support students with disability
    • provide more support for students with disability at:
      • school
      • TAFE
      • university
    • make it easier for students with disability to start work after they leave school.

    Give people the services they need

    We don’t have enough support workers in areas that are far away from cities and towns.

    Our support workers don’t always get enough training for the work they need to do.

    People said we should:

    • find more support workers to work with disability service providers
    • give support workers better training
    • use more of our money to support community organisations.

    Give people the information they need

    Our community is glad that we are starting to share information in ways that are easy to read.

    People with disability still aren’t getting enough information about:

    • supports and services
    • their rights
    • what is happening in the community.

    Websites aren’t always the best way for people with disability to get information.

    People said we should:

    • share information in ways that are accessible,
    • not just online
    • collect information people with disability need in 1 place so it’s easy to find
    • support people who are deaf or don’t hear well by making sure our events and news items include:
      • people who can use Auslan
      • captions
    • find ways to get more people in our community to learn Auslan.

    Give people the transport they need

    We don’t have enough accessible transport in areas that are far away from cities and towns.

    There aren’t enough accessible car parks.

    People said we should:

    • make sure people with disability have enough money to pay for the transport they need
    • develop a plan for accessible transport in all parts of our state
    • make sure our public transport is accessible.

    Give people a place to live that feels like home

    When people with disability find a home to live in that meets their needs, it makes a big difference to their lives.

    It can help them get better results with:

    • their education
    • their health and wellbeing
    • how much they take part in their community.

    We don’t have enough of this type of housing.

    It isn’t affordable for everyone.

    This means people with disability:

    • don’t have a lot of choice about where they can live
    • can wait a long time before they can live in a home that meets their needs
    • sometimes live in homes that don’t meet their needs.

    People said we should:

    • make the homes we offer people better
    • use Universal Design ideas when we build new homes
    • make more homes that meet the needs of people with disability available.

    Help people when they use the justice system

    The law protects the rights of people with disability.

    But people with disability don’t always:

    • know what their rights are
    • know where to get help
    • get the support they need.

    We have good advocacy services.

    Advocacy services support you.

    They help you have your say.

    They can also give you information and advice.

    But our advocacy services don’t have enough:

    • staff
    • money.

    People said we should:

    • pay for more support for people with disability who need to use the justice system
    • give more money to advocacy services
    • help people with disability learn how to support themselves.

    Give people the health services they need

    Our health care workers don’t always know or understand the best ways to treat people with disability.

    But more people talk about mental health these days.

    People with disability need more support or advocacy services when they:

    • use health services
    • go to hospital.

    People said we should:

    • teach health care workers and students the best ways to treat people with disability.
    • provide more support and advocacy services in hospitals
    • spend more money on mental health services.

    Being safe

    People with disability face the most safety issues when they use our:

    • public transport
    • roads
    • footpaths.

    It can be much harder for people with disability to feel safe.

    People said we should:

    • send more police out into the community, especially around public transport services
    • find ways to make supports and services better and safer
    • follow what the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability says we should do.

    The Royal Commission is a formal inquiry about the way people with disability are treated.

    Thank you!

    We want to thank everyone who shared their ideas with us.

    We will use what people have said to develop our State Plan.

    When we have written those ideas into a new draft of the State Plan, we will ask you what you think again.

    This will happen in August 2019.

    We will share our final plan with everyone in October 2019.

    Word list

    Accessible

    If something is accessible, everyone can use it. This might be:

    • a place or a building
    • transport
    • a service
    • information
    • a website.

    Advocacy

    Advocacy services support you. They help you have your say. They can also give you information and advice.

    Community forums

    Community forums are events where we get together to talk about our ideas.

    Inclusive

    If something is inclusive, everyone can take part.

    Justice system

    The justice system includes:

    • police
    • lawyers
    • the courts.

    Universal Design

    Universal Design means we think about what everybody needs when we plan or start new projects and services.

    Vision

    Our vision is what we want South Australia to be in the future.

    Workplaces

    Workplaces are any place you might work, such as:

    • an office
    • a factory
    • a shop.

  • State Plan

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

    Inclusive SA: State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019–2023

    Draft content for consultation

    Download the State Plan content on a PDF printable version

    Download the State Plan content on a Word printable version

    Inclusive SA: The Development of South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan 2019 – 2023

    South Australians had their say about our first State Disability Inclusion Plan (State Plan) during March and April this year. Over 380 people took part in consultations across metropolitan and regional South Australia through YourSAy, community forums, written and telephone submissions and face-to-face interviews.

    The consultation was an exciting time and we heard a lot. We heard from people living with disability, their families and carers, people that work in the sector, and other community members. We heard that community attitudes, employment, education and built environments are important to you. Read more about what we heard during consultation in the Consultation Report or the Easy Read version tab.

    Based on what you told us matters the most, we propose that our first State Plan will focus on the following areas:

    1. Leading and collaborating in decision-making
    2. Inclusive communities for all
    3. Accessible communities
    4. Learning and employment

    The proposed State Plan will have an overarching vision, and each theme has its own vision and individual ‘I’ statements.

    We are committed to getting the basics right in our first State Plan and will continue to listen to what the community has to tell us. The consultations with the following priority groups of people living with disability who face additional barriers to access and inclusion are continuing, and will be added to the State Plan within two years, or as the consultations are completed:

    • Women
    • Children
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
    • Culturally and linguistically diverse people

    We are also working with other State Government departments and local councils to develop further actions for change and will update the State Plan when this work is complete.

    There is considerable commitment across State Government and local councils to increase the accessibility and inclusion of our communities for people living with disability. A significant number of agencies already have Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) in place, and many have programs or policies in place to support this commitment. Some examples of existing good practice include supported decision-making resources, access and inclusion committees, disability awareness training across State Government departments, improved access and accessibility features throughout some of South Australia’s National Parks, and the employment of access and inclusion officers within a number of local councils.

    The State Plan will also inform DAIPs, which will be produced by all State authorities (as defined by the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA)), and authorities will be provided with the detailed consultation undertaken by the Department of Human Services to make sure their plans consider what is important to the community.

    The proposed content for the first State Plan recognises the existing work occurring across South Australia and seeks to ensure the effort is built upon and maximised. We want to standardise initiatives and build the capacity of agencies to implement the highest standard of access and inclusion practice across all that they do.

    The National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 was the first time that all governments across Australia committed to a unified, national approach to improving the lives of people with disability, their families and carers. A new disability strategy for beyond 2020 is currently being developed by the Commonwealth and will assist South Australia in our future planning.

    It is also important to note that the South Australian Government continues to work closely with the Commonwealth Government to resolve any gaps identified in service delivery and responsibility, as the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is completed.

    However, the whole community is responsible for improving access and inclusion for people living with disability. It is essential that the State Plan is developed alongside the community so that the whole of South Australia takes ownership and responsibility for bringing it to life.

    The State Plan must be reviewed every four years, but we have committed to reviewing the first plan within the first two years. We will continue to consult and engage with people living with disability, their families and carers, service providers and the broader community to inform access and inclusion in South Australia.

    In the following pages you will find the proposed Vision, the four themes, ‘I’ statements, theme visions, priorities and possible areas for action. We want to check with you that the proposed vision and themes will assist in achieving meaningful change and help realise our vision of an accessible and inclusive South Australian community for people living with disability.

    Inclusive SA: Our Vision.

    Our vision is a community that is accessible and inclusive of all South Australians, where people living with disability are valued and treated equally, and with respect.

    A community that is liveable for all, where people’s voices are heard and respected, have opportunities to contribute, and fairness, safety and equality are upheld.

    Theme 1: Leading and collaborating in decision-making.

    Key words.

    Participation, decision-making, engagement, consultation, leadership.

    What you told us.

    We heard that the requirement for the State Government to consult under the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) is a positive step and there is already positive change within the community, with more inclusive consultations taking place. Local governments also connect with the disability community through advisory groups and committees. Further opportunities are required so people living with disability can be more actively involved in government decision-making that affects their lives. Leadership training to build skills and capacity is also needed. Consultation must be genuine, meaningful and tailored to meet the needs of all people living with disability.

    Vision.

    The perspectives of people living with disability are highly valued, actively sought and acted upon. People living with disability have a say in decisions that affect their lives, including all levels of Government and community decision-making.

    I statements.

    • I can take action.
    • I am truly valued.
    • I can make my own life choices.

    Priorities and actions.

    Priority 1: Participation in decision-making

    Possible actions:

    1. Establish a Disability Register to assist State Government and local councils in identifying people with lived experience for boards and committees and other advisory groups

    2. Develop a Supported Decision-Making policy and practice framework to support people living with disability to make decisions about services that affect their lives.

    Priority 2: Leadership and raising profile

    Possible actions:

    3. Investigate the establishment of a whole of State Government Disability Advisory Council that can provide advice on whole of government policies and initiatives to ensure they support and improve access and inclusion for people living with disability, with a focus on regional South Australia.

    4. Investigate the establishment of a register of people living with disability and organisations who can be engaged as mentors, speakers and trainers for the purpose of building the capacity of people living with disability, for South Australia.

    Priority 3: Engagement and consultation

    Possible actions:

    5. Develop consultation and engagement resources that promote co-design principles.

    6. Review and relaunch the existing Disability Engagement Group Register, ensuring it is available for State Government and local councils as a resource that promotes engagement and consultation with people living with disability.

    Possible DAIP actions:

    7. State authorities will establish consultation and engagement practices that ensure people living with disability are engaged and consulted with, including within regional South Australia.

    8. State authorities working with young people to consider how their services can support capacity building for young people living with disability, so they can confidently participate in decision-making.

    Measures and outputs:

    a) Boards and committees disability register established.

    b) Recommendations delivered to the State Government on the establishment of a whole of State Government Disability Advisory Council.

    c) Feasibility of creating a register of people living with disability and organisations that can provide leadership training, mentoring and training investigated.

    d) State Government consultation and engagement resources that promote co-design principles, and accessible and inclusive consultation and engagement practices developed.

    e) Disability Engagement Group Register relaunched and promoted.

    Trend indicators 1[1]:

    f) Percentage of people living with disability actively involved in governance / civic groups[2].

    Theme 2: Inclusive communities for all

    Key words

    Social inclusion, inclusion, rights, community education and awareness, accessible and available information.

    What you told us

    Social inclusion was identified as a top priority in the consultation as it affects all aspects of life and social exclusion creates barriers to opportunities. Participants reported that people living with disability often feel excluded from community life and interaction with people such as friends, colleagues and neighbours.

    We also heard that the legal framework that protects the rights of people living with disability is quite strong, however many people do not know enough about their rights and where to go for support and advice.

    There is a need for more education and awareness-raising among people in the general community, workplaces, schools and educational institutions, health and other service providers, retail and hospitality providers, transport providers and all tiers of government.

    The consultation also told us that all forms of information need to be accessible and available for people living with disability in a variety of forms, not just web based.

    Vision

    The contributions and rights of people living with disability are valued and understood by the broader community and the community is committed to social inclusion. People living with disability have their rights promoted, upheld and protected and are supported to advocate for their own rights. People living with disability have the knowledge and skills to promote/advocate for their own rights.

    I statements

    • I am included in the community.
    • I am understood and valued.
    • I know my rights and can access information.

    Priorities and actions

    Priority 4: Improving community understanding and awareness

    Possible actions:

    9. Work with relevant State Government agencies and local councils to explore the best ways to improve community understanding and awareness that complements and leverages the national effort under the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 and the emerging disability policy for beyond 2020.

    10. Work with the Commonwealth to develop data measures that measure changes in community understanding and awareness about the rights and needs of people living with disability.

    Priority 5: Promoting the rights of people living with disability

    Possible actions:

    11. Identify and promote best practice access and inclusion resources and existing legislative requirements across a range of different sectors, including retail and hospitality.

    12. Review existing disability awareness training content, establish best practice and standardise for new employees across all State Government agencies.

    13. Local Council DAIPs to consider the review of existing disability awareness training as part of their induction program for new employees.

    Priority 6: Accessible and available information

    Possible actions:

    14. Develop best practice resources to support State authorities to ensure their communication is available in a range of accessible formats. These may include easy read, Auslan, pictorial forms, large font, audible options, braille, subtitles and voice over.

    15. Support all State Government agencies to ensure their websites meet the WCAG-2.1 accessibility standards.

    16. Develop an accessible website (and consider other communication mediums) containing relevant information about disability in South Australia, including but not limited to:

    • Links to resources for various sectors on best practice access and inclusion practices and existing legislative requirements.
    • Guides and links to resources to assist State authorities in the development of their DAIPs.
    • Guidelines relating to accessibility and availability of information in varying formats.

    Priority 7: Involvement in the community[3]

    Possible actions:

    17. Develop an accessible event guide for State Government and local councils to ensure their events support access and inclusion for people living with disability.

    18. Explore the redesign or creation of an app (or other medium) that displays existing and future services and facilities (such as toilets, eateries, sports and recreation facilities, transport services, beaches that are wheelchair and disability-access friendly).

    Possible DAIP actions:

    19. State authorities to consider measures that reflect and adopt the best practice resources relating to communication, websites and events for their services to support access and inclusion for people living with disability.

    20. State authorities to consider including in their DAIPs measures that support access and inclusion principles being built into their program/service delivery models.

    21. DAIPs to consider how access and inclusion to sport, recreation and cultural facilities within the community can be improved.

    Measures and outputs:

    g) Proportion of people with disability participating in common cultural and recreational activities groups.

    h) Proportion of people with disability participating in community support / social groups[4].

    i) Research conducted and recommendations developed on a strategy to improve community understanding and awareness of disability.

    j) Improved access to standardised information about best practice communication, website and community events that ensure access and inclusion for people living with disability.

    k) Best practice guides developed for State authorities to assist communication, websites and events to support access and inclusion for people living with disability.

    l) Inclusive Event Guide published.

    m) SA Disability website established and operational.

    n) Recommendations delivered and project plan developed for the creation of a smart phone app that lists wheelchair and disability-access friendly services and facilities

    Trend Indicators [5]:

    o) Proportion of people with disability participating in common cultural and recreational activities groups.

    p) Proportion of people with disability participating in community support / social groups [6].

    q) Report on the feelings of safety in different situations by disability category.

    Theme 3: Accessible communities

    Key words

    Built environment, universal design, health, wellness, access to services, cost of living, transport, housing, belonging, community.

    What you told us

    Although some consultation participants reported an overall improvement in physical accessibility (especially for wheelchair users) there is still frustration about the number of physical barriers faced daily (from footpaths and roads, to businesses and restaurants, to public facilities and community spaces). Participants called for greater commitment to universal design and for more attention to be placed on improving the built environment both in the State Plan and DAIPs. Access to quality services is equally important and while participants recognised that many organisations in South Australia provide a high level of support, improved access to transport options, health services and recreation are vital for connection and belonging in community.

    Vision

    People living with disability have access to, and are included in, all areas of our community, including through public and community infrastructure and access to quality services to improve and promote health and wellbeing.

    I statements

    • My community offers what I need to live the life I want.
    • I am included and can access everything I need.
    • I have choice and support.

    Priorities and actions

    Priority 8: Universal design across South Australia

    Possible actions:

    22. Consider establishing a whole of State Government universal design policy that sets out a consistent universal design approach for government buildings and codes and standards, and that also provides support and awareness for private businesses.

    23. Consider universal design criteria being incorporated in all relevant State Government contracts.

    24. Consider embedding best practice universal design principles in the State Planning and Design Code required under the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 (SA).

    Priority 9: Access to services

    Possible actions:

    25. Continue to work with the Commonwealth Government and the NDIA to ensure a diverse range of disability support providers are operating effectively in South Australia. This will include strategies to support workforce growth with a focus on regional areas.

    26. State Government and local councils to consider including in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules the installation of signs on the front of public buildings indicating disability access; and installation of multi-media devices in queues at service outlets to include people who are deaf and blind.

    Possible DAIP actions:

    27. Department of Planning Transport and Infrastructure DAIP to consider consultation outcomes including:

    • Provide disability training for all public transport staff.
    • Voice systems in buses (similar to trains) notifying people of the next stop.
    • Reviewing availability of accessible buses during peak hours.
    • Improve public information about accessible buses.

    28. SA Health DAIP to consider consultation outcomes including:

    • Review and monitor the training for health care workers/students on how to communicate with and support people living with disability.
    • Investigate the systemic advocacy needs of people living with disability within hospital settings.

    29. Local council DAIPs to consider consultation outcomes including:

    • Review of availability of accessible car parks including function, design and location.
    • Incorporating universal design principles in criteria to determine priority within infrastructure works and maintenance schedules.

    30. SA Housing Authority DAIP to consider consultation outcomes including:

    • Incorporating universal design principles in criteria to determine priority within infrastructure works and maintenance schedules.

    Measure and outputs:

    r) Feasibility of whole of State Government universal design policy for government buildings and codes and standards considered.

    s) Universal design criteria considered in all relevant State Government contracts.

    t) Feasibility of best practice universal design principles in the State Planning and Design Code considered.

    Trend indicators [7]:

    u) Decrease in proportion of people with disability reporting difficulty using public transport in South Australia.

    v) Increase in proportion of people with disability who report their health status as good or better.

    w) Increased access to general practitioners, dental and other primary healthcare professionals for people with disability

    Theme 4: Learning and employment

    Key words

    Employment, education, volunteering, learning, training, ability, flexibility

    What you told us

    Workforce participation is fundamental to social inclusion. It provides economic independence and choice, social connections and friendships, value, identity and belonging. Improvements are required in the awareness of employers, employees and the wider community of what people living with disability bring to places of work, study and the community. More is needed to support places of work, study and volunteering to be accessible and inclusive. Better supports are needed for students finishing their education, to support a pathway between education and employment, and those who are working in supported environments. More training opportunities are required in areas such as leadership, rights and self-advocacy for the wider disability community, starting with building the capacity and expectation of children living with disability to be involved in decision-making.

    Vision

    The contributions and abilities of people living with disability are understood, valued and sought. People living with disability have access to meaningful and inclusive employment, volunteering and education opportunities.

    I statements

    • I can make the most of my abilities.
    • My contribution is valued.
    • I can have a fair go.

    Priorities and actions

    Priority 10: Better supports within educational and training settings and in navigating the pathway between learning and earning

    Possible actions:

    31. State education and training authorities to develop and implement inclusion principles/policies to support inclusive education culture and practices.

    32. State education authorities to work in partnership with children, students, parents/carers, industry and the community to provide the required curriculum and learning opportunities that are personalised and tailored to the individual and prepare for life beyond school.

    33. Investigate data required to measure and track the percentage of people living with disability participating and achieving in education and training. Investigate how pathways from education to post school can be provided.

    Priority 11: Skill development through opportunities for volunteering

    Possible actions:

    DAIPs to consider meaningful volunteering opportunities for people living with disabilities, to gain skills and experience.

    Priority 12: Improved access to employment opportunities and better support within workplaces

    Possible actions:

    35. Support and monitor the implementation of the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment’s (OCPSE) Public Sector Disability Employment Strategy across the whole of State Government.

    36. Increase employment opportunities across all levels in the South Australian public sector through the Disability Employment Register and targeting of job opportunities for people with disability.

    37. Develop a guide for South Australian businesses to improve awareness about the benefits of employing people living with disability and the importance of paying award wages.

    38. Investigate data measures to:

    • Track the percentage of people living with disability employed and retained in State authorities.
    • Track the number of State authorities with policies and practices that support the employment of people living with disability.

    Possible DAIP actions:

    39. State authorities to consider the development of disability employment strategies and supports within their DAIPs and report on progress.

    Measures and outputs:

    x) OCPSE Public Sector Disability Employment Strategy adopted across the whole of State Government.

    y) Consultation on expanding the Public Sector Disability Employment Register.

    z) Guide developed and promoted to improve business awareness and confidence to employ more people.

    aa) Data measures investigated and developed where possible for:

    • Retention (length of employment) of people living with disability in State Government and local councils.
    • Number of State authorities with policies and practices that support the employment of people living with disability.

    Trend Indicators [8]:

    bb) Educational achievement of people with disability.
    cc) Proportion of people aged 15 – 64 with disability with non-school qualification.
    dd) Proportion of people with disability with post-school qualifications.
    ee) Proportion of people with disability participating in the labour-force.
    ff) Proportion of people with disability in both private and public sector employment.
    gg) Difference between average income of people with disability and the average income for all Australians.



    [1] Australian Bureau of Statistics General Social Survey or Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

    [2] Civic participation refers to involvement in a union, professional association, political party, environmental or animal welfare group, human and civil rights group, or body corporate or tenants' association.

    [3] People living with disability have the same access to cultural, community and sport/recreation facilities and events.

    [4] Community support/social groups refer to active involvement in a service club, welfare organisation, education and training, parenting/children/youth, sport or physical recreation group, arts or heritage group, religious or spiritual group, craft/recreation/special interest group or social club.

    [5] Australian Bureau of Statistics General Social Survey or Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

    [6] Community support/social groups refer to active involvement in a service club, welfare organisation, education and training, parenting/children/youth, sport or physical recreation group, arts or heritage group, religious or spiritual group, craft/recreation/special interest group or social club.

    [7] Australian Bureau of Statistics Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

    [8] Australian Bureau of Statistics Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

  • State Plan (Easy Read)

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Now Closed

    This online engagement was hosted on YourSAy from 6 August 2019 to 30 August 2019. Find out more about the consultation process. Below is a record of this engagement.

    Ideas for our first State Disability Inclusion Plan

    We want to know what you think

    Easy Read version

    Download the State Plan (Easy Read version) on a PDF printable version

    Download the State Plan (Easy Read version) on a Word printable version

    How to use this document

    The South Australian Government Department of Human Services (DHS) wrote this document. When you see the word ‘we’, it means the South Australian Government.

    We have written this information in an easy to read way.

    We have written some words in bold. We explain what these words mean. There is a list of these words at the end of this page.

    This Easy Read document is a summary of another document.

    You can ask for help to read this document. A friend, family member or support person may be able to help you.

    What’s on this page?

    • About our State Disability Inclusion Plan
    • Talking to the community about our State Plan
    • Groups in our community
    • Our vision for South Australia
    • Important themes
    • Theme 1
    • Theme 2
    • Theme 3
    • Theme 4
    • Other ideas
    • What happens next?
    • Word list

    About our State Disability Inclusion Plan

    In 2018, we wrote a new law – the Disability Inclusion Act 2018.

    We call it the Act.

    The Act explains how people with disability should be treated.

    After we introduced the Act, we started writing our first State Disability Inclusion Plan (our State Plan).

    Our State Plan is an important step we must take to make sure our community is:

    • inclusive
    • accessible.

    If something is inclusive, everyone can take part.

    If something is accessible, everyone can use it. This might be:

    • a place or a building
    • transport
    • a service
    • information
    • a website.

    Our State Plan talks about our goals for the next 4 years.

    Other parts of the government have written plans too, including:

    • state government departments
    • local councils.

    We call these plans Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIP).

    Talking to the community about our State Plan

    It’s important for us to talk to the community about any plans we make.

    We talked with the community about our State Plan in March and April 2019.

    384 people told us what they think should be in our State Plan.

    Over 130 of those were people with disability.

    Some of the other people we talked to were:

    • family members
    • carers
    • people who work with people with disability
    • people who work for state and local governments
    • researchers.

    Groups in our community

    There are many groups in our community who face extra barriers and challenges.

    These groups include:

    • women with disability
    • children with disability
    • people with disability from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds
    • people with disability who come from different cultures
    • people with disability who speak languages other than English at home.

    We are talking to these groups about our State Plan:

    • in different ways
    • at different times.

    Our vision for South Australia

    Our vision is what we want our state to be in the future.

    We want our state to be a place where everyone:

    • is treated fairly
    • is treated with respect
    • is safe
    • is treated equally
    • has the same opportunities.

    Important themes

    We heard about the issues that affect people with disability the most.

    There are 4 areas we need to focus on.

    We call these themes.

    The themes are:

    1. Give people a say before decisions are made.
    2. Make our community inclusive.
    3. Make more places accessible.
    4. Help people get an education and find work.

    We talk about each of these themes in more detail below.

    We have included:

    • our vision for each theme
    • a list of the things we think we could all do
    • ‘I’ statements.

    ‘I’ statements are like goals.

    Theme 1

    Give people a say before decisions are made

    We are including people with disability more when we talk to the community.

    But people with disability aren’t always included when we make decisions.

    It’s important to include people with disability in decisions that affect them.

    Our vision for this theme

    People with disability tell us about their:

    • lives
    • experiences.

    What they tell us is important.

    We do something when they tell us about the issues they face.

    People with disability have a say before decisions that affect their lives are made.

    Our ideas about this theme

    We could:

    • write a list of people who can take part in meetings about disability issues with our state government and local councils
    • try to create a group of people who can give us advice about disability issues
    • help write rules for how to include people with disability in the decisions that affect them
    • set goals for how many people with disability work for our state government
    • only use the best ways to include people with disability when we talk to the community.

    ‘I’ statements

    I can take action.

    I am truly valued.

    I can make my own life choices.

    Questions to think about

    Have we put good ideas in our vision for the theme Give people a say before decisions are made?

    These are very bad ideas.

    These are bad ideas.

    Some of these ideas are good but some are bad too.

    These are good ideas.

    These are very good ideas.

    Is there anything else we need to think about for this theme?

    Theme 2

    Include people with disability

    People with disability want to take part in:

    • sport
    • fun activities
    • community life.

    People with disability want to:

    • meet different people
    • make new friends.

    Our community is learning what life is like for people with disability.

    We still have a lot to learn.

    People with disability need more information about:

    • supports and services
    • their rights
    • what is happening in their community.

    Websites aren’t always the best way for people with disability to get information.

    Our vision for this theme

    Our community values people with disability.

    Our community understands people with disability.

    We protect the rights of people with disability.

    People with disability can speak up about their own rights.

    Our ideas about this theme

    We could:

    • try to find the best ways to teach people what life is like for people with disability
    • help people know where to get good information about how to be:
      • accessible
      • inclusive
    • teach people why it’s important to share information in accessible formats, such as:
      • easy to read versions
      • large print versions
      • audio versions
      • braille
      • using subtitles
    • help make sure our government’s websites are accessible
    • develop a website called Inclusive SA that gives people lots of good information about disability in our state
    • create a guide that helps people run events that are:
      • accessible
      • inclusive.

    ‘I’ statements

    I am part of the community.

    I am understood.

    I am valued.

    I know what my rights are.

    I can find and use the information I need.

    Questions to think about

    Have we put good ideas in our vision for the theme Include people with disability?

    These are very bad ideas.

    These are bad ideas.

    Some of these ideas are good but some are bad too.

    These are good ideas.

    These are very good ideas.

    Is there anything else we need to think about for this theme?

    Theme 3

    Make more places accessible

    The places we go and the ways we use to get there need to be accessible so people with disability can take part in our community.

    We have some accessible:

    • beaches
    • playgrounds.

    We need to:

    • fix roads, crossings and footpaths that aren’t safe
    • make more car parking spaces accessible use Universal Design ideas.

    Universal Design means we think about what everybody needs when we plan or start new projects and services.

    If we use Universal Design when we make plans, everyone can use every place, space and service from the start.

    Support the health and wellbeing of people with disability

    People with disability need good care and services for their:

    • health
    • wellbeing.

    People with disability must be able to:

    • take part in their community
    • connect with other people.

    Our vision for this theme

    Our community is accessible.

    Our community is inclusive.

    People with disability can find and use the services they need for their health and wellbeing.

    Our ideas about this theme

    We could:

    • write a guide for our government about using Universal Design
    • include ideas about using Universal Design when we hire people to work on big projects for us
    • include ideas about using Universal Design in our laws about planning and building
    • work with the Australian Government to make sure people with disability in SA have the services they need
    • clearly show the community:
      • which services are accessible
      • how services are accessible
    • help government workers understand the best ways to support people with disability.

    ‘I’ statements

    My community offers me what I need so I can live the life I want.

    I am included.

    I can find and use the supports and services I need.

    I have choice.

    Questions to think about

    Have we put good ideas in our vision for the theme Make more places accessible?

    These are very bad ideas.

    These are bad ideas.

    Some of these ideas are good but some are bad too.

    These are good ideas.

    These are very good ideas.

    Is there anything else we need to think about for this theme?

    Theme 4

    Help people get an education and find work

    Places where people with disability learn or work need to be:

    • accessible
    • inclusive.

    People with disability need to learn more about:

    • becoming leaders
    • their rights
    • speaking up for themselves and their rights.

    We need to make it easier for students with disability to start work after they leave school.

    Some workplaces are becoming:

    • accessible
    • inclusive.

    Workplaces are any place you might work, such as:

    • an office
    • a factory
    • a shop.

    Other workplaces still have a lot to learn about what life is like for people with disability.

    Our vision for this theme

    We understand and value what people with disability can offer in our workplaces.

    We make the ways we use to find people who can work for us:

    • accessible
    • inclusive.

    We support people with disability in their work.

    We know about the good work people with disability do.

    Our ideas about this theme

    We will:

    • make places where people with disability go to study and learn:
      • accessible
      • inclusive
    • make it easier for students with disability to start work after they leave school
    • teach people with disability:
      • how to be leaders
      • what their rights are
      • how to speak up for themselves
    • set new goals for how many people with disability work for us.

    ‘I’ statements

    I can make the most of the skills I have learned.

    I am valued for what I can do.

    I get a fair go.

    Questions to think about

    Have we put good ideas in our vision for the theme Help people get an education and find work?

    These are very bad ideas.

    These are bad ideas.

    Some of these ideas are good but some are bad too.

    These are good ideas.

    These are very good ideas.

    Is there anything else we need to think about for this theme?

    Other ideas

    Is there anything else you would like to tell us?

    What happens next?

    We want to thank everyone who shared their ideas with us.

    We will use what people have said to develop our State Plan.

    We will share our final plan with everyone in October 2019.

    We will look at how well our State Plan is going every 4 years.

    Because this is our first State Plan, we will look at how well it is going in 2 years.

    We will always talk to our community about:

    • the issues that affect people with disability
    • making our community
      • accessible
      • inclusive.

    Word list

    Accessible

    If something is accessible, everyone can use it. This might be:

    • a place or a building
    • transport
    • a service
    • information
    • a website.

    Inclusive

    If something is inclusive, everyone can take part.

    Universal Design

    Universal Design means we think about what everybody needs when we plan or start new projects and services.

    Vision

    Our vision is what we want South Australia to be in the future.

    Workplaces

    Workplaces are any place you might work, such as:

    • an office
    • a factory
    • a shop.

    The Information Access Group created this Easy Read document.

  • Updates

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    State Disability Inclusion Plan - Update

    South Australia’s first Disability Inclusion Plan, Inclusive SA, launched.