SA Health Palliative Care Project

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Consultation has concluded. Thanks for your contributions.

You can read a summary of key outcomes in the Updates section below.

We are developing a new and innovative Palliative Care Services Plan and Model of Care Framework for South Australia and we would like your input. 


What is being decided?

We are seeking input from the South Australian public and palliative care stakeholders to ensure that the new Palliative Care Services Plan and Model of Care Framework can meet the needs of our community and support us to deliver on the vision of the Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027.

All South Australians, their families and carers have access to and receive the best possible end of life and palliative care that places the person at the centre of care and supports them to live and die well in accordance with their individual needs, wishes, values and preferences.”

Background

What has been done so far?

South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027 was launched in December 2021 and contained:

  • a vision and goals for the palliative care service system in South Australia 
  • four priority areas 
  • specific actions that we will commit to over the next 5 years to shape the palliative care system so that more people can die well in South Australia.

Key deliverables identified in South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027 are a statewide services plan and model of care framework which will inform improvements and investment in SA Health administered palliative care services over the next five years. This will deliver best practice holistic and high quality services, with equitable and easy access for all palliative care consumers.

One of the first steps in this work, was to better understand current palliative care service delivery and access across SA, including any opportunities for improvement. The SA Specialist Palliative Care Current State Analysis report was completed in March 2023, informed by contributions and stories posted on this YourSAy page by the South Australian public, review of published documentation, data analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a series of case study discussions with ten palliative care consumers and/or their families and carers.

The Current State Analysis Report - Key Findings and Recommendations paper presents a summary of the analysis.

The analysis reveals that within South Australia we have a palliative care system that is dedicated to delivering high quality services and high-quality outcomes for South Australians with life-limiting illnesses. Further improvements in equity, access to services, workforce support, data collection and funding can have a positive impact on future demand and consumer and clinician experience.

The current state analysis identifies 11 opportunities for action within SA Health’s remit for the next stage of the project. These opportunities align with the priority actions of South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027, and aim to support current and future population needs.


What are the next steps?

SA Health in partnership with the Statewide Palliative Care Clinical Network is developing an action plan in response to the current state analysis recommendations. The action plan will be endorsed later in the year.

Implementation of the action plan and ongoing work to develop the services plan and model of care framework will continue to be informed by the narratives and experiences of South Australia’s palliative care consumers and the community. Feedback will be sourced through the project’s consultation processes including a new YourSAy page.

If you have a enquiry about this project, please email Lorraine Scorsonelli (Project Manager), at lorraine.scorsonelli@sa.gov.au.


More information on palliative care

If you would like to know about South Australia's palliative care services, please visit the SA Health website or visit Palliative Care SA.

You can read a summary of key outcomes in the Updates section below.

We are developing a new and innovative Palliative Care Services Plan and Model of Care Framework for South Australia and we would like your input. 


What is being decided?

We are seeking input from the South Australian public and palliative care stakeholders to ensure that the new Palliative Care Services Plan and Model of Care Framework can meet the needs of our community and support us to deliver on the vision of the Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027.

All South Australians, their families and carers have access to and receive the best possible end of life and palliative care that places the person at the centre of care and supports them to live and die well in accordance with their individual needs, wishes, values and preferences.”

Background

What has been done so far?

South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027 was launched in December 2021 and contained:

  • a vision and goals for the palliative care service system in South Australia 
  • four priority areas 
  • specific actions that we will commit to over the next 5 years to shape the palliative care system so that more people can die well in South Australia.

Key deliverables identified in South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027 are a statewide services plan and model of care framework which will inform improvements and investment in SA Health administered palliative care services over the next five years. This will deliver best practice holistic and high quality services, with equitable and easy access for all palliative care consumers.

One of the first steps in this work, was to better understand current palliative care service delivery and access across SA, including any opportunities for improvement. The SA Specialist Palliative Care Current State Analysis report was completed in March 2023, informed by contributions and stories posted on this YourSAy page by the South Australian public, review of published documentation, data analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a series of case study discussions with ten palliative care consumers and/or their families and carers.

The Current State Analysis Report - Key Findings and Recommendations paper presents a summary of the analysis.

The analysis reveals that within South Australia we have a palliative care system that is dedicated to delivering high quality services and high-quality outcomes for South Australians with life-limiting illnesses. Further improvements in equity, access to services, workforce support, data collection and funding can have a positive impact on future demand and consumer and clinician experience.

The current state analysis identifies 11 opportunities for action within SA Health’s remit for the next stage of the project. These opportunities align with the priority actions of South Australia’s Palliative Care Strategic Framework 2022-2027, and aim to support current and future population needs.


What are the next steps?

SA Health in partnership with the Statewide Palliative Care Clinical Network is developing an action plan in response to the current state analysis recommendations. The action plan will be endorsed later in the year.

Implementation of the action plan and ongoing work to develop the services plan and model of care framework will continue to be informed by the narratives and experiences of South Australia’s palliative care consumers and the community. Feedback will be sourced through the project’s consultation processes including a new YourSAy page.

If you have a enquiry about this project, please email Lorraine Scorsonelli (Project Manager), at lorraine.scorsonelli@sa.gov.au.


More information on palliative care

If you would like to know about South Australia's palliative care services, please visit the SA Health website or visit Palliative Care SA.

Share your story

Please use this space to share the stories of your experiences with the palliative care system. 

Please outline within your story whether you are a: 

  • person with a life limiting illness,
  • family member or friend
  • paid carer,
  • clinician, or
  • other

Your story will help us to build an understanding of the perspectives of the public and the experiences being had.

Please remember to remain respectful and do not include any information that may compromise the privacy of yourself or another.

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    Let down at the most crucial time

    by Unhappy Brenda, over 1 year ago

    My name is Brenda. I worked in the aged care industry for over 20 years.

    During those years I was involved with palliative care both at work and at home. My Mother had dementia and an acquired brain injury and we, her family, had to put her into care. The last 3 years of her live was terrible. Palliative care in her nursing home was not up to standard. Fortunately, we did have the support of a palliative care in our area so at least her pain levels were addressed.

    Then a few years after that, my husband was dying... Continue reading

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    Pure Horror

    by Graham77, over 1 year ago

    My wife died 31/01/2018 of breast cancer. Her terminal stages had taken 5 years after about 22 yrs 'remission'.

    In her final stage she took 12 weeks to die - 'too slowly' to be permitted to remain in the Modbury hospital palliative care ward (hospice) therefore we spent her last 7 weeks in the nearby nursing home within our retirement village.

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    Her GP visited most evenings -... Continue reading

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    not all broken legs are the same

    by Trish, over 1 year ago

    My mother’s death

    I cared for my mother at home from when she was showing clear signs of dementia in 2010 until she died, in 2020.

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    Sent home and told to die of starvation

    by The Mc Dad, over 1 year ago

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    My story as a family member and Palliative volunteer

    by Suejacquier, over 1 year ago
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    In the case of my brother (who passed in 2010) in the Barossa, I can only say, it was my fellow volunteers that got me through..NOT the Palliative care service. Any service in this space that only provided that service during the hours of 9-5, is appalling. I understand that there are not enough staff to cover all bases, all hours....but why not? Dying is'nt scheduled to those hours... Continue reading

  • Share Lisbeth on Facebook Share Lisbeth on Twitter Share Lisbeth on Linkedin Email Lisbeth link

    Lisbeth

    by Lisbeth Cock, over 1 year ago
    My daughter has cancer .. terminal .. how much longer ? I hope they are wrong, the latest update says before Christmas 2022. Is there help for her to die at home? She does not want to spend her last hours in a hospice.
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    No quality of life is no way to be at end of life...

    by Brigitta, almost 2 years ago

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    Home away from Home

    by Virginia Summers, almost 2 years ago
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    It could have been better and meant much more.

    by John Arthur, almost 2 years ago
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    Modbury Hospital Heroes

    by Brian Clements, almost 2 years ago
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